Yosemite National Park - National Park Service

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Yosemite National Park

Volunteers in Parks Handbook

Revised 01/2017

WELCOME TO YOSEMITE! ................................................................................................................ 1 INTRODUCTION TO THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE AND YOSEMITE .................................. 2 NPS MISSION ......................................................................................................................................... 2 YOSEMITE VOLUNTEER PROGRAM................................................................................................ 2 Volunteer Office .................................................................................................................................. 2 PURPOSE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PARK ............................................................................... 3 LIVING IN YOSEMITE ......................................................................................................................... 4 WHEN YOU ARRIVE ............................................................................................................................ 4 BEARS ..................................................................................................................................................... 5 THE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF YOSEMITE ................................................................. 6 Office of the Superintendent ................................................................................................................ 6 Planning Division................................................................................................................................. 7 Division of Project Management ......................................................................................................... 7 Division of Administrative Services .................................................................................................... 7 Division of Business And Revenue Management ............................................................................... 7 Division of Facilities Management ...................................................................................................... 8 Division of Interpretation and Education ............................................................................................. 8 Division of Resource Management and Science ................................................................................. 9 Division of Visitor and Resource Protection ..................................................................................... 10 PARK PARTNERS ............................................................................................................................... 10 NatureBridge ...................................................................................................................................... 10 The Yosemite Conservancy ............................................................................................................... 11 Aramark at Yosemite ......................................................................................................................... 11 The Ansel Adams Gallery .................................................................................................................. 11 The Sierra Club / Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center ................Error! Bookmark not defined. VOLUNTEER PROGRAM OPERATIONS ......................................................................................... 11 Who Can Volunteer?.......................................................................................................................... 11 Employees and Family Members as VIPs ......................................................................................... 12 What Can Volunteers Do? ................................................................................................................. 12 Volunteer Protection .......................................................................................................................... 13 VOLUNTEER RIGHTS ........................................................................................................................ 14 VOLUNTEER RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................................................... 14 Ethical and Professional Behavior ..................................................................................................... 14 SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY .................................................................................................... 15 FIREARM POLICY .............................................................................................................................. 15 USE OF A VIP’S PERSONAL EQUIPMENT ..................................................................................... 15 VOLUNTEER AGREEMENT FORM 301A ........................................................................................ 16 TIMESHEETS ....................................................................................................................................... 16 PER DIEM AND REIMBURSEMENTS .............................................................................................. 16 VOLUNTEER STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPS) AND POLICIES ..................... 16 VOLUNTEER UNIFORM .................................................................................................................... 17 ORIENTATION AND TRAINING ...................................................................................................... 17 HOUSING.............................................................................................................................................. 18 Campground Information................................................................................................................... 18 SAFETY ................................................................................................................................................ 19 If You Experience a Mishap .............................................................................................................. 19 2

GETTING AROUND ............................................................................................................................ 21 Personal Vehicles ............................................................................................................................... 21 Bicycles .............................................................................................................................................. 22 YARTS .............................................................................................................................................. 22 Yosemite Valley Shuttle and Tuolumne Shuttle................................................................................ 22 Amtrak ............................................................................................................................................... 23 Airports .............................................................................................................................................. 23 Road and Vehicle Information ........................................................................................................... 23 MAIL ..................................................................................................................................................... 24 LOCATIONS OF VARIOUS BUILDINGS AND SERVICES ............................................................ 25 Yosemite Medical Clinic ....................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined. Dental Clinic .......................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined. Showers .............................................................................................................................................. 25 Internet ............................................................................................................................................... 25 Cell Phone Coverage.......................................................................................................................... 25 Groceries ............................................................................................................................................ 25 Propane .............................................................................................................................................. 26 Wellness and Fitness Centers............................................................................................................. 26 Swimming Pools ................................................................................................................................ 27 Laundry .............................................................................................................................................. 27 Libraries ............................................................................................................................................. 27 Religious Services .............................................................................................................................. 28 Bank/ATM ......................................................................................................................................... 28 Recycling Stations ............................................................................................................................. 28 DAY-OFF OPTIONS ............................................................................................................................ 28 Yosemite Employee Association (YEA) and Community Hall Events ............................................. 28 Wellness Center Activities ................................................................................................................. 29 Gateway Communities ....................................................................................................................... 29 Group Yoga in El Portal .................................................................................................................... 29 Hiking ................................................................................................................................................ 29 Fishing Licenses................................................................................................................................. 30 Volunteering with another Division or Branch .................................................................................. 30 Other places to find local events and activities… .............................................................................. 30 YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK ON THE WEB................................................................................. 30 IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS...................................................................................................... 31 Frequently Used NPS Phone Numbers (area code 209) .................................................................... 31 Community Listings (area code 209) ................................................................................................. 31 WHAT TO DO IN THE CASE OF AN EMERGENCY ...................................................................... 32

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WELCOME TO YOSEMITE! We are excited that you are joining the team at Yosemite and are appreciative of the service you are donating to the Park! This handbook is intended to introduce you to the National Park Service, Yosemite National Park and the Volunteer Program as well as to life in the area. This information is supplemental to the information found on the Yosemite National Park, website: www.nps.gov/yose, in the Yosemite Guide, in the Yosemite Park Map, and in the FAQs available on the park’s SharePoint intranet. As part of the National Park System, Yosemite contains many resources that serve many interests. Within the park’s boundaries are historical, scientific, scenic, and recreational resources which invite pondering and/or exploration. Recreational opportunities include backpacking, hiking, world-class climbing, fishing, camping, sight-seeing, along with cross-country and downhill skiing, snowboarding and snow-shoeing (during the winter season). We are quite certain that you will not run out of things to do and enjoy! The park’s free Yosemite Guide is a helpful resource describing the park, as well as useful information for people new to the area. Additionally, you are encouraged to visit the park’s web site at www.nps.gov/yose for more park-specific information. There are many communities outside the park, where you will find additional businesses ready to meet your needs, including auto repair facilities, clothing stores, dry cleaners, theaters, recreation, specialty restaurants, and more. Operations in Yosemite change frequently; we update this handbook annually, but some information may be out of date. Check with your supervisor for most current information.

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INTRODUCTION TO THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE AND YOSEMITE Throughout the history of the national parks, volunteers have carried on a proud tradition. From the establishment of the first national park, Yellowstone, in 1872, to the establishment of the National Park Service itself, in 1916, and continuing on today, private citizens have played a vital role in the development of the national park system. The primary purpose of the Volunteers-in-Parks (VIP) program is to provide a vehicle through which the NPS can accept and utilize voluntary help in such a way that is beneficial to the NPS and the volunteer.

NPS MISSION “The National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the national park system for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout this country and the world.”

YOSEMITE VOLUNTEER PROGRAM The Yosemite National Park Volunteer Program collaborates with the National Park Service and its partners to engage the public in meaningful experiences, promoting an enduring stewardship ethic. The goals of the program are to:  Collaborate with divisions and partners to accomplish park goals through hands-on volunteer efforts.  Provide meaningful opportunities for volunteers to share their time, talents, and skills.  Facilitate experiences, especially for youth, to build life-long conservation stewards.

Volunteer Office The Volunteer Office is located in El Portal in the NPS Maintenance Complex. The VIP office staff are more than happy to assist you with anything that you might need while volunteering in the park… volunteer forms, uniforms, information or welcome packets. There’s also a bookcase in the hallway with Volunteer forms. Feel free to drop by or call 209-379-1850 anytime during your time in Yosemite! You can also reach any office staff person at [email protected] Directions: From Hwy 140, turn onto Foresta Rd and cross over the Merced River, then bear right. From the parking lot at the first entrance, enter the building on the right side of the breezeway and go up the stairs. The Volunteer offices are at the top of the stairs, ahead and to the left. The Volunteer Program also has a Volunteer Field Office (VFO) in Yosemite Valley. This office is moving in March 2017, and the new location has not yet been determined as of this Handbook revision. Volunteer Program Staff:  Heather Boothe, Volunteer Programs Manager: Responsible for overall program management and policies. Primary contact for group volunteer activities.  Sally Kintner, Volunteer Program Assistant Coordinator: Responsible for office operations, information management, and communications. Primary contact for individual volunteer recruitment/placement.  Seasonal program assistants: assist with information management and program logistical support.  All program staff share both a phone number and email: 209-379-1850, [email protected]

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Resources Management Volunteer Program The Resources Management and Science Volunteer Office is located at the Vegetation and Ecological Resources offices in Old El Portal across the street from the post office. Molly Downer is the Volunteer Coordinator for RMS and may be reached at 209-379-3294 or [email protected] Facilities Management Volunteer Program The Maintenance Volunteer Program is undergoing staffing changes as of this Handbook update. The Maintenance Volunteer Program Coordinator reports to the Branch Chief for Buildings and Grounds, Hassan Corbin.

PURPOSE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PARK The purpose of Yosemite National Park has been articulated by a series of legislative actions. On June 30, 1864, Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias were granted to the State of California to… “be held for public use, resort, and recreation” to be… “Inalienable for all time.” On October 1, 1890, Congress established Yosemite National Park as a “forest reservation” to preserve and protect “from injury all timber, mineral deposits, natural curiosities, or wonders” within the park area, and to retain them in their “natural condition.” The Act specifically excluded Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Giant Sequoia Grove, leaving them under the jurisdiction of the State of California as provided for in the Act of 1864. A Joint Resolution of Congress on June 11, 1906, placed Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove within the park. Although promotion of visitor use was not specified in the Act of 1890, Yosemite National Park as a unit of the National Park System is administered according to the Act of 1916, namely to “conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such a manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.” Additional legislation has established the Tuolumne and Merced Wild and Scenic Rivers, the Yosemite Wilderness Area, and protection through the Endangered Species Act, Clean Air Act, Historic Preservation Act, and similar laws. Yosemite National Park has become world famous for its combination of high peaks, sheer granite cliffs, massive granite domes and monoliths, magnificent waterfalls, hundreds of lakes, clear streams and views, open meadows, world famous giant sequoia trees, and varied plants and wildlife. The Park is an icon of American history for many reasons, including:  Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias were the first scenic natural areas to be set aside by a national government for public benefit and appreciation.  Yosemite became the third national park on October 1, 1890.  The foundation of the Sierra Club and the conservation movement that this organization represents are part of the park’s rich legacy.  The giant sequoias are the largest living things on earth. The Grizzly Giant, located in Yosemite’s Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, is one of the largest trees in the world, by volume.  Yosemite Falls is the world’s fifth tallest waterfall.  El Capitan is one of the largest exposed monoliths of granite in the world, and the granite face of Half Dome has become a scenic icon recognized around the world.  The park contains over 1,500 species of plants including 26 locally rare, 18 rare, and one candidate threatened or endangered species.

