Personal Property Management Handbook - National Park Service

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NATIONAL PARK SERVICE PERSONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK # 44

Release 6

January 2009

PERSONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK # 44 Table of Contents INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................... 8 SECTION 1: PERSONAL PROPERTY ADMINISTRATION ..............................................................10 1.0 -- SCOPE ..............................................................................................................................................10 1.1 -- DEFINITIONS......................................................................................................................................10 1.2 -- SUPPLEMENTAL REGULATIONS ............................................................................................................17 1.3 -- COMPLIANCE REVIEWS .......................................................................................................................17 1.4 -- PROPERTY MANAGEMENT FORMS ........................................................................................................18 1.5 -- ACCOUNTABILITY STRUCTURE AND RESPONSIBILITIES ............................................................................18 SECTION 2: PERSONAL PROPERTY ACCOUNTABILITY .............................................................25 2.0 -- ACCOUNTABLE PROPERTY ..................................................................................................................25 2.1 -- CAPITALIZATION AND ACCOUNTABILITY RECORDS .................................................................................26 2.2 -- ACCOUNTING FOR CAPITALIZED PROPERTY ..........................................................................................26 2.3 -- CAPITALIZATION THRESHOLD ..............................................................................................................27 2.4 -- GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNT ...............................................................................................................27 2.5 -- PROPERTY ACCOUNTABILITY RECORDS ................................................................................................28 2.6 -- PROPERTY RECORDS RETENTION AND DISPOSAL ...................................................................................30 2.7 -- ACCOUNTABLE PROPERTY OFFICER - RELIEF OF ACCOUNTABILITY .........................................................31 2.8 -- CUSTODIAL PROPERTY OFFICER - RELIEF OF ACCOUNTABILITY ..............................................................31 2.9 -- TRANSFER OF ACCOUNTABILITY ..........................................................................................................31 2.10 -- RESPONSIBILITY RECORDS ................................................................................................................31 2.11 -- PROPERTY CLEARANCE ....................................................................................................................32 2.12 -- PROPERTY PASS ..............................................................................................................................32 2.13 -- USE OF GOVERNMENT-OWNED PROPERTY IS RESTRICTED ....................................................................33 2.14 -- PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.........................................................................34 SECTION 3: PERSONAL PROPERTY INVENTORIES ......................................................................35 3.0 -- PROPERTY INVENTORIES RESPONSIBILITY .............................................................................................35 3.1 -- ANNUAL PHYSICAL INVENTORIES .........................................................................................................35 3.2 -- IDENTIFYING AND COUNTING ..............................................................................................................35 3.3 -- ADVISING THE ACCOUNTABLE PROPERTY OFFICER ................................................................................36 3.4 -- NOTIFICATION TO THE ACCOUNTABLE PROPERTY OFFICER ....................................................................36 3.5 -- ACCOUNTABLE PROPERTY OFFICER ACTION .........................................................................................37 3.6 -- ADDITIONS TO THE INVENTORY ...........................................................................................................37 3.7 -- SUBTRACTIONS FROM THE INVENTORY .................................................................................................37 3.8 -- SPECIAL INVENTORIES ........................................................................................................................38 3.9 -- ANNUAL INVENTORY RECONCILIATION .................................................................................................38 3.10 -- INVENTORY CERTIFICATION STATEMENTS ...........................................................................................38 3.11 -- INVENTORY REPORTS .......................................................................................................................39 3.12 -- INVENTORY DOCUMENT RETENTION ..................................................................................................40 3.13 -- REPLACEMENT BAR CODE LABELS .....................................................................................................40 3.14 -- LEASED PROPERTY INVENTORY .........................................................................................................40 3.15 -- CAPITAL VERSUS OPERATING LEASES .................................................................................................41

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SECTION 4: CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY.................................................................................42 4.0 -- RESPONSIBILITY .................................................................................................................................42 4.1 -- PERSONAL PROPERTY CLASSIFICATION.................................................................................................42 4.2 -- CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA ..................................................................................................................42 SECTION 5: RECEIPT OF PROPERTY AND SERVICES ..................................................................44 5.0 -- SCOPE ..............................................................................................................................................44 5.1 -- POLICY .............................................................................................................................................44 5.2 -- BASIC RECEIVING PRINCIPLES .............................................................................................................44 5.3 –DOCUMENTATION OF RECEIPTS..............................................................................................................45 SECTION 6: IDENTIFICATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY ...........................................................47 6.0 -- GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP IDENTIFICATION MARKINGS ..........................................................................47 6.1 -- EXEMPTION .......................................................................................................................................47 6.2 -- ASSIGNMENT & DISPLAY OF PROPERTY NUMBERS .................................................................................47 6.3 -- ITEMS REQUIRING SPECIAL IDENTIFICATION ..........................................................................................47 6.4 -- STANDARDIZED PROCEDURES FOR THE PLACEMENT OF BARCODE LABELS ON PERSONAL PROPERTY THROUGHOUT THE NPS ................................................................................................................................48 6.5 -- LABELING PROCEDURES FOR METAL AND PAPER PRESSURE-SENSITIVE ADHESIVE TYPE LABELS .................49 SECTION 7: STORES RECORDS MANAGEMENT ............................................................................51 7.0 -- GENERAL STORES MANAGEMENT .........................................................................................................51 7.1 -- GENERAL LEDGER CONTROL ACCOUNT ................................................................................................51 7.2 -- STOREHOUSE RECORDS ......................................................................................................................51 7.3 -- PERIODIC RECONCILIATION .................................................................................................................51 7.4 -- DESIGNATION OF EMPLOYEES AUTHORIZED TO WITHDRAW PROPERTY FROM A STOREHOUSE ....................51 7.5 -- DOCUMENTATION OF ISSUES ...............................................................................................................52 7.6 -- RECORDS AND CONTROL OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL..................................................................................52 7.7 -- ANNUAL REVIEW AND REPORT OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL .........................................................................52 7.8 -- CENTRAL SUPPLY ITEMS .....................................................................................................................53 7.9 -- PROGRAM OFFICE RESPONSIBILITIES ....................................................................................................64 7.10 -- CENTRAL SUPPLY OPERATION...........................................................................................................64 7.11 -- CENTRAL SUPPLY STOCK RECORD CARDS AND SEMI ANNUAL INVENTORIES ...........................................65 7.12 -- STORAGE OF CENTRAL SUPPLY ITEM(S) .............................................................................................66 7.13 -- CENTRAL SUPPLY ACTIVITY LOCATIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES ............................................................66 7.14 -- INSTRUCTIONS FOR REQUISITIONING CENTRAL SUPPLY ITEMS ..............................................................67 7.15 -- REQUISITIONING OFFICE RESPONSIBILITIES.........................................................................................67 SECTION 8: SURVEY PROCEDURES ..................................................................................................69 8.0 -- SCOPE ..............................................................................................................................................69 8.1 -- RELIEF FROM ACCOUNTABILITY ...........................................................................................................69 8.2 -- SURVEY ACTION IS NOT REQUIRED .......................................................................................................69 8.3 -– REFERRAL TO SURVEY AUTHORITY ......................................................................................................69 8.4 -- SURVEY ACTION REQUIRED .................................................................................................................70 8.5 -- TYPES OF SURVEY AUTHORITY ............................................................................................................70 8.6 -- STANDING BOARD OF SURVEY .............................................................................................................70 8.7 -- LOCAL SURVEY OFFICER.....................................................................................................................70 8.8 -- TRAVELING SURVEY OFFICER ..............................................................................................................70 8.9 -- SPECIAL BOARDS OF SURVEY ..............................................................................................................71 8.10 -- REPORT OF SURVEY FORMS ..............................................................................................................71 8.11 -- DISTRIBUTION .................................................................................................................................71