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Yosemite’s wildlife includes endangered and threatened birds (peregrine falcon and bald eagle) and the great grey owl, which is an endangered species in California. The Park is also home to the endangered Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep, and the wolverine and the Sierra Nevada red fox are threatened populations in the state. It has been estimated that people have lived in this region for at least the past 8,000 years, and the known prehistoric trade routes through the area are among the most significant found in the Sierra Nevada.

LIVING IN YOSEMITE Living in a National Park is an incredible experience and a privilege. The following principles and practices depend more on attitude and awareness, although they are enforced as rules and regulations. Please respect and appreciate Yosemite’s wild places and their inhabitants by doing the following:  Store food properly to prevent bears and other wildlife from obtaining unnatural food.  Do not feed wildlife (including birds) or disturb wildlife by approaching too closely (typically 50 yards).  Avoid damaging live trees and plants; do not pick wildflowers.  Do not plant or transport the seeds of non-native plants in Yosemite. The Division of Resources Management and Science is actively trying to control or eradicate non-native invasive plant species from Yosemite.  Minimize use and impact from fires.  Do not bring firewood from outside the area into the park. This is to protect Yosemite from pathogens, such as Sudden Oak Death, and from the introduction of insect infestations.  Leave natural objects and cultural artifacts for others to enjoy.  Drive the speed limit and pay attention while driving on park roads to reduce the chances of injuring wildlife.  Use Leave No Trace ethics.  Please recycle

WHEN YOU ARRIVE Once you have been selected as a volunteer, discuss with your supervisor when you will arrive, your work schedule, and where you will be living. If you have been assigned to National Park Service housing, you must arrange to check into your housing (Housing Office is 209-379-1879). You will sign your Housing Agreement, as well as the General Terms and Conditions form. An inspection of the housing unit will be required of the tenant. A National Park Service representative will assess the general condition of the quarters, get you acquainted with your new home, and issue keys. Remember, you are responsible for the condition of the housing unit when you leave, and will receive a bill for excessive damage or if the unit needs cleaning. If you have been assigned a campsite, please check with your volunteer supervisor so you know to which campsite you are assigned, and make sure you understand the campground rules.

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BEARS The history of interactions between humans and black bears in Yosemite is a long one, marked by some periods that we now look upon as shameful. Early in the Park’s history, little was done to keep bears from becoming conditioned to human food. Garbage was readily available in developed areas, and not much was done to discourage visitors from feeding bears. The NPS maintained several “bear pits” in the park where bears were fed garbage in an attempt to keep them out of park campgrounds and lodging areas, and to provide visitor entertainment. Human injuries were common, and many bears were killed in the name of public safety. Thankfully, times have changed, and the emphasis is now on managing the behavior of humans to improve the behavior of bears. All outdoor garbage cans and dumpsters are bear-resistant. All campsites, parking lots, and major trailheads are equipped with bear-proof food lockers that allow visitors to remove food from their vehicles and store it safely. In recent years, increased staffing has enabled more patrols to detect and correct food storage problems and to provide visitor education. All park employees, partners, and volunteers have accepted larger roles in protecting bears, with diligence in emptying trash cans, dispensing information to visitors, and enforcing food storage regulations. As a result, human-bear incidents and property damage have been reduced by close to 90 percent since 1998. As a resident of the park, there are a number of things that you must do to assist in protecting bears:  Store all food and scented items in your home or in a food storage locker.  Keep all windows and doors closed and latched when you are gone.  Always check your vehicle to make sure there are no food, trash, or scented items inside.  Remove attractants from around your living area. Unwashed recycling, BBQ grills, bird feeders, pet food, and compost piles that contain kitchen scraps are all attractants that will draw a bear (and other wildlife) into the area.  Put all food trash and recycling in animal-resistant dumpsters or recycling containers and remember to clip the dumpster so bears cannot get inside. Only yard clipping and non-food trash items should be placed in the open-top dumpsters.  Scare bears from developed areas. Yelling, water from garden hoses, small marble-sized stones tossed near the bears, and banging together empty tin cans all work well in scaring bears away. If a bear perceives you as a dominant bear, it is more likely to avoid your residence. This works best if all bear attractants are removed.  When out enjoying the park, make sure to always keep your food within arm’s reach. Do not leave packs with food unattended, or leave food anywhere that wildlife can easily access it.  Inspire others to keep a clean park.  Use the Save-a-Bear hotline (209-372-0322) to report bear sightings, overflowing trash containers, improperly stored food, or other information about bears.

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THE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF YOSEMITE [Please see page 31 for phone numbers.]

Office of the Superintendent (AKA “Supt’s office”) The Office of the Superintendent is the executive office of the Park and includes the Superintendent, the Chief of Staff, Public and Legislative Affairs, the parkwide Safety Program, Hetch Hetchy Program Management, and the executive office staff. The Superintendent’s Office and the Park Executive Leadership Team (ELT) are responsible for overall park leadership, internal management directives and strategic direction, relationships with park cooperating associations and other partnerships, and relationships with a wide range of constituents such as Native American tribal governments, gateway communities, state and local governments, other government agencies, Congress and the Senate. Safety Office The Safety Office provides training, guidance, advice and best practices to ensure park compliance with all appropriate laws, regulations, and policies for employee safety and health. Its primary goal is to minimize the number of accidents and injuries. This office also houses a Public Health Service (PHS) representative who conducts inspections of food and grocery facilities in the park, and serves as a consultant on water-borne, zoonotic, and vector-borne diseases and their transmission. The Office of Public and Legislative Affairs The Office of Public & Legislative Affairs is responsible for responding to all press inquiries regarding Yosemite National Park from representatives of local, regional, national, and international print and broadcast media outlets. The staff serve as the park spokespeople and conduct interviews on park policy, planning efforts, park conditions, fires, floods, wildlife issues, and other events happening in the park. The office issues news releases and media advisories to the working press. It also provides public affairs counsel to the Superintendent and other members of the Park Management Team. Other duties include working with elected officials and their staffs on pending and current legislation and other legislative issues affecting the park and the National Park Service. They also work closely with the Regional and Washington Offices of Legislative Affairs. The office regularly hosts international delegations interested in Yosemite National Park management and other dignitaries visiting the park. They also produce special events which include visiting dignitary announcements, completed projects, naturalization ceremonies, and work completed by the Yosemite Conservancy. Before speaking to any member of the media or press, always consult first with the Public Affairs staff. Hetch Hetchy In 1913, President Woodrow Wilson signed the Raker Act into law, permitting the building of the O’Shaughnessy Dam, and flooding the Hetch Hetchy Valley within the confines of Yosemite National Park. So began the relationship between Yosemite National Park and the City of San Francisco. Yosemite National Park, in partnership with the City of San Francisco, works to preserve and protect the Tuolumne River and Eleanor Creek watersheds. Under the auspices of Five-Year Agreements, the City of San Francisco provides funding for the park to maintain these pristine watersheds through a variety of operational projects, environmental studies, and visitor education efforts. Land Resources office The Land Resources Program is responsible for the management of utility and land-use permitting, maintaining the park’s land records, boundary line management, land acquisition and disposal, private inholdings, and external adjacent lands. It also oversees non-commercial special use permits, including weddings, cremation scattering, and filming.

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Planning Division (AKA “Planning”) The Planning Division is responsible for creating management plans for park resources as required by the National Environmental Policy Act, Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, the Wilderness Act, and similar legislation. Part of their responsibility is ensuring that the public is involved in these planning processes.

Division of Project Management (AKA “PM” or “Proj Mgmt”) The Division of Project Management is responsible for environmental planning and compliance and the design and construction of projects in excess of $500,000. This office was established following the 1997 flood as a short-term organization responsible for repair and rehabilitation of Yosemite’s flood-damaged facilities, and was originally known as the Office of Flood Recovery. While recovery was underway, the park’s design and construction project workload increased significantly through various fund sources. To avoid excessive collateral duties for other Divisions, and to provide consistent and efficient project management procedures, accountability for these projects was consolidated into what is now the Division of Project Management. The Division is comprised of three Branches.  Environmental Planning and Compliance  Project and Design Management  Construction Management (CM)

Division of Administrative Services (AKA “Admin”) The Administration Division enables all park employees to preserve and protect the natural and cultural resources of Yosemite National Park through collaborative and professional relationships, by providing guidance, expertise, and tools needed to fulfill responsibilities efficiently and ethically. Most Administration staff work out of the park’s offices in Mariposa. The Division of Administration is comprised of six branches.  Budget and Finance  Housing Management  Human Resources (HR)  Information Technology (IT)  Contracting and Procurement  Supply and Property Management (SPMB)

Division of Business and Revenue Management (AKA “BRM”) The Division of Business and Revenue Management combines the functions of concessions management, fee revenue management (including operations of campgrounds and entrance stations), and authorizing commercial park uses. Concessions Management The Concessions Management Branch (“Concessions”) oversees the operations of private businesses operating in the park under concession contracts. The primary contract, held by Aramark, operates lodging, retail, food service, and recreation programs. The Ansel Adams Gallery is the NPS’s oldest family-owned concessionaire, providing photography and arts education. The El Portal Market provides basic groceries for local residents and visitors.