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8.12 -- ADDITIONAL DISTRIBUTION ...............................................................................................................71 8.13 -- NOTIFICATION OF A BOARD OF SURVEY/SURVEY OFFICER ...................................................................71 8.14 -– SURVEY SIGNATURE .........................................................................................................................71 8.15 -– BOARD OF SURVEY ACTIVITY LIMITATIONS .........................................................................................71 8.16 -– CONTINUING SURVEYED PROPERTY IN SERVICE...................................................................................72 8.17 -– WITNESSING DESTRUCTION OR REDUCTION TO SCRAP.........................................................................72 8.18 -– DESTRUCTION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS....................................................................72 8.19 -- REVIEWING AUTHORITY FOR REPORTS OF SURVEY ..............................................................................72 8.20 -- AUTHORITY TO OVERTURN FINDINGS AND DETERMINATIONS ................................................................72 8.21 -- REMOVAL OF SURVEYED PROPERTY FROM ACCOUNTABILITY RECORDS ..................................................72 8.22 -- PROPERTY IRREGULARITIES...............................................................................................................73 8.23 -- REPORTING THEFT, UNAUTHORIZED USE, OR VANDALISM TO LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITIES ............73 8.24 -- INVESTIGATION REQUIREMENT ..........................................................................................................73 8.25 -- BOARD OF SURVEY OR SURVEY OFFICER RESPONSIBILITIES ..................................................................73 8.26 -- EMPLOYEE LIABILITY, NOTIFICATION, AND APPEAL.............................................................................74 8.27 -- EMPLOYEE NOTIFICATION AND PARTICIPATION ...................................................................................75 8.28 -- FINANCIAL LIABILITY AND DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS ...............................................................................75 8.29 -- DETERMINING THE AMOUNT OF FINANCIAL LIABILITY ..........................................................................75 8.30 -- DEPRECIATION FORMULA FOR LOST, DAMAGED OR STOLEN PROPERTY .................................................76 8.31 -- EMPLOYEE NOTIFICATION OF FINDINGS AND DETERMINATIONS .............................................................77 8.32 -- EMPLOYEE APPEAL OF SURVEY FINDINGS AND DETERMINATIONS ..........................................................77 8.33 -- TRANSMITTAL OF THE OFFICIAL FILE .................................................................................................77 8.34 -- DEBT COLLECTION...........................................................................................................................78 8.35 -- BILLING THE EMPLOYEE ...................................................................................................................78 8.36 -- UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY ..............................................................................................................78 8.37 -- RELIEF FROM ACCOUNTABILITY FOR UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY ..........................................................78 8.38 -- CERTIFICATE OF UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY SIGNATURE .....................................................................78 8.39 -- CERTIFICATE OF UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY FORMS ...........................................................................78 8.40-- CONDUCTING AN UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY ACTION ..........................................................................79 8.41 -- DETERMINATION OF UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY .................................................................................79 8.42 -- CONTINUING UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY IN SERVICE ..........................................................................79 8.43 -- WITNESSING DESTRUCTION OR REDUCTION TO SCRAP.........................................................................79 8.44 -- DESTRUCTION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS....................................................................79 8.45 -- REVIEWING AUTHORITY FOR CERTIFICATES OF UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY ...........................................79 8.46 -- AUTHORITY TO OVERTURN FINDINGS DETERMINATIONS FOR UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY ........................79 8.47 -- REMOVAL OF UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY FROM ACCOUNTABILITY RECORDS ..........................................80 SECTION 9: MANAGEMENT OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION..................................................81 9.0 -- SCOPE ..............................................................................................................................................81 9.1 -- LAW ENFORCEMENT FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION .................................................................................81 9.2 -- MUSEUM COLLECTION FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION...............................................................................81 9.3 -- ACCOUNTABILITY AND CONTROL OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION ...........................................................82 9.4 -- CENTRALIZED RECEIVING POINT FOR FIREARMS ISSUED BY THE FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER (FLETC) ........................................................................................................................................84 9.5 -- ACQUISITION OF FIREARMS .................................................................................................................85 9.6 -- PURCHASE OF NEW AND/OR REPLACEMENT FIREARMS ..........................................................................85 9.7 -- MARKING AND IDENTIFICATION OF FIREARMS ........................................................................................85 9.8 -- SHIPMENT/INSPECTION OF FIREARMS ..................................................................................................85 9.9 -- INVENTORIES OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION .......................................................................................86 9.10 -- SPECIAL INVENTORIES OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION ........................................................................86 9.11 -- USE OF NON-GOVERNMENT-OWNED FIREARMS ...................................................................................86 9.12 -- EXCHANGE OF FIREARMS ISSUED BY FLETC .......................................................................................86

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9.13 -- ISSUANCE OF FIREARMS TO SEASONAL COMMISSIONED EMPLOYEES .......................................................86 9.14 -- ADVISING THE ACCOUNTABLE PROPERTY OFFICER OF TRANSFERS ........................................................87 9.15 -- SEPARATION OF LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL FROM THE SERVICE OR POSITION................................87 9.16 -- ISSUANCE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION..........................................................................................87 9.17 -- SECURITY AND STORAGE OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION ....................................................................87 9.18 -- UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF EXCESS FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION ....................................................88 9.19 -- DISPOSAL CONDITION CODES ............................................................................................................88 9.20 -- SCREENING OF AVAILABLE EXCESS FIREARMS......................................................................................88 9.21 -- DONATION OF FIREARMS TO OTHER LAW ENFORCEMENT ENTITIES .......................................................89 9.22 -- DISPOSAL/DESTRUCTION OF FIREARMS ..............................................................................................89 9.23 -- DISPOSAL OF AMMUNITION ...............................................................................................................90 9.24 -- SHIPPING AND PACKAGING INSTRUCTIONS FOR FIREARMS ....................................................................90 9.25 -- SALE OF FIREARMS/WEAPONS ..........................................................................................................91 9.26 -- REPORTING FIREARMS AS LOST OR STOLEN ........................................................................................91 9.27 -- ABANDONED, FORFEITED OR DESTROYED FIREARMS............................................................................91 SECTION 10: UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND PERSONAL PROPERTY ..........................................................................................................................92 10.0 -- SCOPE ............................................................................................................................................92 10.1 -- HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ...................................................................................................................92 10.2 -- IDENTIFICATION/INVENTORY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ....................................................................92 10.3 -- REPORTING REQUIREMENTS ..............................................................................................................92 10.4 -- TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ..............................................................................................92 10.5 -- DONATION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ..............................................................................................93 10.6 -- REPORTING HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FOR SALE ...................................................................................93 10.7 -- TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ...................................................................................93 10.8 -- SPECIAL TYPES OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS........................................................................................93 10.9 -- SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR UTILIZATION, DONATION, SALE, AND ABANDONMENT OR DESTRUCTION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS................................................................................................................................94 10.10 -- PERSONAL PROPERTY ....................................................................................................................95 10.11 -- PROPERTY UTILIZATION REVIEWS ...................................................................................................95 10.12 -- REASSIGNMENT OF PERSONAL PROPERTY .........................................................................................95 10.13 -- SCREENING NON-REPORTABLE AVAILABLE PROPERTY .......................................................................95 10.14 -- SCREENING REPORTABLE AVAILABLE PROPERTY ...............................................................................95 10.15 -- REPORTING REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................................................95 10.16 -- FORMS AND DISTRIBUTION OF REPORTS ...........................................................................................95 10.17 -- PROPERTY NOT REQUIRED TO BE FORMALLY REPORTED ...................................................................96 10.18 -- ITEMS REQUIRING SPECIAL HANDLING .............................................................................................96 10.19 -- TRANSFERS OF EXCESS PROPERTY ...................................................................................................96 10.20 -- REIMBURSEMENT............................................................................................................................96 10.21 -- PROCEDURES FOR EFFECTING TRANSFERS ........................................................................................96 10.22 -- COSTS OF CARE AND HANDLING......................................................................................................97 10.23 -- USE OF EXCESS PERSONAL PROPERTY ON COST-REIMBURSEMENT CONTRACTS ....................................97 10.24 -- GIFTS AND DECORATIONS RECEIVED FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS OR FOREIGN INDIVIDUALS .............97 10.25 -- GIFTS GIVEN TO FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS OR FOREIGN INDIVIDUALS ..................................................97 10.26 -- DONATION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY ...............................................................................................97 10.27 -- REVIEWING AUTHORITY .................................................................................................................98 10.28 -- REPORTS ......................................................................................................................................98 10.29 -- DIRECT DONATION OF EXCESS AND SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY ....................................................98 10.30 -- ABANDONMENT OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY.............................................................101 10.31 -- SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY......................................................................................................101 10.32 -- CONDUCT OF SALES .....................................................................................................................102