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Fee Management The Fee Management Program (“Fees”) is responsible for the collection and oversight for visitor use fees in the park, including entrance fees, campgrounds, and special user fees. The office also manages the entrance stations and campgrounds. Commercial Uses The Commercial Uses program oversees commercial operators within the park who are not under concession contracts, including bus companies, guiding services, stock packers, etc.

Division of Facilities Management (AKA “FM” or “Maintenance”) Yosemite’s Division of Facilities Management is responsible for the operation and maintenance of roads, trails, buildings, housing units, grounds, and utility systems. The division is also responsible for managing and maintaining the park’s vehicle and equipment fleets. Beyond the routine operation and maintenance functions, engineering support, facilities inventories, energy use monitoring, mapping, surveying, and historic preservation are also Facilities Management Division responsibilities. Buildings and Grounds “B&G” is responsible for the facilities which employees and visitors use every day – the buildings we work in, the lawns and pathways, the restrooms and picnic areas, and campgrounds. They do everything from cleaning bathrooms and picking up trash to mowing lawns, repairing structures, installing new facilities, and making sure the park is safe for all. The program also includes the park’s Historic Preservation shop. Utilities The Utilities Branch is responsible for the park’s water, sewer, electrical, phone, and other utility systems, both in the front-country and in back-country areas. They provide the critical service of opening up utilities in high country locations each spring, then shutting them down carefully to ensure they aren’t damaged during winter. Design and Engineering Design and Engineering performs the planning and design work necessary to ensure park facilities comply with all applicable laws and are constructed safely and efficiently. They work on both large scale projects such as replacement of Valley-wide sewer lines and smaller projects, such as installation of a new vault toilet. Roads and Trails Yosemite has 214 miles of paved roads, 20 miles of surfaced bicycle trails, 800 miles of hiking trails, and countless parking areas. The Roads and Trails program is responsible for the design, construction, and maintenance of these facilities.

Division of Interpretation and Education (AKA “Interp” or “I&E”) Interpretation is the means through which the NPS helps visitors to make emotional and intellectual connections to the meanings inherent in park resources. Good interpretation is a bridge leading people into new and fascinating worlds, inspiring new understanding, new insights, new enthusiasm, and new interests. Interpretation facilitates vital components of the NPS mission—enjoyment, education, and inspiration. Field Operations The Field Operations Branch manages the services that most visitors associate with the “naturalist” ranger. They operate visitor centers, present formal and informal visitor programs, give special tours, rove trails, and generally help visitors to the park to connect to park resources.

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Education and Youth Services The Education program provides curriculum-based educational activities, both at Yosemite and beyond park boundaries, for youth (usually age 5 to 25). The program also facilitates several youth programs where young adults volunteers or experience the park, including the Yosemite Leadership Program (in partnership with UC Merced), Parks in Focus, Adventure Risk Challenge, and others. Creative Media The Creative Media staff creates the exhibits, brochures, park newspapers, web pages, videos, social media, and other items which help connect visitors to the park before, during, and after their visit. Museum Services The Museum Services branch manages the park’s museum, its extensive collections of natural and historic artifacts, the park research library, and the park’s archives, where the park’s history is maintained. Volunteer Program The Volunteer Programs Office is responsible for management of volunteers in all divisions in the park, establishing volunteer management policies, providing support for supervisors, and recruiting both individual and group volunteers. The program also manages Yellow Pine Administrative Campground.

Division of Resource Management and Science (AKA “RMS”) RMS provides the understanding, technical support, and scientific expertise to sustain the resources in a healthy, unimpaired condition for the benefit of present and future generations. RMS personnel accomplish these goals by developing the framework for sciencebased decision-making that aids in identifying issues and research needs, and mitigating threats that endanger animals, plants, air, water, soil, historic landscapes, historic structures, archeology and ethnographic resources. In addition RMS views its outreach role as critical in linking the public with park resources through science. History, Architecture and Landscapes (HAL) Responsible for researching and preserving the historic structures and landscapes of Yosemite, including several national historic structures and districts. Anthropology, and Archeology (AA) Responsible for researching and protecting the cultural ethnography of Yosemite through both historic research and preservation and cooperation with associated Native American peoples. Vegetation and Ecological Restoration (VER) Responsible for the plant life and the ecological landscapes on which they depend. The branch monitors and removes invasive plants, performs ecological restoration work to remove human impacts on the landscape, fosters the growth of native plants, and researches and monitors the ecological health of park landscapes. Physical Sciences and Landscape Ecology (PSLE) The park’s geologist, hydrologist, Geographic Information Specialist, Air Quality Specialist, and other staff monitor the park’s physical sciences.

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Wildlife Management (WILD) Wildlife staff work to understand and protect the park’s wildlife through research, monitoring, public education, and intervention. The Bear Management program works cooperatively across park divisions to ensure wildlife protection. Visitor Use and Social Sciences (VUSS) This program helps understand how visitors to the park interact with park resources, and gives the park the information necessary to balance quality visitor experiences with the protection of park resources.

Division of Visitor and Resource Protection (AKA “VRP” or “PROT”) This Division manages the Park’s law enforcement, jail and paralegal services, resources education and stewardship, emergency communications, and fire and fire prevention. The Protection Division is divided into four branches:

…To secure for the American people of present and future generations the benefits of an enduring resource of wilderness. …A wilderness…is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain. The Wilderness Act, 1964

Wilderness Yosemite’s designated wilderness makes up 94% of the park’s acreage. The Wilderness Branch is responsible for the management of this area. Its activities include wilderness planning, wilderness patrols, backcountry employee travel management, Wilderness permits (and the Wilderness Centers), Half Dome permits, Wilderness education, the UC Merced Wilderness Information Center, and the park climbing programs. Field Operations The Field Operations Branch, often referred to as Law enforcement or LE, is responsible for enforcing park rules and regulations. The branch oversees all LE operations, including LE patrols (front-country and backcountry), the Yosemite Jail, the park legal office, and criminal investigators. The branch also includes park emergency medical services, including search and rescue, ambulance, and the Yosemite Medical Clinic, operated in cooperation with the US Public Health Service. Communications The Communications Branch provides emergency communications as well as overseeing park communications operations, including maintenance of phone and radio systems. Fire and Aviation Management Fire management staff respond to fires within and outside the park and also work to maintain forest health and fire prevention through prescribed fires, fuel reduction efforts, and research into the ecological role of fire. The branch manages park aviation activities, including those to support both fire and SAR operations.

PARK PARTNERS The National Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout the United States and the world. An important avenue for achieving the National Park Service mission within Yosemite National Park depends on productive relationships among the National Park Service and Yosemite’s Primary Park Partner organizations. These include:

NatureBridge (previously known as Yosemite Institute)

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(AKA “NB”) This nonprofit organization provides experiential field science programs for children and adults. Programs strive to inspire a personal connection to the natural world and responsible actions to sustain it. NatureBridge provides one-day to week-long residential programs, primarily housing its participants in concessioner facilities in Yosemite Valley and at the Nature Bridge campus at Crane Flat (near the Tuolumne Grove). The organization is currently constructing a new environmental education campus at Henness Ridge (near Yosemite West).

The Yosemite Conservancy (AKA “YC” or “The Conservancy”) The Yosemite Conservancy was formed when the Yosemite Association and the Yosemite Fund merged into one organization in 2011. The Conservancy is dedicated to the support of Yosemite National Park through visitor services, publications, and donor activities. It is authorized by the NPS to solicit contributions for projects and programs to enhance the visitor experience and to protect, preserve, and restore Yosemite National Park. YC staff and volunteers assist Yosemite’s interpretive efforts at throughout the Park, and YC operates the Yosemite Outdoor Adventures program, offering the public courses on a wide range of topics such as natural history, birding, photography, botany, painting, literature, and backpacking. YC staff operate park bookstores throughout the park. The Conservancy also manages the Yosemite Theater Live program and the Art Center. The Conservancy offers many benefits to park volunteers, including free attendance at Theater, Outdoor Adventures, and art classes on a space-available basis.

Aramark at Yosemite As of March 2016, Aramark (operating as Yosemite Hospitality Services, LLC) serves as the park’s primary concessioner, providing lodging, food, guest recreation, interpretation, and retail services throughout Yosemite National Park. Yosemite Hospitality offers guided bus and tram tours, interpretive walks and demonstrations, programs for children and families, evening programs, photo walks, and guided hiking and climbing excursions.

The Ansel Adams Gallery (AKA “TAAG”) The oldest family-operated concessioner in the National Parks, The Ansel Adams Gallery cultivates an aesthetic appreciation and concern for the natural world by offering visitors a unique variety of books, handcrafts, fine arts, and access to the collection of Ansel Adams’ original photographs. The Gallery also leads photography walks and workshops in the field, as well as provides visitors with tours of its fine print room.

Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center The Sierra Club manages the historic Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center (formerly known as LeConte Lodge), providing a library, children’s corner, exhibits, and guided interpretive walks and evening programs. During the summer, the Center is host to special weekend interpretive presentations.

VOLUNTEER PROGRAM OPERATIONS The Yosemite Volunteer Program is managed under the Division of Interpretation and Education, but is a parkwide program, working with all park divisions and partners.