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10.33 -- ABANDONMENT OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY.............................................................103 10.34 -- LOST AND FOUND UNCLAIMED PROPERTY ......................................................................................103 10.35 -- RECOVERY OF PRECIOUS METALS ..................................................................................................104 10.36 -- EXCHANGE/SALE AUTHORITY .......................................................................................................104 10.37 -- TRANSFER AND EXCHANGE BETWEEN FEDERAL AGENCIES ................................................................105 10.38 -- RESTRICTIONS AND LIMITATIONS ...................................................................................................105 10.39 -- SPECIAL AUTHORIZATIONS............................................................................................................105 10.40 -- EXCHANGE AND SALE PROCEDURES ...............................................................................................105 SECTION 11: MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT ............................................................................106 11.0 -- PURPOSE ......................................................................................................................................106 11.1 -- SCOPE ..........................................................................................................................................106 11.2 -- AUTHORITY ...................................................................................................................................106 11.3 -- RESPONSIBILITIES...........................................................................................................................107 11.4 -- DEFINITIONS..................................................................................................................................107 11.5 -– ACQUIRING FUEL EFFICIENT MOTOR VEHICLES .................................................................................110 11.6 -– MOTOR VEHICLE ACQUISITIONS ......................................................................................................110 11.7 -- SOURCES OF SUPPLY FOR MOTOR VEHICLES .....................................................................................110 11.8 -- MANDATORY PROVISIONS AFFECTING THE ACQUISITION AND USE OF MOTOR VEHICLES .......................111 11.9 -- LEASING OF MOTOR VEHICLES ........................................................................................................112 11.10 -– MOTOR VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION AND EXEMPTIONS ........................................................................113 11.11 -– VEHICLE LICENSE PLATES .............................................................................................................113 11.12 -- LOST OR STOLEN LICENSE PLATES ................................................................................................114 11.13 -– ASSIGNMENT OF LICENSE PLATE NUMBERS .....................................................................................114 11.14 -– REQUISITIONS FOR LICENSE PLATES ..............................................................................................114 11.15 -- OFFICIAL USE OF GOVERNMENT MOTOR VEHICLES .........................................................................114 11.16 – TRANSPORTATION OF NON-OFFICIAL PASSENGERS ...........................................................................116 11.17 -– USE OF PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLES (POV) FOR OFFICIAL BUSINESS .............................................117 11.18 -– UNAUTHORIZED USE OF MOTOR VEHICLES .....................................................................................117 11.19 -– ADVERSE AND DISCIPLINARY ACTION .............................................................................................117 11.20 -– PERSONAL USE OF GOVERNMENT OWNED OR LEASED MOTOR VEHICLES/EQUIPMENT ........................118 11.21 -- VIOLATION OF STATE AND LOCAL MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC LAWS ..................................................118 11.22 -– MOTOR VEHICLE REPLACEMENT, ASSIGNMENT, UTILIZATION, TRANSFER, AND DISPOSAL ..................118 11.23 -– VEHICLE UTILIZATION STANDARDS ................................................................................................122 11.24 -– VEHICLE UTILIZATION STANDARD EXCEPTIONS ...............................................................................123 11.25 -- GSA VEHICLE ROTATION .............................................................................................................123 11.26 -- SIZE RESTRICTIONS ......................................................................................................................123 11.27 -- FUEL EFFICIENCY REQUIREMENTS..................................................................................................123 11.28 -– VEHICLE USAGE LIMITATIONS .......................................................................................................123 11.29 -- REIMBURSEMENT FOR SERVICES.....................................................................................................124 11.30 -- OPERATOR'S LICENSES AND IDENTIFICATION CARDS ........................................................................124 11.31 -– CARE, SAFETY AND SECURITY OF MOTOR VEHICLES........................................................................125 11.32 -- SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE ...........................................................................................................127 11.33 -- DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SELF-INSURER CARD ......................................................................127 11.34 -- REPORTING MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS .......................................................................................127 11.35 –- ACCIDENT REPORTING PROCEDURES .............................................................................................128 11.36 -- U. S. GOVERNMENT RESPONSIBILITY ............................................................................................129 11.37 -- GOVERNMENT RENTAL CAR COMPANY RESPONSIBILITY ...................................................................129 11.38 -– OPERATOR FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY ..........................................................................................130 11.39 -- OPERATOR'S PACKET FOR GSA LEASED VEHICLES ..........................................................................130 11.40 -– MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF COMMERCIALLY LEASED OR PURCHASED VEHICLES .............................131 11.41 -– SERVICE AND REPAIR OF RENTAL VEHICLES ....................................................................................132

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11.42 -– VEHICLE REPAIR LIMITATIONS .......................................................................................................132 11.43 -– VEHICLE INSPECTIONS ..................................................................................................................132 11.44 -- TRANSFER, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL OF MOTOR VEHICLES.............................................................132 11.45 -– PARKING AND STORAGE ...............................................................................................................133 11.46 -- PROCUREMENT OF PARKING ACCOMMODATIONS .............................................................................133 11.47 -- FLEET CHARGE CARDS .................................................................................................................133 11.48 -– MOTOR VEHICLE FUELING ............................................................................................................134 11.49 -– MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL USAGE ......................................................................................................134 11.50 -- MAINTENANCE OF MOTOR VEHICLE RECORDS .................................................................................134 11.51 -- MOTOR VEHICLE REPORTING DATA ...............................................................................................135 11.52 -- OFFICIAL USE OF GOVERNMENT PASSENGER CARRIERS BETWEEN RESIDENCE AND PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT.............................................................................................................................................135 11.53 -- AUTHORIZED USES OF GOVERNMENT MOTOR VEHICLES FOR HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION .......136 11.54 -- PROCEDURES FOR AUTHORIZING THE USE OF A GOVERNMENT MOTOR VEHICLE BETWEEN AN EMPLOYEE’S RESIDENCE AND PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT ...................................................................................138 11.55 -– HOME-TO-WORK REPORTING RESPONSIBILITIES.............................................................................143 11.56 -– REPORTING HOME-TO-WORK VEHICLE USAGE...............................................................................143 11.57 -– HOME-TO-WORK CONGRESSIONAL REPORTS .................................................................................144 11.58 -- CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS..........................................................................................................144 11.59 -– TERMINATION OF APPROVED AUTHORIZATIONS ..............................................................................144

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Release No. 6

January 2009

Introduction The function of personal property management is based upon the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), the laws passed and amended by Congress, called statutory law and their application issued as Federal, Department, and Agency regulations, called administrative law. Both statutory and administrative laws are legally binding. They establish the legal framework within which the conduct of personal property management must be accomplished. There are two principal laws passed by the United States Congress that establish the main body of statutory and regulatory requirements relevant to the management of Government personal property. (a) The First Act is the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 (Title 40 U.S.C.). One of the aspects of this act was the creation of the General Services Administration (GSA). One of the many responsibilities assigned GSA was to establish regulations guiding and governing civilian executive agencies of the Federal Government in all matters pertaining to property management, to include physical accounting and control of Government property. (b) The Second Act, Public Law 84-863, passed in 1956, requires that financial accounting as well as physical accounting be incorporated in property management. This is why every property transaction, whether for land, buildings, supplies, equipment, or services, must include financial information, and be accounted for. All Government property is accountable. By law, all financial accounting systems within the Federal Government are within the purview of the General Accounting Office (GAO). The GAO Policy and Procedural Manual for Guidance of Federal Agencies, Title 2, Accounting, Section 12.5 establishes Government-wide accounting principles and standards for all Government property, governing such items as capitalization of fixed assets, trade-in, purchase discounts, exchange/sale, handling and storage costs, physical inventories, and depreciation. In order to implement these laws as amended, Government-wide regulations are established by the Office of the President (Executive Orders and Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Directives), GSA and OMB. Federal Agencies and their sub-activities are required to further amplify these laws, regulations, Executive Orders, and manuals into operating procedures for accomplishing all property management requirements within their own area of responsibility. This will insure that specific required applications occur with the exact emphasis necessitated by the uniqueness of each agency. In addition to the two laws referenced above, the following statutory provisions establish property management requirements for the NPS: (1) Section 202 (b) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended (40 U.S.C. 483b) requires each executive agency to maintain formal accountability systems for property under its control. (2) Title 31 of the U.S. Code (31 U.S.C. 1344) Use of Government Transportation Property. (3) Title 31 of the U.S. Code (31 U.S.C. 3512) requires systems maintenance, internal

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controls, and adequate monetary property accounting records. 4) Title 18 of the U.S. Code (18 U.S. C. 641) provides “Whoever embezzles, steals, purloins, sells, conveys, disposes of records, money, or other items of value to the ‘United States’ or other federal entity, will be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both. But, if the value does not exceed $100 they will be fined not more than $1000 or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.” (5) Title 16 of the U.S. Code (16 U.S.C. 18f) facilitates the management and preservation of museum properties. Policies, regulations and procedures continuously undergo change. Causes of such change vary. Some occur as a result of new laws passed by the Congress as well as the repeal by Congress of existing law. Other changes occur because of direction or emphasis on the part of the Executive Branch. Still other changes occur due to the creation of new system and method capabilities, sometimes called "enhancing the state of the art." As a result, both Federal and Organizational regulations, directives and procedures require continuous amendment. This causes property management to be dynamic rather than static. This means that those persons involved in property management must be alert to change, must expect it, must keep abreast of it, and must be capable of adapting to it in order to successfully complete the responsibilities of property management. Individuals responsible for property management must be concerned with being advised of such changes as they occur. Toward that end, regulations and their changes are provided for the individuals who are responsible for the functions of property management on a continuing basis by the Federal Register, Code of Federal Regulations, The Federal Property Management Regulations System (FPMR), Federal Management Regulation System (FMR), Individual Agency Property Management Regulations/Handbooks, General Accounting Office Accounting Manual, The Comptroller General, GSA Handbooks, Guidelines and Manuals. Sometimes circulars, Personal Property Management Technical Instructions and Information Notices, memorandums, letters, or similar media will be used to distribute information. If the rules become permanent, they will be incorporated into this handbook upon the next revision. All pertinent property management regulations and other requirements must be maintained by personnel performing property management functions in the most current, as amended edition available, and utilized in concert with one another.

_________________________________ Property Management Program Manager

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Section 1: Personal Property Administration 1.0 -- Scope The policies and procedures prescribed in this handbook are a compilation of requirements imposed by higher-level authorities, including the Congress, General Services Administration (GSA), Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Department of the Interior (DOI). All NPS personnel will be responsible for adhering to these policies and procedures. NPS museum property requirements and procedures are prescribed in the NPS Museum Handbook. 1.1 -- Definitions Abandoned or Other Unclaimed Property: Personal property that is found on premises owned or leased by the NPS which may be retained for official use or processed for utilization and disposal. Accession: A transaction whereby one or more objects are acquired in the same manner, from one source, and at one time, for the museum collection. Types of accessions include gifts, exchanges, purchases, field collections, incoming loans, and transfers. An identifying number is assigned to each accession. Associated documentation is filed in an accession folder. Accountability Area: A geographic or organizational entity within the NPS. Accountable Property Officer: A Government employee assigned overall responsibility for a specified group of property items and ensuring the establishment and maintenance of accountability records to provide for effective control over that property. Accountable Property Officers within the NPS are usually the individuals in charge of a park, area, refuge, office, etc. Accountable Property Officers are designated in writing by the Property Administrator. Property Administrators are Regional Directors, Center Managers and the Assistant Director, Business Services, WASO. At the discretion of the Property Administrator, he or she may authorize in writing, the Accountable Property Officer to re-delegate his or her responsibilities to the Assistant/Deputy Superintendent, Chief of Administration and Administrative Officer or other responsible Management Official. Accountable Property: Non-expendable personal property with a useful life of two years or more for which accountability or property control records are maintained, and which may or may not be charged to a general ledger control account. Accountable property includes system-controlled, bureau managed, capitalized, non-capitalized, sensitive, leased, contractor-held, museum and stores property. Acquisition Cost: The total amount charged or paid to acquire assets including the handling, storage, packing, shipping, transportation, installation, and related costs of obtaining the assets in their current form and place, less prompt payment or other discounts. For items received as a result of donation or transfer (without reimbursement), a fair market value or actual value at the time of receipt will be established. That value, plus any other related costs included above, will represent the acquisition cost.

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Ammunition: Small arms ammunition or cartridge cases, primers, bullets, or smokeless propellants designed for use in small arms, including percussion caps, 3/32 inch and other external burning pyrotechnic hobby fuses. The term does not include black powder. Arrowhead Decals: Official insignia of the NPS. Arrowhead Patches: Official insignia of the NPS worn as part of the uniform. Betterments: An enhancement to a given piece of equipment that adds value or increases the capability of the item, or extends the useful life one or more years. Betterments meeting or exceeding the $15,000.00 capitalization threshold for personal property must be recorded as a separate item in the Property Accountability System and financial records. Board of Survey: The Board of Survey consists of three or more disinterested individuals and one chairperson appointed in writing by the Accountable Property Officer for one year to: (1) review and investigate all circumstances surrounding lost, stolen, damaged, or destruction of Government property; (2) make impartial decisions concerning the disposition of the property; and (3) arrive at findings and make determinations as to financial liability. Bureau Managed Property: Personal property with an original acquisition cost of $300.00 to $4,999.99, excluding sensitive and museum property. Bureau Managed Property is not recorded in the Property Accountability System, but requires accountability in the NPS Informal Inventory Database or on a typed list. Bureau/Office: This refers to all Departmental bureaus, as well as the Office of the Secretary, Office of Surface Mining, National Park Service, etc. Capitalized Property: Non-expendable property, (excluding stewardship property, plant, and equipment) with a useful life of two years or more, and an acquisition cost at, or above the $15,000.00 capitalization threshold. It does not include property acquired through loan or museum property. Property converted to ownership at the end of a lease period may be capitalized. Cognizant Employee: Any employee who utilizes Government property and is responsible for the proper and reasonable care, use, safeguarding, and return of such property. Contractor Inventory: Any property including Government-furnished property, acquired by or in the possession of a contractor or subcontractor under a contract, grant, cooperative agreement, concessions contract, or a memorandum of understanding, pursuant to the terms where title is vested in the Government. Contractor records of Government property established and maintained under the terms of an agreement are the Government’s official Government property records. However, Government property managers are required to maintain records of capitalized Government personal property provided to a contractor under the terms of a contract and to report such property to the general ledger financial accounts. Custodial Property Officer: An official who is responsible for daily control and supervision of personal property assigned to him or her. This designation may or may not correspond to the individual's job title. Disposable Pay: The remainder of an individual’s pay after the deduction of any amount

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required by law to be withheld. Disposal: Disposition of surplus personal property through donation, sale, abandonment or destruction. See the NPS Museum Handbook, for information on disposal of museum property. Donable Property: Surplus property under the control of an executive agency, including surplus personal property in working capital funds established in 10 U.S.C. 2208 or in similar management type funds except: (1) such property as may be specified from time to time by the Administrator of the General Services Administration and determined from time to time by the Secretary of Agriculture to be commodities requiring special handling to assist in carrying out his responsibilities with respect to price support or stabilization; (2) property in trust funds; or (3) non-appropriated fund property. This term does not apply to museum property. Donee: A service educational activity; a State, political subdivision, municipality, or tax supported institution acting on behalf of a public airport; a public agency using surplus personal property in carrying out or promoting for the residents of a given political area for one or more public purposes, such as conservation, economic development, education, parks and recreation, public health, and public safety; an eligible nonprofit tax exempt educational or public health institution or organization; the American National Red Cross; a public body; or any state or local government agency; and any nonprofit organization or institution, which receives appropriated program funds for older individuals under the Older Americans Act of 1965, as amended under Title IV or Title XX of the Social Security Act, or under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 and the Community Services Block Grant Act. The authority for the donation of computer equipment is the Stevenson-Wydler Act. This term does not apply to museum property. Excess Personal Property: Any personal property under the control of any Federal agency which is not required for its needs and the discharge of its responsibilities, as determined by the head thereof, or designee. Expendable Property: Non-sensitive property with a normal life expectancy of less than two years and an acquisition cost of less than $300.00. It is usually consumed in the normal course of its use, or becomes an integral part of another item. Explosives: Any chemical compound, mixture, or device, the primary or common purpose of which is to function by explosion. The term includes, but is not limited to, dynamite and other high explosives, black powder, pellet powder, initiating explosives, detonators, safety fuses, squibs, detonating cord, igniter cord, and igniters. Fair Market Value: The estimated price that both a buyer and seller would willingly agree to when neither party is under undue pressure to complete the transaction. Firearms: Any weapon (including flares, starter and taser guns) which will, or is designed to, or may readily be converted to, expel a projectile by the action of an explosive; the frame or receiver of any such weapon or any firearm muffler or firearm silencer; or any destructive device. This term does not include antique or museum collection firearms. Firearms Custodial Officer: A supervisory Commissioned Officer; (i.e., Chief Ranger or Supervisory Ranger, Criminal Investigator or Special Agent) responsible for assigning and controlling all firearms and ammunition.

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Fleet Manager: A designated official, who is responsible for administering the motor vehicle/heavy equipment program. Gift: A tangible or intangible present or donation (other than a decoration) tendered by or received from individuals, institutions or a foreign government. Government Furnished Property: Government property that a contracting officer authorizes a contractor to use for performance of a Government contract, grant, agreement, memorandum of agreement, etc. Hazardous Materials: Solid, liquid, or gaseous waste, or combination of these wastes, which because of its quantity, concentration or physical, chemical, or infectious characteristics may cause or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality and/or increase in serious irreversible or incapacitating illness or pose a substantial present or potential hazard to human health or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of, or otherwise managed. Head of Agency: The Secretary of the Interior is the head of the Department of the Interior. Heavy Equipment (also known as motorized equipment): Any item of equipment which is self-propelled or drawn by mechanical power, and is designed principally to be operated off highways. This includes construction and maintenance equipment, materials handling equipment, forestry and agricultural equipment, vessels, aircraft, and aircraft ground support equipment. Holding Agency: A Federal Agency having accountability for Government property. This term applies when a Federal agency has authority to take possession of, assign, or reassign property regardless of which agency is using the property. Local Survey Officer: An individual appointed by the Accountable Property Officer to survey property which has been rendered unserviceable due to fair wear and tear. Written authority cannot be extended to other circumstances. Materials and Supplies: Consumable items necessary for the construction, maintenance, operation, and support of governmental activities without distinction regarding its use for administrative or operational purposes. Museum Property: An assemblage of museum objects, collected according to some rational scheme and maintained so they can be preserved, studied, or interpreted for public benefit. Museum objects include prehistoric and historic objects, artifacts, works of art, non-record archival documents (see DM 1.11 and1.12), and natural history specimens that are a part of museum collections. Elements, fragments and components of structures are objects if they are no longer a part of the original structure. Museum property does not include those items necessary to display a collection such as exhibit cases, dioramas, special lighting, graphics, replicas, etc. (see 411 DM). Neglect or Negligence: Includes both simple and gross negligence. Simple negligence is the failure to exercise that degree of care which a prudent person would exercise under like circumstances. Gross negligence is an act or omission which constitutes misconduct in accordance with 370 DM 752, or a wanton and reckless disregard for the property.