Who Can Volunteer? Almost anyone can be a volunteer in the National Park Service Volunteer in Parks (VIP) Program. A VIP is anyone who performs work for the National Park Service for which he or she receives no pay from the

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NPS, (reimbursement for out-of-pocket expense is not considered pay), and who has a current signed Volunteer Agreement (form 301A). The volunteer’s work must be directed by NPS staff and be assigned an NPS supervisor. It does not matter if the person is receiving pay, work credit, academic credit, or other types of compensation from sources outside the NPS; if the NPS is not paying that person for the work he or she is doing, he or she can be considered a VIP. Foreign nationals may serve as VIPs as long as they have a J-1 visa allowing them to volunteer in the U.S. Children under the age of 18 years may be VIPs provided they have the written consent of their parent or guardian (they may not stay in government housing without a legal guardian). Individuals convicted of minor crimes who are participating in court approved probation without sentencing, work release, or alternative sentencing programs can serve at the discretion of the Park Superintendent. However, no person who has been convicted of any violent crime, crime against persons, or crime involving use of a weapon shall be utilized in the NPS Volunteer in Parks program in any manner whatsoever. Volunteers are recruited and accepted from the public without regard to race, creed, religion, sexual orientation, age, sex, color, national origin or Office of Personnel Management classification laws, rules and regulations. But, they must be physically able to perform the work they volunteer to do. The Superintendent of the park may request that the volunteer complete a standard Form 256 (self-identification of medical disability) or obtain a medical examination at government expense, if there is a question regarding the volunteer’s ability to perform the assigned duties.

Employees and Family Members as VIPs An NPS employee can serve as a VIP within the NPS as long as the duties he or she performs as a volunteer are not the same type of duties for which he or she is paid. For example, a secretary in the superintendent’s office can volunteer to give an interpretive program in the park on his or her own time as a VIP, but cannot volunteer to do secretarial work for the chief ranger as a VIP. Relatives of NPS employees may serve as VIPs as long as the service representative signing the agreement for voluntary services is not an immediate family member. However, if reimbursement is involved, the regional ethics counselor should be consulted before any such agreement is signed. The creation of a conflict of interest could result if a family member of relative of an employee receives financial benefit from the program. Even the appearance of a conflict of interest is a violation of the department’s employee conduct regulations and should be avoided.

What Can Volunteers Do? Volunteers may work in any and all parts of the park. All levels and types of skills can be used, and almost any type of work can be performed as long as it is work that  Would not otherwise get done during a particular fiscal year because of funding or personnel limitations;  Enables paid employees to accomplish work that would not otherwise get done during a particular fiscal year because of funding or personnel limitations; or  Does not result in the displacement of any paid employees. The following additional constraints must be considered when assigning volunteers to work projects:  A volunteer must never be required to perform any type of work for which he or she is not qualified, has not been adequately trained, does not feel comfortable doing, or does not willingly agree to.  Volunteers who are assigned to operate machinery or equipment (such as chain saws, power shop tools, and specialized equipment or vehicles) first must have demonstrated their proficiency in the operation of that equipment to the satisfaction of the responsible supervisor. All applicable age restrictions

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relating to the operation of machinery or equipment must be considered. If certifications are required for NPS employees to perform a given task, the volunteer must also obtain those certifications. Volunteers may assist the visitor protection functions of the park. However, they must not be assigned duties that would place them in a life-threatening situation, even as an observer (for example, serving as backup on road patrol). Volunteers may not issue citations or carry firearms. Volunteers working in the Park must observe the same safety precautions and use the same safety equipment as do paid employees. If VIPs are to be placed in a work environment that has occupational hazards, then personal protective equipment must be provided at no cost to the VIP. Volunteers serving under the management of a park partner organization must be full members of that organization and be working towards standards and tasks formally established by the administering NPS office.

Protection of Volunteers While volunteers are not considered federal employees for most circumstances, there are three very specific areas where they are treated the same as federal employees. 

Worker’s Compensation: VIPs are entitled to first aid and medical care for on-the-job injuries as well as hospital care when necessary. When travel is necessary to receive medical care, transportation may be furnished and the travel and incidental expenses associated with it may be reimbursable. When death results from an on-the-job injury, burial and funeral expenses, not to exceed $800, may be paid. In addition, other compensation benefits may be approved by the Office of Workers Compensation Programs on a case-by-case basis. A VIP who suffers an on-the-job injury should contact his or her supervisor immediately. The supervisor is responsible for helping the VIP thoroughly document the incident. The supervisor is also responsible for helping the VIP obtain and complete the proper claim forms (if the volunteer desires to file a claim for compensation). The supervisor is responsible for certifying the authenticity of the claim and for submitting the claim to the servicing personnel office for processing. Specific information on this procedure and process, including information on the various forms that are required, can be obtained from the HR Specialist. All injuries should be reported, whether or not the volunteer seeks medical attention.



Tort Claims: This act provides a means whereby damages may be awarded as a result of claims against the National Park Service for injury or loss of property or personal injury or death caused by the negligent or wrongful act or omission of any employee of the NPS while acting within the scope of his or her office or employment under circumstances where the NPS, if it were a private citizen, would be liable for the claimant in accordance with the law of the place where the act or omission occurred. For example, if a volunteer damages personal equipment he has been authorized to use while volunteering (a car, camera, etc.), he may seek compensation under the Tort Claims Act.



Liability (also part of Tort Claims): Since VIPs are considered employees for the purpose of this act, they are offered the protection of the Act for personal liability as long as they are within the scope of their assigned responsibilities. For example, if a volunteer builds a trail, and a visitor later injuries herself on that trail, then sues the volunteer for poor construction, the volunteer is covered for liability.

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VOLUNTEER RIGHTS Volunteers have the right to: 1. Receive the same fair personnel practices as paid staff. 2. Have their time used effectively. 3. Receive clear and non-conflicting guidance and direction. 4. Be kept informed of activities pertaining to their volunteer assignments. 5. Not undertake assignments they do not wish to do. 6. Receive appropriate orientation, training and supervision. 7. Be assigned jobs that are worthwhile and challenging. 8. Be made aware of the overall operation of the park. 9. Have opportunities for growth. 10. Be offered a variety of experiences. 11. Receive regular, clear feedback on the quality and effectiveness of their work. 12. Be recognized for their contributions. 13. Have an opportunity to provide input into the volunteer program. 14. Be trusted with the information needed to carry out their jobs effectively. 15. Be assigned a direct supervisor.

VOLUNTEER RESPONSIBILITIES Volunteers have the responsibility to: 1. Represent the National Park Service in a professional manner. 2. Follow the park’s policies and guidelines and understand its organizational structure. 3. Seek and accept the guidance and support needed to complete assignments. 4. Work as a team with paid staff and respect mutual roles. 5. Be reliable in fulfilling assignments. 6. Do a quality, professional job. 7. Respect access to information, facilities and equipment, etc. 8. Learn from and participate in training sessions and meetings. 9. Provide notice of absence. 10. Make a good-faith effort to resolve differences or problems. 11. Care for park resources. 12. Work safely and smartly.

Ethical and Professional Behavior In the context of your volunteerism with the National Park Service, ethical behavior refers to avoidance of conflicts of interest between public duties and responsibilities and private activities. A few rules of ethical behavior that apply to volunteers include:     

Do not use Government property for personal purposes (i.e. you may not use a government-owned GIS device to map the land around your personal property). Do protect and conserve Federal property and obey all rules and regulations regarding its use. Do not use Government-owned, leased or rented vehicles for non-official purposes. The mandatory penalty specified for violation is termination. Do not sell commercial products in a government building, (items approved for sale by government are the exception). You may not operate a business within the park without a business permit. Do not solicit or accept anything of monetary value including gifts, gratuities, favors, entertainment or loans.

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Do not give preferential treatment to commercial businesses aside from park partners (i.e. you shouldn’t recommend a specific restaurant or hotel in Mariposa) Be respectful when discussing park partners; the public is always listening.

SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY It is the policy of Yosemite National Park to adhere to Federal guidelines and Bureau policy relating to sexual harassment. We as Federal employees and volunteers have a responsibility for maintaining high standards of conduct in the work place; therefore, sexual harassment has no place and will not be tolerated or condoned. Every effort should be made by manager, supervisors, employees and volunteers to ensure that all of us work in an environment free from sexual harassment. Sexual harassment is verbal comments, (i.e. calling people honey, darling, etc. or commenting of physical appearance) gestures, and physical contact of a sexual nature that are deliberate or repeated and unsolicited. Sexual harassment is also defined as sexual advances and requests for sexual favors, which are unwelcome. If you feel that you have been sexually harassed, please contact your supervisor, the Volunteer Program Office, or the Regional EEO Officer.

FIREARM POLICY Under 43 C.F.R. § 20.511, Departmental volunteers in the course of their official duties are prohibited from possessing firearms on property under control of the Department. Because of the stated purpose of the sponsors of Section 512 to provide uniformity under applicable state law from bureau-to-bureau, the potential liability issues that could result, and the absence of any criminal penalties applicable to this regulation, this Departmental policy continues to apply to all NPS/FWS employees and volunteers during their official duties. Volunteers who are not on official duty may possess firearms on Departmental lands under the same conditions applicable to members of the general public, according to P.L. 111-24, Section 512. For this purpose, volunteers are considered the same as other employees when engaged in their official activities. If you have any questions about the firearm policy, talk to your supervisor.

USE OF A VIP’S PERSONAL EQUIPMENT Whenever possible, volunteers should use government-owned equipment and property in their work, rather than using their own personal property. However, if a volunteer does use his or her own personal property or equipment for official purposes, and that property is lost, damaged or destroyed in the process, the volunteer may file a claim for reimbursement for the lost through the Tort Claim system. Title 16 U.S.C. – 18i (d) deals with the reimbursement to volunteers for personal property that was lost, damaged or destroyed while being used for official purposes for the National Park Service. In order to be eligible under this act, the VIP must have been required by an authorized NPS employee to furnish his or her own personal property for use in the assigned work. A statement to this effect must be included on the VIP Agreement Form (301A) and must specifically identify and describe the personal property involved and state that the volunteer is required to provide and use this particular equipment as part of his or her official duties. For these reasons, it is imperative that VIPs have a properly completed Volunteer Agreement and operate under written job descriptions that contain specific information on the type of work they are assigned to do. This is necessary in case questions arise about whether a VIP was acting within his or her assigned responsibilities. Volunteers should have access to their position description (PD) and can ask their supervisor for a copy of it at any time. Their PD should be reviewed and must reflect all aspects of the work that the VIP is assigned to do. If the PD does not include some assigned duties, this VIP should check with her or her supervisor so that it may be updated.

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VOLUNTEER AGREEMENT FORM 301A The single most important document that a volunteer must complete is the Volunteer Agreement, form 301A. Without a Volunteer Agreement, a volunteer will NOT be covered for any of the protections previously discussed. The volunteer must sign a separate agreement for each different volunteer position. Thus, a volunteer may have more than one Volunteer Agreement in effect during a given year. An example of this would be a volunteer who works 4 days a week in the Visitor Center and decides to work for one evening on the Bear Crew, (in this case, two volunteer agreements would need to be on file). Each volunteer agreement must have a corresponding position description on file.

TIMESHEETS It is important that VIPs keep track of their hours. The volunteer office records volunteer hours in order to give recognition for the number of hours a volunteer has contributed and also to give accurate quarterly totals for the NPS volunteer budget appropriations. Timesheets are available from the VIP supervisor or from the volunteer office. Once completed, timesheets may be faxed or interoffice mailed to the volunteer office. OR, the volunteer supervisor may email total hours worked each month to the volunteer program office. If a volunteer is being reimbursed for meals or mileage, they must complete a timesheet for each month worked, which needs to be signed by the supervisor and attached to a reimbursement claim form. If a volunteer is not being reimbursed, it is up to the supervisor to decide how hours should be tracked and reported monthly. Please check with your supervisor about tracking your hours. Volunteer hours must be reported to the volunteer office each month, by the 10th day of the following month.

PER DIEM AND REIMBURSEMENTS Yosemite National Park’s Executive Leadership Team has established a park-wide Volunteer Reimbursement Policy. In Yosemite, a limited number of volunteers are eligible for reimbursements for meals, travel, and other incidental expenses. If you are interested in learning more about volunteer reimbursements, please contact your supervisor or the volunteer office staff. There are important forms that are required for getting reimbursement including a Direct Deposit form and a Claim for Reimbursement form. Generally, volunteers working fewer than 30 days full time will not be eligible for reimbursement, and volunteers who commute from their own homes may not receive per diem. The Volunteer Program does not have any legal obligation to provide reimbursement to volunteers for any purpose. Please note if you are seeking reimbursements you must turn in receipts.

VOLUNTEER STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOPS) AND POLICIES Volunteer Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) have been established through Yosemite’s Volunteer Leadership Team (VoLT) and approved by the Superintendent. SOPs detail specific volunteer policies and are available for volunteers, interns and staff. The following SOPs and Policies are available in the Volunteer Office or on SharePoint:  VIP Travel  VIP Uniform

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VIP Recognition Plan Yellow Pines Volunteer Campground / Housing SOP Yosemite Directive on Volunteer Reimbursement Group cancellation policy

VOLUNTEER UNIFORM Volunteers who will be in contact with the public are required to wear the standard volunteer uniform. Volunteers should not wear any part of the green and grey NPS uniform or be dressed in a manner that attempts to duplicate its appearance. Volunteers who are not in regular public contact may be in uniform, or may wear professional non-uniform attire approved by their supervisors. Uniform shirts and ball caps may be obtained in the VIP uniform cache, through the VIP office, or through your division VIP coordinator. Knit hats, jackets, and t-shirts must be requested from the VIP office. Jackets must be returned at the end of the season. All other items the volunteer may keep, or, if the items are in good condition, they may be returned to the VIP office for re-use. The Yosemite volunteer uniform is comprised of:  Shirts: Tan or khaki with volunteer patch on left shoulder or chest. The shirts come in four styles: o Short-sleeve polo shirt o Short-sleeve button-down o Long-sleeve button-down o T-shirt (for maintenance/field work only)  Ball cap: tan or khaki with VIP patch. With approval from their supervisors, volunteers may also purchase their own wide-brim, visor, or other hats in a tan color and affix the volunteer patch. Patches are available from the VIP Office.  Knit hat: black knit hats with VIP patch. These are available for volunteers working in the winter or in the locations that are cold during the summertime.  Nametag – nametags are provided by supervisors and should always be worn with uniforms. They may be purchased from the NPS Uniform vendor (supervisors should purchase using a government credit card).  Brown, khaki, black or charcoal gray pants. Blue jeans may be acceptable; ask your supervisor for their preference. The VIP may be reimbursed up to $75.00 for uniform pants purchased, (receipts required).  Jackets. The VIP office has two jacket options, each of which must be returned at the end of the season: o Three-season jacket: tan jackets with nylon exterior and fleece lining. Note: these are being replaced by the 3-in-1 winter jacket, so not all sizes may be available. o Three-in-One all seasonal jacket: black jackets with Gore-Tex shell and zip-out fleece liner  Footwear: closed toed shoes must be worn and, depending on the position, hiking boots are more appropriate. Brown color boots are preferred. Volunteers provide their own footwear. However, supervisors may purchase specialized footwear for volunteers when necessary for safety.

ORIENTATION AND TRAINING Volunteer orientation and training is the responsibility of the individual supervisor. However, the volunteer is responsible for letting their supervisor know what training they feel that they need in order to be successful in their position. Volunteers will be trained on specific job duties as well and provided with general orientation to

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Yosemite. For volunteers serving during the summer months, they are invited to attend the orientation for seasonal employees, given at the beginning of every summer season. Check with your supervisor to see when the next seasonal orientation training is. If at any time, a VIP is doing a position that they feel inadequately trained on, they are encouraged to contact their volunteer supervisor or the Volunteer Program Office.

HOUSING Full-time volunteers may receive free housing in the form of an apartment, house, trailer pad, or campsite. Houses and apartments are furnished, but do not include sheets or towels. Due to a shortage of housing at the park, houses or apartments are usually shared. There are cases in which housing cannot be provided due to lack of funds or lack of availability – it will be the potential volunteer’s decision as to whether or not to take the position if there is no housing available. Each supervisor must arrange housing for his or her own volunteers and all issues concerning housing are handled by the supervisor.       

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Government housing requirement. Volunteer-in-Parks must work a minimum of 32 hours weekly (64 hours biweekly) to be eligible for government housing. Some positions may require 40 hours / week. Overnight guests are not allowed. Units are to house assigned employees and volunteers only. Quiet hours are from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. Always keep in mind that you may be rooming with someone who works nights and sleeps during the day. Loud music, conversations, outdoor games and noise in general are to be curtailed by 10 p.m. Smoking. In order to promote a safer environment and to prevent smoke damage to government property, smoking is not permitted in government housing. Smoking is not permitted within 25 feet from the building. Pets are not permitted in any temporary/seasonal housing unit per the “Yosemite Pet Policy.” Satellite dishes and slack lines are not permitted in seasonal housing. Housing forms / check-in. Occupants must sign a Form 10-380, Housing Assignment Agreement, and complete a Housing Inspection Form with an NPS representative at the time of occupancy. If lead paint is present in the assigned unit, a Lead-Based Paint Disclosure Form must also be signed and on file in the Housing Office. Vacating housing / check-out. Persons must vacate housing within two (2) days of the end of their appointment or termination date. Please notify the Housing Office 10 days in advance to schedule the check-out inspection of your assigned housing unit. Government property. Occupants are accountable for keys, furniture, and other property assigned to each unit. All furnishings, appliances and utensils must remain in the unit. Do not remove or loan out. A bill will be issued for lost keys, damage to the unit, or other government property. Service calls. Occupants should promptly report service calls to the Facilities Management Customer Service Center. For after-hour emergencies, please contact Park Dispatch. o Facility Management Customer Service Center: 209-379-1058 o Park Dispatch: 209-379-1992 Telephone Service and internet . Volunteers may install telephone lines in most housing units, at their own expense. AT&T: (800) 310-2355 Television. In El Portal and some other limited locations, volunteers may install cable or satellite TV service at their own expense: TV (Mariposa) (209) 742-7822 OR through a satellite dish provider Questions. Call the Housing Management Office in Mariposa at (209) 379-1839 or 379-1879 with any questions and/or assistance.

Campground Information Some full time volunteers stay in campsites for the duration of their service in the park. In order to receive a free campsite, volunteers must serve a minimum of 32 hours per week (or more, depending on the position).

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Each campground in the park has different rules. You may get a copy of your specific campground rules from the information kiosk at the entrance to the campground. Remember that as a volunteer, you are a representative of the park so please be courteous and respectful of your neighbors; they are looking to you as a model of behavior.

SAFETY “Think Twice; Work Safe.” More than a slogan, at Yosemite National Park we have made employee and volunteer safety our highest priority. A few years ago, Yosemite National Park had a very high rate of occupational accidents and injuries. At the time, we thought that this was unavoidable due to the range of dangerous activities that many of us perform during our daily duties in the park. Work involving chain saws, power and hand tools, aviation programs, vehicle use in icy or snowy conditions, encounters with large animals such as bears, rapidly changing adverse weather conditions— all present serious hazards to National Park Service employees and volunteers. However, we no longer accept that these hazards cannot be controlled, and our stance is that all mishaps are preventable if we work together to address them as a team. Safety is everyone’s job. Before you begin any task, please ask your supervisor for the Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) that should be completed for all tasks. Read the JHA and think about what and how you are doing that particular task. Be aware of the hazards and wear all protective equipment that is designed and prescribed for the task. Use the right tool for the job at hand and be aware of hazards that might arise as you do the task, thinking about how you will respond if an unsafe situation arises. Supervisors are responsible for providing a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and volunteers, as well as safe working equipment, procedures, and conditions. You, as a volunteer, are responsible for following safe practices. Specific safety training will be given to all employees and volunteers as part of our regularly scheduled safety training program and on an asneeded basis as well. To assist employees, volunteers and supervisors, Yosemite National Park has developed safety policies. These policies are on the park’s SharePoint site; if you do not have access to this intranet site, please ask your supervisor for a copy of the parks safety policy. Safety comes first at Yosemite. The Superintendent has empowered any park employee to stop a job if the employee believes a hazard has not been controlled. If, while performing your duties, you come upon what you believe to be an unsafe situation, you have the responsibility to stop all work and speak with your supervisor to correct the situation. This includes observation of other members of your work crew that are acting in an unsafe manner. Employees and volunteers also have the right to file a “Report of Unsafe or Unhealthful Conditions,” and may be filed anonymously. However, it is often helpful for quicker resolution of the unsafe condition if the Safety Manager/staff is able to elicit further information from the person filing the report, and if requested, the originator’s identity will be kept confidential. Finally, you should know that many excellent safety suggestions come from employees and your suggestion or observation can make a difference, so you are encouraged to contact your supervisor, your Division Safety Representative or the Park Safety Manager/staff if you have suggestions that may improve working conditions, protect equipment and property, or protect yourself and fellow workers. You may reach the Park Safety Office by dialing, (209) 379-1064.