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Non-Capitalized Property: Personal property with an acquisition cost below the $15,000.00 capitalization threshold. Non-Expendable Property: Property which has a continuing use; is not consumed in use; is of a durable nature with an expected service life of two or more years; and has an acquisition cost of $300.00 or more, or is identified as sensitive property. Non-Reportable Personal Property: Any personal property that has been determined to be in excess to the needs of the Department and is not required to be reported to the GSA except for sale purposes. Personal Property: Property of any kind or of any interest therein, except (1) real property, (2) records of the Federal Government, and (3) naval vessels of the following categories: battleships, cruisers, aircraft carriers, destroyers, and submarines. Specifically, personal property includes all equipment; materials and supplies; and museum objects. It does not include property that is incorporated in, or permanently affixed to real property. Personal Property Management: All functions necessary for the proper determination of need, source, acquisition, receipt, accountability, utilization, maintenance, rehabilitation, storage, distribution, and disposal of personal property. Physical Inventory: The act or process of physically inspecting and counting property items. Property Accountability: The assigned responsibility and liability associated with the management of Government property. It includes the responsibility for establishing and maintaining property records, safeguarding property and ensuring its proper use, as well as submitting required reports. It also includes the liability associated with loss, theft, damage, or destruction of Government property. Property Administrator: Regional Directors, Center Managers and the Assistant Director, Business Services, WASO are designated by the Director of the National Park Service as Property Administrators. They are responsible for ensuring accountability and control of personal property and the administration of the property program for the geographic areas under their jurisdiction. The Property Administration is responsible for dissemination and implementation of policy and guidance to subordinate or serviced offices. Property Irregularities: Property irregularities are defined as repetitive losses of a particular type of property or recurring losses at a given location, losses of a suspicious nature, evidence of serious misconduct or irregularity (fraud, falsification of records, etc.,) known, suspected, or alleged fraud, waste or abuse, or misappropriation of Government property, and loss or theft of a firearm or weapon, ammunition, explosives, hazardous materials, or a controlled substance. Property Liaison Officer: An individual designated in writing by the Custodial Property Officer to account for and control personal property under his or her assigned area. Property Loss: The damage to, or loss, theft, or destruction of Government property. Park Property Manager: The Park Property Manager is designated by the Accountable Property Officer. He or she serves as the primary coordinator for property management

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related matters, General Services Administration (GSA) and Departmental reporting requirements. Property Management Officer: The individual responsible for the overall administration, coordination and control of the NPS Personal Property Program. There is only one Property Management Officer per bureau. The Property Management Program Manager is designated by the Director of the National Park Service in Director’s Order No. 44, “Personal Property Management” as the Property Management Officer for the Service. This individual is responsible for policy direction and program oversight for the Property Management Program as prescribed by the Federal Property and Administrative Act of 1949, as amended 40 U.S.C. 471 (a)-(c), 481, 483-489, 491, 41 CFR 101, and the Departmental Interior Property Management Directives (IPMD). Property Responsibility: The obligation of an individual for the proper use, care, and safekeeping of property entrusted to their possession or direct supervision. Receiving Officer: An individual who receives property, goods, or services at a central location. This designation does not have to be in writing. Reconciliation: To settle or resolve differences between or among records, ledgers, and/or actual inventories. Regional/Center Property Manager: Regional/Center Property Managers are designated by the Accountable Property Officers. He or she serves as the primary coordinator for property management related matters, General Services Administration (GSA) or Departmental reporting requirements and information dissemination for his or her region. The Regional/Center Property Manager effectively coordinates and implements policy to ensure an efficient and effective Property Management Program within their area/offices. Related Personal Property: Any personal property which is an integral part of real property or is related to, designed for, or specially adapted to the functional or productive capacity of the real property and the removal of which property would significantly diminish the economic value of the real property. Normally, common use items, including but not limited to general purpose furniture, utensils, office machines, office supplies, or general purpose vehicles, are not considered to be related personal property; or which is determined by the Administrator, General Services Administration to be related to real property (see FPMR 101-47.103-13). Reportable Personal Property: Any personal property that has been determined to be in excess of the needs of the Department and is required to be reported to the General Services Administration in accordance with FPMR 101-43. Reviewing Authority: A management official designated by the head of a region, park, unit or the Property Management Officer to provide technical and procedural guidance to Boards of Survey/Survey Officers. The Reviewing Authority shall be the senior official, or designee at the next higher organizational level than where the property was assigned. The Reviewing Authority cannot be a member of the Board of Survey that acted in the case under consideration and under no circumstances shall the Reviewing Authority be the Accountable Property Officer for the property involved. Reviews may occur at the same level where the property and board members are assigned, if the Superintendent’s responsibilities as Accountable Property Officer have been re-delegated to the Assistant/Deputy Superintendent,

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Administrative Officer, or other designated Management Official. Salvage: Personal property having value greater than its basic material content but which is in such condition that it has no reasonable prospect of use for any purpose as a unit (either by the holding or other Federal agency), and its repair or rehabilitation for use as a unit is clearly impracticable. Repairs or rehabilitation estimated to cost in excess of 65 percent of acquisition cost would be considered "clearly impracticable" for purposes of this definition. Scrap: Personal property that has no value except for its basic material content. Screening Period: (a) For reportable excess personal property as defined in CFR 101-43.304, the calendar days from the day following receipt of a report in the appropriate GSA office to and including the day specified as the surplus release date. (b) For non-reportable excess personal property as defined in CFR 101-43.305, the calendar days from the day following the date of the determination by the holding agency that the property is available for screening as excess, to and including the day specified as the surplus release date. Sensitive Property: Property which is system-controlled, regardless of value, by detailed property accountability records. According to Departmental policy, sensitive property must, at a minimum, include firearms and museum property. NPS has developed additional categories of property determined to be sensitive and for which detailed property accountability records will be maintained. These items include firearms (including taser guns), monitors, laptop and personal computers (handheld computers are optional), printers, motor vehicles, motorcycles, motor scooters, boats, cameras (not to include disposable cameras), camcorders, projectors (TBD), MP3 Players/IPODs. The term “controlled” is used rather than sensitive. Museum property is also considered to be sensitive. However, it is not tracked in the Property Accountability System. Shelf Stock: Small quantities of expendable property located near end-users for their convenience and for immediate use. Quantities of each line item of shelf stock are large enough to meet immediate operating needs but small enough to informally control for the prevention of waste or misuse. Stores Property: Expendable or non-expendable property acquired for future use, usually in substantial quantity, charged to a general ledger stores account, and controlled in an inventory system. Surplus Personal Property: Any excess personal property not required for the needs and the discharge of the responsibilities of all Federal agencies, as determined by the Administrator of the General Services Administration, or designee. Museum property that is no longer needed is deaccessioned and subject to procedures outlined in the NPS Museum Handbook. Surplus Release Date: The predetermined date on which Federal utilization screening of excess personal property is terminated. The date signifies the transition of the property from excess to surplus status. This term is equivalent to "Automatic Release Date" or "ARD.” Survey Action: Official action taken by a Board of Survey or a Survey Officer involving the investigation into the loss, theft, damage, or destruction of Government property; or the determination of unserviceability of Government property.

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System-Controlled Property: Property with an original acquisition cost of $5,000.00 or more and sensitive property, regardless of cost. System-controlled property must be recorded and controlled in the Property Accountability System. Traveling Survey Officer: An individual appointed by the Property Management Officer, Property Administrator, or Accountable Property Officer in instances where the Accountable Property Officer is responsible for property at separate geographic locations. Utilization: The identification, processing, reporting, and transfer of excess personal property among Federal Agencies. Voluntarily Abandoned Property: Property abandoned in such a manner as to vest title in the Federal Government. Such property is subject to the provisions of Federal Management Regulation (FMR) Part 102-41. It may be retained by the seizing agency for official use or reported for utilization and disposal to GSA. 1.2 -- Supplemental Regulations Park Superintendents and other management officials shall ensure that the following regulations, director’s orders, handbooks, directives and amendments are made available to personnel performing property management functions: (1) 41 CFR, Chapter 101, FPMR. (2) Federal Management Regulations, Chapter 102. (3) Interior Property Management Directives. (4) 411 DM 1-3 Museum Property Management. (5) DO-6, Interpretation and Visitor Service. (6) DO-9, Law Enforcement. (7) DO-18, Fire Management. (8) DO-19, Records Management. (9) DO-28, Cultural Resources Management. (10) DO-32, NPS Cooperating Association. (11) DO-36, Government Furnished Housing Management. (12) DO-43, Service-wide Uniform Program. (13) DO-44, Personal Property Management. (14) Personal Property Management Handbook No. 44. (15) DO-50, Loss Control Management. (16) NPS-54, Internal Control System. (17) The NPS Museum Handbook. Regional/Center Property Managers may issue supplemental instructions or procedures as deemed necessary, but they must be consistent with the provisions of this handbook. 1.3 -- Compliance Reviews On-site regularly scheduled Property Management Reviews shall be conducted of regions/centers, support offices and parks/units at least every four years. Regional Directors/Center Managers are responsible for ensuring that reviews are conducted of the park/units that fall under their area of responsibility and shall be in accordance with the Departmental Review Guideline issued by the Office of Acquisition and Property Management.