If You Experience a Mishap If you are injured or have a “near-miss” (including injuries to you or property damage), report it to your supervisor immediately and document what happened. Always keep in mind that, while in the backcountry, advanced medical services can be miles away, so be aware of the location of nearest first aid kit and emergency medical service provider. If you are involved in a mishap or incident resulting in personal injury, occupational illness, or property damage, you must promptly report all the facts and circumstances to your immediate supervisor, who will then enter the information into the Safety Management and Information System (SMIS).

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An Accident/Incident Report (Yose-134) will be completed by your supervisor in all cases involving work injury or death, accidental injury or property damage involving the public, any fire, any accidental damage to departmental property, or student/volunteer accidents. Yosemite Medical Clinic: Always call 911 if you are having an emergency. Emergency Medical Services are available throughout the park 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The clinic is located at 9000 Ahwahnee Drive in Yosemite Valley, between Yosemite Village and The Majestic Yosemite Hotel (formerly The Ahwahnee) Summer: Daily, 9 am to 7 pm Mid-May through mid-September Fall, Winter, and Spring: Monday through Friday, 9 am to 5 pm Mid-September to mid-May Services Primary Care  Physical exams  Well child exams  Chronic disease management  Immunizations Urgent Care  Illness evaluation and treatment (colds, flu, and infections)  Injury care (fractures, sprains, strains, cuts, abrasions) Employee Health  Workers' compensation  Employment physical exams  Employer-ordered testing  Commercial driver license physicals Laboratory Services  A limited array of lab tests can be performed onsite. Other lab tests are sent to an offsite lab. Radiology services (X-ray)  Basic X-ray services are available onsite. Referral is made for radiology services that are not performed onsite. Contact Information 209/372-4637 (phone) 209/372-4330 (fax) Dental care is available in surrounding communities. Major hospitals and specialists are found within a 2-hour drive of the park. Mariposa, Oakhurst, and Mammoth Lakes have medical clinics and some specialists. Sonora is fully established with a full range of medical services. Merced and Fresno offer full hospital services.

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CONCESSION DISCOUNTS Yosemite Hospitality offers a “Loyalty Card” to local residents, volunteers, and employees. These cards provide 10% off dining, retail outlets, and some services in the park. Volunteers will qualify for a Loyalty Card based on volunteer status if:  They have a valid signed volunteer agreement for the current year OR are an SCA or similar partner intern with a valid task agreement AND  They are scheduled to work at least 100 hours in a calendar year. Volunteers are eligible for reimbursement for the cost of the Loyalty Card if:  They are working full time (32 hours+ per week) for at least 4 weeks, AND  They are living away from home overnight (this is an IRS regulation for reimbursement of “meals and incidentals”). Note: while volunteers are eligible if they meet these two qualifications, each NPS program will determine if they choose to reimburse for the card. The NPS is not required to pay for or reimburse for the card. The NPS may not pay for the cards directly using NPS funds; the volunteer must purchase the card and then request reimbursement. Payment for Loyalty Cards using non-government funds: If a supervisor wishes to purchase Loyalty Cards for their volunteers using eligible non-NPS/government funds, they may do so regardless of whether volunteers meet the reimbursement eligibility above. To obtain a card, the supervisor or volunteer must request an authorization letter from the volunteer office. The volunteer takes the authorization letter to the Aramark HR offices to obtain the card.

GETTING AROUND Many volunteers arrive in the park with their own personal transportation, while others rely on public transportation to get themselves in and around the park. Please check with your volunteer supervisor to see whether or not a personal vehicle is required for your position. Since Yosemite is so large, many volunteers enjoy the freedom of having their own personal vehicle with them for the duration of their stay so that they may enjoy exploring remote locations of the park at their leisure. Others have luck meeting new friends and catching rides with volunteers or NPS employees on their days off. Whether you have a car with you or not, this section will give you an idea of how you can get around the park and the area using various modes of transportation.

Personal Vehicles If you have decided to bring your personal vehicle to the park, you will receive a vehicle

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pass or sticker, which will get you into Yosemite for free for the duration of your stay. Volunteers serving fewer than 60 days: you will be issued a paper gate pass. To obtain the pass: 1. You must have a completed volunteer agreement on file. 2. Provide the Volunteer Program Office with 1) Volunteer’s full name, 2) volunteer position title 3) start date, 4) end date 3. The volunteer office will issue the pass to you either via email or interoffice mail. Volunteers serving 60 days or more: you will be issued a seasonal vehicle sticker, which expires at the end of a calendar year. To obtain the pass: 1. You must have a completed volunteer agreement on file. 2. Provide the Volunteer program office with 1) your full name and job title, 2) a copy of your vehicle registration, either in person or a copy via email/fax, and 3) if the vehicle is registered in the name of someone other than the volunteer, an explanation. 3. The Volunteer Office will issue the sticker and give to the volunteer either in person or via interoffice mail to the supervisor. 4. The sticker should be placed in the lower left-hand corner of the vehicle windshield. Once you have your car pass or vehicle sticker, you are allowed to use the employee lane (if available) at Park entrances/exists. Please be sure to stop at the stop signs and wave at the Ranger at the gate. This allows them time to see your sticker / pass and wave you through. Park roads may close during the year due to snow, rock-fall, traffic accidents, etc. Tioga Road and Glacier Point Road are closed in winter months. All roads are subject to closure at any time. For road and weather information, call (209) 372-0200, then press 1, and 1 again.

Bicycles Yosemite encourages people to bike or walk to work. You are more than welcome to bring your personal bike with you for the duration of your volunteer position. If you can’t bring your bike, but are interested in borrowing one while you’re here, please contact the Volunteer Office about participating in the BikeShare program.

YARTS The Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System (YARTS) serves communities in Mariposa, Merced, and Tuolumne, Fresno, Madera, and Mono counties; all routes travel to or through Yosemite Valley. Visit the YARTS website at www.yarts.com or call (877) 989-2787 between 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. Pacific Time. Volunteers should contact their supervisor to see if they may be issued a YARTS pass for commuting while volunteering. If the volunteer is eligible, the supervisor may purchase the card directly from a YARTS bus driver using a government credit card (with purchase authority), or the volunteer may purchase the pass and seek reimbursement. Volunteers should be issued 20-ride commuter passes rather than monthly passes.

Yosemite Valley Shuttle and Tuolumne Shuttle Once inside Yosemite Valley, there is a free shuttle that serves all of the popular locations, restaurants and trailheads in the Valley. We encourage you to park your car and ride the free shuttle! In summer months there are also backpacker shuttles (for a fee) to the various trailheads on Tioga Road leaving from Yosemite Valley. In summer months, a shuttle also runs from Tioga Pass to Olmstead Point in Tuolumne Meadows. Check the latest version of The Guide for schedules and fares.

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Amtrak Amtrak serves Yosemite via a connection to YARTS at the Merced Amtrak station. Call 800/872-7245 for information and reservations.

Airports The closest airport to Yosemite Valley is the Fresno-Yosemite International Airport (“FAT”, approximately 22.5 hours from Yosemite Valley) and there is a small airport in Merced as well. Modesto, Sacramento and the San Francisco Bay Area airports are all within 3.5-4 hours from the park. A cheaper alternative to airport parking is offered at local hotels in Fresno. Check with individual hotels regarding this service.

Road and Vehicle Information Gas Stations Due to the remote location of Yosemite, gas is usually a bit more expensive inside the park than in the outlying towns. It’s always a good idea to have plenty of gas in your car when you enter the park since you might have a long drive between gas stations. 

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Yosemite Valley – Employee- and Resident- only gas pumps are located near the search and rescue building (just north of the Administrative Building and cemetery). In order to pump gas there, you must get a pin number at the Garage in the Valley. Be sure to have a credit card (for payment) and some form of ID with you to show proof that you’re an NPS volunteer. Gas is usually cheaper here than in other locations in the park. This station is not open to the public. Wawona – The gas station in Wawona is located near the market and hotel. It accepts credit cards and is a 24 hour self-serve station. Tuolumne Meadows – No gas in Tuolumne Meadows as of 2016. Crane Flat – This station is located at the junction of 140 and 120. El Portal – 24 hour self-serve station is located near the market on 140 in El Portal.

Valley Garage There is one mechanic shop in the park. It is located behind the Village Store. 209-372-8320 Road Closure Information Occasionally roads close in the park due to various reasons: fire, flood, rockfall and downed trees. For up-todate road closure information, please call 209-372-0200, then 1, 1. For road conditions outside the park, you can call Cal Trans at: 800-427-7623. Mountain Driving Tips  Obey posted speed limits. Slow down when road conditions warrant. Be alert to rocks on the road and wildlife crossings.  Stay on your side of the road, especially on tight curves; do not pass unless it is safe and legal to do so.  Be courteous. Pull into turnouts to allow vehicles to pass.  Shift into lower gear when roads are steep and slippery. Pump your brakes to stop (unless you have anti-lock brakes). Avoid excessive slowing on curves or your vehicle may slide.  Keep an eye out for rocks on roads – at any time of the year, but especially during and after rain storms. Winter Driving Tips and Chain Requirements  Winter road conditions may change suddenly. Wet asphalt may be slippery or icy, especially in shady spots and on bridges.