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The Departmental Review Guideline is located in the NPS Property Management website located at www.nps.gov/propertymanagement. Upon request, a copy of the results shall be furnished to the Property Management Officer, WASO. The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO shall also periodically conduct reviews of the regional/center offices and parks/units. If there are budget or staffing limitations, reviews may be conducted via the electronic surveys located in the above referenced website. A list of the parks to be reviewed by the regions shall be provided to the Property Management Officer no later than December 31st of each year. 1.4 -- Property Management Forms Departmental forms are provided for use in carrying out the provisions of this handbook and IPMD 410 DM 114-60. Minor modifications to departmental forms may be made as long as the required data is retained. Property Management forms are located in the NPS Property Management website. Museum property forms are referenced in the NPS Museum Handbook. 1.5 -- Accountability Structure and Responsibilities Purpose: The purpose of the accountability structure is to establish continuity and align the proper structure at each region/center, and/or park/unit to facilitate control and accountability of personal property, in accordance with IPMD 410 DM 114-60. Individuals serving in the positions listed in the accountability structure shall be designated in writing by the appropriate person. All designations must be kept current. The accountability structure shall consist of one Property Management Officer at the Washington Office level, one Property Administrator at each region/center office and WASO to be held accountable for his or her Property Management Program, one Property Manager for each region/center and park/unit to manage the program, one each Accountable Property Officer and Receiving Officer at each location to manage the property, unless conditions demand otherwise, (multiple Accountable Property Officers may be considered only at parks/units where distance, geography, or dangerous travel conditions are a factor), and as many Custodial and Property Liaison Officers as deemed necessary to control and account for personal property. The Property Management Officer and the Property Administrators are designated in Director’s Order No. 44. In addition to the accountability structure referenced above, each region/center shall designate as many Fleet Managers and Firearm Custodians throughout their respective areas as deemed necessary to manage NPS motor vehicle fleets and to ensure proper control and accountability for firearms. The accountability structure shall be updated in the Property Accountability System to reflect current personnel designated as Property Administrators, Accountable Property, Custodial, and Property Liaison Officers when applicable. Property Administrators are responsible for designating Accountable Property Officers. Accountable Property Officers are responsible for designating the Custodial Officers, Firearms Custodial Officers, and Fleet Managers. The duties and responsibilities for those positions referenced above and the Cognizant Employee (Property Liaison Officer) and Motor Vehicle Operators are listed below. 1.5(a) -- Property Manager:

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The Property Manager is responsible for: (1) The day-to-day operations of the regional/center Property Management Program. (2) Providing overall administration, coordination, and control of the Personal Property Management Program. (3) Implementing policy, procedures, and systems applicable to the Personal Property Management Program. (4) Providing technical assistance regarding the Personal Property Management Program to parks/units under their jurisdiction. (5) Issuing instructions required for implementation of NPS policy and procedures. (6) Ensuring that established procedures for the acquisition, receipt, issuance, identification, accountability, control, and disposition of personal property are followed. (7) Ensuring that all documentation and records for personal property are completed within the established time frame required for each process involved, are accurate, and fully support each action. 1.5(b) -- Accountable Property Officers: Superintendents are designated by Property Administrators as Accountable Property Officers. At the discretion of the Property Administrator, he or she may authorize in writing, the Superintendent to re-delegate this authority to the most effective lowest level, i.e., Assistant/Deputy Superintendents, Administrative Officers, and Chiefs of Administration or other designated responsible Management Officials. The Accountable Property Officer for the WASO is the Washington Office Administrative Program Center Manager. There must be only one Accountable Property Officer per location unless the geographic jurisdiction is of such size as to preclude regular review and inspection of the property by one Accountable Property Officer. Multiple Accountable Property Officers should not be appointed solely to spread liability. Accountable Property Officers are responsible for: (1) The accountability and control of personal property within their area. (2) Designating in writing Custodial Property Officers, Firearms Custodial Officers, and area Fleet Managers to assist in the daily control of Government property. Assignment of Custodial Property Officers is necessary when the accountable area is so large and requires additional controls. (3) Ensuring compliance with the requirements of the Property Accountability System established by the Property Management Officer and implemented by the Property Administrator. (4) Maintenance of all property accountability records in their areas of accountability, and

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providing all required documentation to support entries, changes, and deletions in the Property Accountability System. (5) Conducting inspections to ensure property is being used effectively and is safeguarded properly, and ensuring the proper and effective maintenance of property within the property accountability area. (6) Implementing procedures for the repair and rehabilitation of property within the accountability area. (7) Coordinating the utilization and disposal of excess personal property, including providing Custodial Property Officers with disposition instructions. (8) Providing for the conduct of required physical inventories; reconciliation of any discrepancies arising from those inventories; and certifying in writing to the Property Administrator the results of the physical inventory and related reconciliation of property records and general ledger accounts prior to September 30th of each fiscal year. (9) Providing guidance to Custodial Property Officers in conducting physical inventories. (10) Ensuring that Custodial Property Officers conduct an inventory of personal property prior to their transfer or separation from the NPS. (11) Designating Board of Survey members to investigate Reports of Survey submitted for lost, stolen, damaged, or destroyed property. 1.5(c) -- Custodial Property Officers: Custodial Property Officers are responsible for: (1) Designating in writing when applicable, Property Liaison Officers. (2) Property in an area limited to that which can be reasonably overseen in the daily use of Government property, and in which the misuse, use other than for official purposes, movement, and unauthorized or authorized use is readily identifiable. (3) Informing the Accountable Property Officer of any activity affecting property within their jurisdiction that affects the status, disposition, or condition of that property. (4) Assigned property until notified in writing, by the Accountable Property Officer for the affected property that the responsibility for the property has been transferred to another custodial or accountable area, or disposal procedures have been completed in accordance with existing regulations, and the property item has been removed from the property records. (5) Preparing and providing all required documentation to the Accountable Property Officer, on all actions affecting the property, including, but not limited to, acquisitions, transfers, and disposals to support entries in the Property Accountability System. (6) Reporting all instances to the Accountable Property Officer when a loss or theft of

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property is detected or suspected. (7) Ensuring that property under their direct control is used for official purposes only. (8) Ensuring the proper use, maintenance, and protection of personal property issued to or located within the custodial area. (9) Screening personal property to identify and report excess property to the Accountable Property Officer. (10) Ensuring the accomplishment of inventory requirements as directed by the Accountable Property Officer. (11) Processing personnel clearances for Property Liaison Officers to ensure that all property is properly accounted for prior to separation or transfer. 1.5(d) -- Property Liaison Officers: Property Liaison Officers are responsible for: (1) Ensuring that all property is safeguarded against loss or theft at all times. (2) Reporting to the Custodial Property Officer, all instances when loss, damage, or destruction of property is detected or suspected, and providing all circumstances surrounding the loss, damage, or destruction. (3) Conducting an inventory prior to transfer or separation. (4) Conducting physical inventories of property as prescribed by the Custodial Property Officer. 1.5(e) -- Receiving Officers: Receiving Officers are responsible for: (1) The receipt and inspection of all personal property received at a specific location. However, if a Contracting Officer has appointed an inspector, the Receiving Officer may be relieved of the inspection responsibilities. (2) The proper care and safeguarding of all property received. (3) Providing the required documentation indicating the receipt of property to the appropriate financial office to ensure the processing of payment. (4) Providing required documentation, as directed by the Accountable Property Officer, to the appropriate property office, in order that the item received can be appropriately identified, marked and immediately be placed on the property accountability records of the Accountable Property Officer.