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  

Carry tire chains in your vehicle in winter; they could become mandatory at any time. This includes chains for 4-wheel drive vehicles. Anticipate snowplows, as they may be working just around the next curve. Wait for a signal from the plow driver before passing. Melting water from roadside snow banks often freezes on road curves during early evening hours, creating treacherous “black ice.” This can occur when the weather appears dry and fair.

Chain Requirements Snow tires okay. All 2-wheel and 4-wheel drive vehicles must use chains unless the vehicle has snow tires on the drive axle. Snow tires must have a manufacturer’s M&S designation on the tire, R1 indicating they are mud and snow tires. Upon entering an activated chain control area, state law requires all vehicles to carry chains. 4-wheel drive with snow tires excepted. All 2-wheel drive vehicles must use chains, even if equipped with M&S rated tires. Only 4-wheel drive vehicles with designated M&S snow tires on R2 all drive axles are excepted. These excepted vehicles must carry chains when entering a chain control area. No exceptions, all vehicles must use chains. Local residents – please note: 4-wheel drive vehicles R3 must carry chains while in R1, R2, and R3. The speed limit when chain control is in effect is 25 mph (Once park roads are classified as R3, they are often closed)

MAIL There is no home delivery of mail in Yosemite National Park (except Hodgdon Meadow) or in the administrative site of El Portal. Post Office mailboxes are available for rent at the post offices in Yosemite Valley, Wawona, and El Portal. During the summer, limited mail service is available at Tuolumne Meadows. To request a post office box, apply in person or by writing in advance to the Postmaster. Most volunteers and seasonal staff have mail sent to them via “General Delivery” at the post office location closest to their housing. To pick up this mail, the volunteer must go to the post office during business hours and present an ID. Parcel delivery (UPS, FedEx, DHL, etc.) is available daily in most areas of the park and in outlying communities. Remember that you must have a physical address to send these types of packages to. Check with your supervisor to find out what address you should use. If you send a package to your work address, be sure to list the office name as well as your name; packages sent to people care-of the park with no designated office will be returned to sender. For general delivery US Postal Service mail, the addresses are: Yosemite Valley: Your Name c/o General Delivery (whichever post office it’s going to, Main Post Office, Yosemite Valley Lodge etc.) Yosemite, CA 95389 Wawona: (Post office is located inside the Market) Your Name c/o General Delivery Wawona, CA 95389 El Portal: (Located on Foresta Road in Old El Portal (next to the Community Hall) Your Name c/o General Delivery El Portal, CA 95318

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Tuolumne Your Name c/o General Delivery Tuolumne Meadows Post Office Yosemite, CA 95389

LOCATIONS OF VARIOUS BUILDINGS AND SERVICES Showers There are showers located in Half Dome Village (formerly known as Curry Village), at the Yosemite Valley Lodge Swimming Pool, at the Valley Wellness Center (must have a Loyalty Card), in the El Portal NPS Warehouse (free, but open only during business hours, Monday-Friday) -- in the restrooms nearest the Large Break Room, and in the restrooms directly below the Large Break Room. In Tuolumne, the showers are located at Bug Camp in the restroom/shower/laundry facility. In Wawona, showers are located at the end of the firehouse. You can access this building with a BF6 key or ask your supervisor for assistance.

Internet El Portal: Free Wi-Fi is available at the Community Hall and El Portal Library (at the school). The school prefers users not to access the Wi-Fi during school hours. Yosemite Valley: Volunteers may access computers in the Volunteer Field Office (new location TBD 2017) during business hours – generally Monday-Friday 9am to 4pm; if you have your own computer there is Wi-Fi available; ask Field Office staff for the password for access. Public Wi-Fi is available at the Yosemite Valley Lodge for a small fee. You may use computers at public libraries. Computer kiosks are available for a fee at Degnan’s Café. There is also wireless access at several coffee shops and businesses in gateway communities. To set up internet service in your housing unit, call AT&T for “Uverse” high speed internet: 800-310-2355.

Cell Phone Coverage Cell phone coverage in Yosemite is spotty. Verizon seems to work the best in the most locations around the park. You’ll have Verizon and Sprint service in El Portal (from Arch Rock Entrance Station to just east of the NPS Warehouse – best at the Post Office). Most carriers will work in parts of Yosemite Valley (best at park headquarters), at Glacier Point and in other locations on the rim of the valley. Verizon users will have service at Crane Flat and in Tuolumne Meadows and Big Oak Flat Entrance Station. There is very limited cell coverage in Wawona as well. Cell service is often impacted during daily peak visitation by the large number of people trying to access limited service; if you have four bars of service, but you can’t get a signal, this is why. Again, cell coverage depends on your phone, the cloud cover and other seemingly mysterious factors and is not always reliable.

Groceries Due to the added expense of transporting good into Yosemite, grocery stores in the park tend to be more expensive than in some of the larger stores in the outlying communities. For this reason, many volunteers choose to do their shopping outside the park.

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Yosemite Valley: The largest grocery store in the park with the most variety is called the “Village Store” and it is located east of the Visitor Center and Degnan’s Deli. There are also smaller stores located in Half Dome Village (formerly known as Curry Village) and at the Yosemite Valley Lodge for snacks and other basics. El Portal: The El Portal Market is a small grocery store that has just about everything you need while staying in the park from groceries to a small amount of household goods. They also offer deli sandwiches, coffee and donuts in the morning as well as DVD rentals. Tuolumne Meadows: There is a market in Tuolumne Meadows just east of the gas station. Wawona: The Wawona Market is located behind the gas station, just north of the Big Trees Lodge (formerly known as Wawona Hotel). There is also the smaller family-owned Pine Tree Market located in the housing area in Wawona on Chilnualna Road. Crane Flat: The gas station at Crane Flat has a small selection of groceries and supplies. Outlying Communities: There are large supermarkets in Oakhurst. Each has a pharmacy, bakery and florist. Mariposa has one large grocery store and several mini-markets. Fresno, Merced, and Modesto are major cities and have a variety of conveniences.

Propane Propane can be purchased at the following locations:  Yosemite Village Garage  Crane Flat gas station  Wawona gas station NOTE: Ask your supervisor if your program has a propane charge account for volunteers, and if you are eligible to use it.

Wellness and Fitness Centers We encourage employees to utilize the wellness centers in the park. They are available for free use, though there is a small fee for some group fitness classes. Yosemite Valley Wellness Center: This amenity is available for use by Aramark employees, and local residents are also welcome. It is located on the road to Half Dome Village (formerly known as Curry Village) at the concession housing area just east of the Yosemite Conservation Heritage Center. There you’ll find a changing room, showers, cardio equipment (stairs, elliptical, treadmills and bikes) as well as weights and other conditioning equipment. There is also a group fitness room which is used for classes (check the front desk for a schedule). Yoga mats and light weights are available for use, along with a TV, VCR and DVD player and a selection of work out videos. There is also a DVD rental area. El Portal Fitness Center: There is a fitness center (open 24 hours) located inside the NPS warehouse; it is accessible via a door in the back near the fire cache. Volunteers serving 30 days or more may use the fitness center. Talk to your supervisor

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if you would like to use this amenity. There are forms you’ll need to fill out before you receive the pass to get in. This may take up to a week. The fitness center has cardio equipment, weights, exercise mats and TVs for watching DVDs.

Swimming Pools There are swimming pools located at Wawona, the Yosemite Valley Lodge, and Half Dome Village (formerly known as Curry Village) in the Valley. You may need to pay a small fee; Loyalty Cards provide free access. There is also a public pool in El Portal located near the school. Pool hours are seasonal and vary. The park rivers are also popular swimming spots. Ask people who’ve been here for a summer and they can fill you in on the best spots. Keep in mind that the rivers can be unpredictable, so please be careful.

Laundry Laundry facilities are located throughout the park. Some of them have coin operated laundry detergent available while others require that you bring your own. All machines are coin operated and washers are $1.00 per load while dryers are $0.50-$1.00/ per load. Keep in mind that some of the dryers are a little older and may require more than one round to get your clothes completely dry. There are also clothes lines available at most of the housing areas in the park. Clothes dry quickly on a hot summer day!     

Yosemite Valley: Girls Club (in the back of the library), Housekeeping, Rangers Club (if you happen to live there) and at Camp 1 (near the Traffic Management trailers). If you don’t know where these places are, ask your supervisor or a coworker. El Portal: Motor Inn Cabin #15, Trailer Court Laundry hut, and in the basement of each apartment building on Barium Mine Road. Wawona: at the Firehouse. Tuolumne Meadows: There is a shower/bathroom/laundry facility available at Bug Camp Big Oak Flat: Located next to the Buildings and Grounds facility

Libraries Yosemite Valley There are two libraries located in Yosemite Valley: the Public Library, the NPS Research Library. The Public Library, located in the Girl's Club, is open four days a week: 209-372-4552. Access to computer and Internet training and support is available at the Public Library. The NPS Research Library is located on the second floor of the Valley District Building, next to the Visitor Center: 209-372-0280. A $25.00 refundable deposit is required to check out books. El Portal The library in El Portal is located between the school and the swimming pool on the school grounds, (on Rancheria Flat Road). Hours vary from season to season. Check with your supervisor or call the library for hours: 209-379-2401. Wawona The Bassett Memorial Library is located on Chilnualna Road. Hours vary from season to season. Check with your supervisor or call the library for hours: 209-375-6510. Mariposa County Libraries are on the web at: www.mariposalibrary.org

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Religious Services A variety of religious services are held in Yosemite Valley at the Yosemite Chapel and at other locations in and near the Park. Consult the Yosemite Guide for details.