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1.5(f) -- Cognizant Employees: Cognizant Employees are responsible for: (1) The proper and reasonable care, use, safeguarding, and return of property. (2) Using property safely, efficiently, and only for official purposes. 1.5(g) – Service-wide Senior Fleet Manager: The NPS Property Management Program Manager is designated by the Director of the National Park Service (NPS) as the Service-wide Senior Fleet Manager. The Service-wide Senior Fleet Manager is the management official with the day-to-day responsibility for oversight and administration of the overall property management program, which includes fleet management. He or she is responsible for: (1) Establishing and implementing fleet management policies and procedures, accountability, management and control of all NPS owned, GSA and commercially leased vehicles and implementing fleet management strategy to improve critical mission support while achieving fleet management goals; (2) Developing and implementing a fleet management strategic plan to improve critical mission support and achieve goals of reducing total vehicle expenditures within the NPS; collaborative use of vehicles within the NPS and across parks/offices to improve utilization and increase efficiency; and “right-sizing” the fleet by acquiring the minimum number and size vehicles needed to accomplish the specific mission;

(3) Coordinating with regional/center fleet managers to ensure that fleet information is disseminated throughout the Service and that all fleet management reporting requirements are met; (4) Advising regions/centers and parks/units on issues or policy changes that could impact their program;

(5) Conducting annual on-site reviews of regional/center and park/unit fleet management programs to ensure compliance with pertinent policies and procedures and that vehicles are properly justified and not being underutilized; and (6) Managing the Fleet Charge Card Program and providing guidance/advice to regions/centers and parks/units and performing maintenance of fleet accounts in the credit card system; and

(7) Ensuring that record retention is in accordance with the Department of the Interior Charge Card Guide. 1.5(h) – Regional/Center Fleet Manager:

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Each Regional Director or Center Manager shall designate a regional/center fleet manager. The regional/center fleet manager is responsible for: (1) Providing program oversight for his or her region/center Fleet Management Program; (2) Establishing and coordinating an equipment share program and rotating vehicles where practical and economical to equalize usage; (3) Ensuring utilization goals are met within the vehicle life-cycle expectancy and for the most efficient operation; (4) Coordinating a regional/center equipment replacement/life-cycle review and priority setting and assisting parks in developing replacement specifications and ordering appropriate vehicles, based upon mission requirements; (5) Advising parks on issues or policy changes that could impact their fleet program; (6) Reviewing and ensuring that the parks fleet data is input into the software system and regularly updated; (7) Ensuring that all employees and volunteers are informed of their responsibility and accountability to operate motor vehicles in a safe and prudent manner and reporting motor vehicles that are in unsafe operating condition; (8) Reporting daily use, vehicle maintenance and complying with applicable motor vehicle regulations of federal, state, and local governments; (9) Coordinating with parks/unit fleet managers to ensure that fleet information is disseminated to the appropriate personnel and that all fleet management reporting requirements are met; (10) Ensuring that parks/units implement the established fleet management strategic plan to improve critical mission support and achieve goals of reducing total vehicle expenditures within the NPS; collaborate use of vehicles within parks/units to improve utilization and increase efficiency; and that parks right-size their fleet by acquiring the minimum number and size needed to accomplish the specific mission; (11) Conducting annual on-site reviews of park/unit fleet management programs to ensure compliance with pertinent policies and procedures and that vehicles are properly justified and not being underutilized; and (12) Reviewing fleet charge card statements, distributing fleet charge cards, performing maintenance of fleet accounts in credit card system, and reconciling the statement of account; and (13) Record retention of fleet management information in accordance with the Department of the Interior Charge Card Guide. 1.5(i) – Park/Unit Fleet Manager:

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Each Accountable Property Officer shall designate a park/unit fleet manager in writing for his or her park/unit. In some parks the fleet manager may be the individual with property management or facility management responsibilities. Park/unit fleet managers are responsible for: (1) Establishing local procedures for assignment and the most economical use of staff resources, equipment and vehicles in conformance with the established fleet management policies and procedures; (2) Ensuring that operational fleet management procedures are flexible enough to meet changing requirements; (3) Ensuring that all employees and volunteers are adequately trained and informed of their fleet management responsibilities; (4) Complying with applicable motor vehicle regulations of federal, state, and local governments; (5) Coordinating the review of fleet charge card statements, distributing fleet charge cards, performing maintenance of fleet accounts in the credit card system, and reconciling the statement of account; (6) Ensuring record retention in accordance with the Department of the Interior Charge Card Guide; (7) Reviewing equipment share programs and rotating vehicles where practical and economical to equalize usage and ensure utilization goals are met within the vehicle life-cycle expectancy, and for the most efficient operation; (8) Reviewing equipment replacement/life-cycle priorities and providing avenues of assistance in developing replacement specifications and ordering appropriate vehicles where necessary; and (9) Implementing the established fleet management strategic plan to improve critical mission support and achieve goals of reducing total vehicle expenditures within the NPS; collaborating use of vehicles within parks/units to improve utilization and increase efficiency; and rightsizing the fleet by acquiring the minimum number and size needed to accomplish the park/unit specific mission. 1.5(j) -- Motor Vehicle Operators: Motor Vehicle Operators are responsible for: (1) Operating motor vehicles in a safe and prudent manner. (2) Reporting motor vehicles that are in unsafe operating conditions. (3) Reporting daily use and maintenance according to instructions. (4) Complying with applicable motor vehicle regulations of Federal, state, and local governments.

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Section 2: Personal Property Accountability 2.0 -- Accountable Property (a) All system-controlled property must be controlled in the official Property Accountability System. The acquisition cost of system-controlled property (including any installation, shipping, and set-up charges) shall be recorded in the system. For items transferred, donated, or found during inventory, etc., the fair market value at the time of receipt will be used to determine the acquisition cost. All systemcontrolled property must be assigned to an Accountable Property Officer immediately upon receipt regardless of the source of acquiring the property. (b) Museum property is personal property and must be controlled through accessioning and cataloging procedures found in 411 DM. Museum collections are recorded in a Property Accountability System coordinated by the Museum Management Program, National Center for Cultural Resources, Stewardship and Partnership programs and are generally not subject to depreciation and they are not recorded in a general ledger account. (c) Single pieces of furniture with an original acquisition cost less than the $15,000.00 capitalization threshold shall be considered non-capitalized and nonexpendable property. (d) All personal property item(s) that meet the criteria for bureau managed property must be managed in the NPS Informal Inventory Database located in the NPS Property Management website at www.nps.gov/propertymanagement or on a typed list. The typed list must include the following information: nomenclature, manufacturer, model number, serial number, quantity, unit of issue, unit cost, the name of the individual last issued to, and its present location. Bureau managed property is controlled at the Custodial Property Officer level in order to minimize the administrative burden on the system and Property Managers. (e) The NPS sensitive property items list is as follows and these items must be maintained in the Property Accountability System regardless of the costs: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

firearms (to include taser guns) monitors laptop and personal computers (handheld computers are optional) printers motor vehicles motor scooters boats cameras (not to include disposable cameras), camcorders, and projectors (TBD) MP3 Players/IPODs

Managers at all levels will be held accountable for all property under their control. They must ensure that all employees are aware of their responsibilities and held accountable for proper

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use and care of Government-owned or leased property in their possession, and that all Government property is used for official purposes only. Managers and supervisors are responsible for and shall be held accountable for establishing controls over the acquisition, storage, issue, use, and return of sensitive property items. If there are other property items that are characterized as sensitive in nature, but are not listed above, a list of those items shall be maintained for property that requires special controls before and after issue. (f) Formal accountability in the Property Accountability System is required for all software costing $5,000 or more. The capitalization threshold for software is currently set at $100,000.00. (g) All expendable property meeting the criteria listed below, with the exception of day to day administrative operating supplies (e.g., printer cartridges and copy paper) must be controlled: (1) Expendable property acquired in bulk quantity for future issue with an aggregate acquisition cost of $1500 or more per line item, or (2) Expendable property line item having a total issue value for three months of $3000 or more. (3) Quantitative records must be maintained which includes the record unit and total line item cost. Running balances for each line item must be computed and recorded each time a receipt, issue, or disposal action occurs. Systems to maintain these controls must be approved by the Property Management Program Manager. (4) Exemptions to the dollar limitations may be granted by the Accountable Property Officer. Exemptions may only be made for offices having a very limited number of items meeting the controlled expendable property requirements, provided such items are not of a desirable nature for theft or personal conversion. A justification and approval shall be prepared which documents the rationale for not formally controlling the item(s). (5) Expendable property not meeting the dollar limitation criteria may be considered as shelf stock and need not be formally controlled. 2.1 -- Capitalization and Accountability Records NPS property records shall be maintained and financial accounting data recorded relative to the item's acquisition, physical quantities of property on hand and property locations. The accuracy of these records shall enable periodic independent verifications of the accounting records through reviews by the General Accounting Office, Office of Inspector General, Office of Acquisition and Property Management and physical inventories. Museum property is not capitalized. 2.2 -- Accounting for Capitalized Property The NPS Property Accountability System must comply with the system requirements of the