Bank/ATM The Yosemite Credit Union is located in the Post Office Building in Yosemite Valley. The telephone number is 209-372-4750. There is an ATM located just outside the Art Center in Yosemite Valley (near the Village Store) and at the Yosemite Valley Lodge, the Majestic Yosemite Hotel (formerly known as the Ahwahnee), the Village Store and at Half Dome Village (formerly known as Curry Village). In El Portal there are ATMs at Cedar Lodge, Yosemite View Lodge, and the El Portal Market.

Recycling Stations Yosemite National Park and Aramark are dedicated to the recycling program and urge all employees to participate. Your assistance and cooperation with this commitment will benefit the Park and the planet. Plastic, certain metal products, and glass may be deposited in the bright green containers, which are located throughout the Park, in offices and in the housing areas. Yosemite recently acquired a crusher for propane bottle recycling. There are bins throughout the Park to collect used propane bottles. Please help spread the word that propane bottles should be discarded in the bins dedicated to this specific purpose. Note: For locations of other park amenities not mentioned here, refer to the latest edition of the Yosemite Guide, which can be obtained at any of the entrance stations in the park, or at the visitor center.

DAY-OFF OPTIONS We encourage volunteers in Yosemite to enjoy all of the events and activities that this park has to offer. As previously mentioned, you should pick up a copy of the latest Yosemite Guide which will point you in the direction of all of the park events and activities that are open and available to the public, (Free Art Classes in the valley, Yosemite Conservancy events, guided walks etc.). Yosemite is home to hundreds of people, including employees of several organizations, volunteers, and their families, so there is a great sense of community in the park… we hope that as a long-term volunteer, you feel that you are a part of this community as well. This section will give you some ideas of what you can do on your days off that aren’t mentioned in the guide. This is your “behind the scenes” look at what activities are going on in the communities in the park.

Yosemite Employee Association (YEA) and Community Hall Events The Yosemite Employee Association is open to employees, volunteers, and residents of Yosemite and El Portal. You can join the Yosemite Employee Association for $10. YEA holds numerous events throughout the year at the Clark Community Hall in El Portal and at other locations in and around the park. The most notable events held at the Community Hall include the Spring Fling (held in late April) and Oktoberfest (held in late September); and the Winter Formal at the Cedar Lodge in El Portal (held in mid-December). These events provide a great time to get out and mingle with other community members in the park. Sal’s Taco Night YEA also sponsors Sal’s Taco Night. Within your first few days in the park, you will probably hear all about Sal’s Taco Night from your coworkers. This event takes place every-other Thursday night in El Portal, (usually from 5:30-9 or 10). A taco truck from Mariposa braves the road between Mariposa and El Portal and parks at the Community Hall in Old El Portal, (located next to the Post Office on Foresta Road). They sell burritos, tacos and everything else that you can imagine a taco truck selling. At the same time, the Yosemite Employee

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Association (YEA) sells beverages and often arranges for live music. This is a great opportunity to get out and meet fellow volunteers, employees, and community members.

Concession Recreation Center Activities The Aramark Wellness Center offers a lot of great activities throughout the year and put out monthly calendars detailing events. Some of their activities include: group fitness classes, shuttles to the Mobil at Lee Vining, and other community activities in and around the park. They also do grocery shopping trips to outlying communities and other road-trips. Most of their events/activities and shuttles are free but check with the front desk staff to be sure.

Gateway Communities Just outside our park boundaries are small gateway communities such as Lee Vining and Fish Camp with services that often cater to park employees and visitors alike. Many have many more services than you might expect from their appearances – gas stations with live music, hotels with friendly bars, and coffee shops with free wi-fi. As this is a National Park Service document, we can’t recommend specific businesses here, so ask your neighbors and colleagues!

Group Yoga in El Portal A local non-profit, Balanced Rock Foundation (www.balancedrock.org) offers yoga classes twice a week for the community. Classes are usually held in the Community Hall next to the Post Office. Classes occur on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6:00-7:15pm. They are by donation; requested donation is $5.00 per class (or more, if you can afford it). The money goes to support scholarships to their programs. Mats are provided for use during the class and no experience is necessary! Be sure to let the instructor know if you are new to class so that you can sign a liability waiver form.

Hiking If you love to hike and enjoy the outdoors, there are plenty of options! El Portal Area. These are just a few of the hiking trails/locations in the area. Check with your supervisor or other volunteers or employees who have been exploring the area.  Incline Road: located along the north side of the Merced River going west from the El Portal Administration Building.  Foresta Road: From the El Portal Post Office, start heading up hill and out of town. The road continues more than 5 miles to the community of Foresta  Rancheria: At the top of Rancheria Flat Road an old road/trail continues up past the water tanks.  Hite’s Cove: Starts at the South Fork Bridge/Savage’s Trading Post. Yosemite National Park With over 800 miles of trails to explore, there’s always a new trail to tackle. The park visitor centers have free hiking maps of popular areas, and detailed hiking maps and guide books are for sale in several locations in the park. Forest Service and BLM Land Yosemite is surrounded by public lands managed by the BLM and Forest Service. You can get hiking maps of these areas from their agency offices or many of the local chambers of commerce.

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Fishing Licenses Fishing licenses are available year-round at the Village Sports Shop, the Wawona Store, and the El Portal Market and seasonally at the Tuolumne Meadows Store. Anyone 16 years or older must have a valid license. One adult accompanying a child under 16 years of age needs a license even though the adult may not be fishing. A license must be visibly displayed on clothing above the waistline. New fishing regulations reflecting Yosemite’s management goals of preserving and restoring native fishes and their habitats have been introduced. These special regulations pertain to the Merced River in Yosemite Valley, from the Happy Isles footbridge to the Pohono Bridge, and downstream to the Foresta Bridge in El Portal. In these reaches of the river it is catchand-release only for native rainbow trout and no bait fishing. Only artificial lures or flies with barbless hooks may be used. Brown trout limits are set at 5 fish per day, 10 in possession, and it is the responsibility of the angler to be able to identify fish species. Check out all regulations before beginning to fish. The fine is substantial for not knowing the law.

Volunteering with another Division or Branch Are you interested in career development and exploring other opportunities in the Park Service? Yosemite is home to a large volunteer and intern program with opportunities in all Park Divisions. Contact the Volunteer Office or your Divisional Volunteer Coordinator to discuss options for volunteering in another program within the Park during one or more of your days off.

Other places to find local events and activities… Check the bulletin boards at the El Portal Post Office, the El Portal Community Center, and the El Portal Market for fliers about local events and advertisements. You can also find activities posted in the Daily Report, which is available via NPS email or you can subscribe via the internet. Or, ask a local who’s been around for a while!

YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK ON THE WEB Yosemite National Park has quite the web-presence… from Facebook and Twitter, to government, concessionaire, and park partner websites! Yosemite National Park’s official website: http://www.nps.gov/yose Yosemite National Park’s official Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/YosemiteNPS/ Yosemite National Park’s official Twitter page: http://mobile.twitter.com/yosemitenps Yosemite NP’s Official Volunteer Web page: http://www.nps.gov/yose/getinvolved/volunteer.htm Yosemite NP’s Volunteer Facebook Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/994370813969921/ NPS Volunteer’s official website: http://www.nps.gov/getinvolved/volunteer.htm NPS Volunteer’s official Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/npsvolunteers Yosemite Conservancy’s website: http://www.yosemiteconservancy.org/ Yosemite Conservancy’s Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/yosemiteconservancy Aramark’s Yosemite website: http://www.travelyosemite.com Aramark’s Yosemite Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/YosemitePark NatureBridge Yosemite: http://www.naturebridge.org/yosemite

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IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS Frequently Used NPS Phone Numbers (area code 209) Emergencies Park Dispatch Volunteer Office RMS Volunteer Office IT Help Desk Campground availability El Portal B&G Valley B&G

911 379-1992 379-1850 379-3294 379-1123 372-0266 379-1076 372-0545

Housing Office Employee Emergency Hotline Human Resources Bear Hotline Public Information Office Road Conditions Mather B&G Wawona B&G

379-1879 379-1186 379-1878 372-0322 372-0356 372-0200. Then 1, 1 379-1931 375-9508

Community Listings (area code 209) Ansel Adams Gallery Campground Reservations Credit Union Day Care - El Portal Day Care - Yosemite Degnan’s Deli El Portal Elementary School Yosemite Chapel Library (Public) Lost and Found (NPS) Lost and Found (concession) El Portal Library Mariposa County High School Mariposa County Library Public Information Office Road Conditions (Cal-Trans)

372-4413 800-436-7275/ (877) 444-6777 372-4750 379-2860 372-4819 372-8454 379-2382 372-4831 372-4552 379-1001 372-4357 379-2401 742-0260 966-2140 372-0356/0269 800-427-7623

U.S. Geological Survey U.S. Magistrate

379-1306 372-0320

U.S. Post Office (El Portal) U.S. Post Office (Yosemite-Main) Valley Visitor Center Wawona School YARTS Yosemite Elementary School Yosemite Haircare Yosemite Medical Clinic Yosemite Park High School

379-2311 372-4475 372-0299 375-6383 877-98-YARTS 372-4791 372-1206 372-4637 372-2414

Park Partners Aramark Yosemite Conservancy NatureBridge

372-1000 379-2376 379-9511

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WHAT TO DO IN THE CASE OF AN EMERGENCY Remain calm. Call 911. If you are out of cell range or do not have access to a telephone, find someone who can call for you or do your best to find help. Follow basic first-aid procedures to the level for which you have been trained. If it is a park-wide incident, contact the employee hotline at 209-379-1186. To prepare for emergencies, talk with your supervisor about how you will communicate in the event of an emergency.

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Yosemite National Park - National Park Service

Yosemite National Park Volunteers in Parks Handbook Revised 01/2017 WELCOME TO YOSEMITE! ...

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