26

Joint Financial Management Improvement Program (JFMIP-SR-00-4) including the recording of financial accounting data relative to the item’s acquisition, physical quantities of property onhand, and property location. The records must also enable periodic independent verifications of accuracy of the accounting records through reviews, such as GAO and OIG audits, property management reviews and physical inventories. The NPS must establish and maintain a system of accounting for capitalized property in accordance with the requirements of IPMD 114-60. All non-expendable property items acquired and held by an office with an acquisition cost at or above $15,000 will be considered capitalized property. All capitalized personal property shall be depreciated based on the useful life of the item and salvage value, and begins upon receipt of the item. Transfers within Interior will maintain the same depreciation rate and useful life. Transfers from outside Interior and donations will be depreciated at the fair market value and the estimated remaining useful life at the time of receipt. Straight-line depreciation is the Departmental standard for depreciation. 2.3 -- Capitalization Threshold The NPS capitalization threshold has been approved by the Department at $15,000. This $15,000 level establishes the point at which capitalization begins. All personal property with an original acquisition cost of $15,000 or more must be capitalized in the property and finance system, unless (a) the item has a useful life of less than two years, or (b) the item is intended for sale. Betterments meeting, or exceeding, the capitalization threshold for personal property must be recorded as a separate item in the property and financial records. Specific exceptions for capitalization thresholds above $15,000 may be granted by the Office of Financial Management through the Office of Acquisition and Property Management with appropriate justification. Requests should be addressed to the Director, PAM through the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO and shall include any information or supporting evidence which verifies that acceptable accountability records are being and will be maintained for all accountable property at, above and below the proposed capitalization threshold. Requests will be considered only for a bureau/office in its entirety, and will not be considered for a portion thereof. The capitalization threshold for internal use software is $100,000 per license. All software with an acquisition cost of $100,000 or more must be tracked and recorded in the personal property and financial system (See Financial Statement Guidance Memo No. 2001-001). 2.4 -- General Ledger Account The Federal Financial System (FFS) has been established to maintain the NPS general ledger account for all capitalized, NPS-owned and leased personal property and property held by nonGovernment entities. Property acquired through loan shall not be entered into the general ledger account. Property converted to ownership at the end of a lease period may be capitalized. The original acquisition cost of capitalized property acquired and disposed of shall be reflected in the general ledger account. Such adjustments to the general ledger account must be made in the month the item is received or disposed. The cost of capitalized equipment must be

27

charged to the appropriate equipment account from the receiving report document. If the assigned object class, or type of funds cited on the purchase order/receiving report is incorrect because of the determination of capitalization, the Accountable Office or the Receiving Officer shall notify the appropriate finance office of the required change. The general ledger account, together with the property accountability records, must provide a record of the acquisition and disposition of all capitalized property, as well as provide information needed for inventory control and management purposes. Summary totals in the general ledger accounts shall be supported by detailed entries in the property accountability records. The Subsidiary General Ledger Accounts for personal property are: 1750 1759 1810 1819 1820 1829 1830 1832 1839

Equipment Accumulated Depreciation on Equipment Assets under Capital Lease Accumulated Depreciation on Assets under Capital Lease Leasehold Improvements Accumulated Amortization on Leasehold Improvements Internal-Use Software Internal-Use Software in Development Accumulated Amortization on Internal-Use Software

The total value of capitalized property recorded in the Property Accountability System shall be reconciled with the related balances shown in the FFS system by the Accounting Operations Center and the Property Management Officer, WASO on a monthly basis. Any differences disclosed as a result of the reconciliation shall be investigated to determine the cause of the differences and to identify necessary improvements in the process to prevent errors, losses, or irregularities. Any differences disclosed shall be effectively coordinated with the appropriate field area office involved to ensure that the records are reconciled and adjusted, in accordance with sound accounting practices, to bring the property accountability records and the general ledger account into complete agreement. Museum property generally does not depreciate and shall not be recorded in a general ledger account. 2.5 -- Property Accountability Records Detailed accountability records shall be established and maintained in the FAS to reflect our investment in system controlled property. The records must contain all items of systemcontrolled property to include accountable property costing $5,000 - $14,999.99, capitalized property ($15,000 and above) and sensitive property (regardless of the acquisition cost) acquired by purchase, transfer, lease or loan of one year or more, authorized donation, or other means. Property accountability records must be established and maintained for all system controlled property in the custody of the Government. These records shall be subject to audit and all entries must be supported by valid acquisition and disposal documents. Records disposal is governed by established records retention requirements.

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·

Capital leases are leases that transfer substantially all the benefits and risks of ownership to the lessee. If, at its inception, a lease meets one or more of the following four criteria, the lease should be classified as a capital lease by the lessee. Otherwise, it should be classified as an operating lease.

1. The lease transfers ownership of the property to the lessee by the end of the lease term.

2. The lease contains an option to purchase the leased property at a bargain price.

3. The lease term is equal to or greater than 75 percent of the estimated economic life of the leased property.

4. The present value of rental and other minimum lease payments, excluding that portion of the payments representing executor cost, equals or exceeds 90 percent of the fair value of the leased property.

The last two criteria are not applicable when the beginning of the lease term falls within the last 25 percent of the total estimated economic life of the leased property. ·

Accountable property in the custody of contractors, grantees, cooperators, concessionaires, or other non-Federal recipients. Accountability records must be established and maintained for all Government-owned property in the custody of a contractor, grantee, cooperator, concessionaire, or other non-Federal recipient in accordance with the terms of any legal instrument. This property shall be subject to the same inventory, reconciliation and management controls as any other accountable property held by the NPS/office. The Government employee who is responsible for authorizing non-Federal use of Government property is responsible for transmitting information regarding such Government furnished property to the Property Management Officer (PMO).

·

The Contracting/Grants Officers, or other authorizing official, will be responsible for the accomplishment of the physical inventories, and the reconciliation of any discrepancies revealed by such inventory, or for ensuring such inventories are accomplished in accordance with contractor/grantee’s approved Property Accountability System, Completed and certified inventories will be provided to the PMO by the Contracting/Grants Officer, or official who authorized such use. (See Federal Acquisition Regulation Part 45).

·

Transfers without Reimbursement between Interior Entities: Personal property transferred without reimbursement to another Interior bureau/office will be recorded as a decrease to the asset and accumulated depreciation accounts of the transferring bureau/office and as an increase to the asset and accumulated depreciation accounts of the receiving bureau/office at the same amount.

·

Transfers with Reimbursement between Interior Entities: Personal property transferred with reimbursement to another Interior bureau/office would generally be

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recorded on the receiving bureau/office’s books at the amount of reimbursement to the transferor plus all associated incidental costs. However, such transfers must be reviewed with the Office of Financial Management and the auditors to ensure that the financial records of Interior as a whole are not affected. ·

Transfers without Reimbursement between Interior and Another Federal Entity: In most cases, transfers of personal property between Federal entities occur without reimbursement to the transferor for the value of the asset. Incidental payments or costs associated with the transfer, including documentation, etc., are not considered reimbursement for the value of the asset. Transfers without reimbursement are recorded in Interior’s accounts at the net book value of the transferor plus all associate incidental costs. If the transferor’s net book value is not determinable, the estimated fair market value of the property plus all associated incidental costs should be recognized.

·

The date the transferor originally acquired the personal property should be obtained for calculation of depreciation. If the original date of acquisition cannot be obtained, it shall be estimated in coordination with appropriate technical and property officials.

·

Transfers with Reimbursement between Interior and Another Federal Entity: Personal property transferred to or from another Federal entity with reimbursement to that entity for the value of the property will be recorded on the receiving office’s books at the amount of reimbursement to the transferor plus all associated incidental costs. Incidental payments and costs associated with the transfer, including documentation, etc., are not considered reimbursement for the value of the asset, but are treated as a component of the costs.

·

Monthly reconciliation of accounts: The total value of capitalized property recorded in the property accountability records shall be compared with the related balances shown in the general ledger control account at least monthly. Property records must be integrated with or reconciled with the related general ledger account. Any differences disclosed as a result of this comparison shall be investigated to determine the cause of the differences and to identify necessary improvements in the process to prevent errors, losses or irregularities. All differences must also be adequately documented, reconciled and adjusted in accordance with sound accounting practices to bring the property accountability records and the general ledger account into complete agreement.

Museum property records are maintained in the National Catalog of Museum Objects, and in appropriate park files according to the NPS Museum Handbook. Property acquired on a lease or loan must not be entered into the general ledger account. 2.6 -- Property Records Retention and Disposal The following General Records Schedules pertain to the retention or disposal of personal property records: General Records Schedule 3, Procurement, Supply, and Grant Records; General Records Schedule 4, Property Disposal Records; General Records Schedule 8, Stores, Plant, and Cost Accounting Records; and General Records Schedule 10, Motor Vehicle Maintenance and Operation Records. Personal property records are to be retained, or disposed of, in accordance with these General Records Schedules. Bureaus/offices may retain records

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beyond the General Records Schedule requirements at their discretion. 2.7 -- Accountable Property Officer - Relief of Accountability Property accountability remains fixed until an Accountable Property Officer is relieved by one of the following: (1) Transfer of accountability to another Accountable Property Officer within the NPS; (2) Transfer of excess property to another Government agency, eligible Indian Tribe, or other eligible recipient; (3) Sale of property; (4) Authorized condemnation, destruction, abandonment or donation; (5) Board of Survey procedures; (6) Termination of lease or loan agreement.

2.8 -- Custodial Property Officer - Relief of Accountability When Custodial Property Officers are relieved of their responsibility for personal property, it is the responsibility of the Accountable Property Officer to ensure that property entrusted to that individual is accounted for. A physical inventory of the Custodial Property Officer's property shall be taken of all property in the custody or realm of his or her responsibility upon separation, transfer, or reassignment, or the Accountable Property Officer may require a written statement that all property entrusted to that person is accounted for. The latter method shifts responsibility for any shortages to the Accountable Property Officer. 2.9 -- Transfer of Accountability In accordance with Departmental and GSA requirements, when an Accountable, Custodial, or Liaison Officer is to be relieved of accountability, the outgoing Officer is responsible for conducting a 100 percent inventory of the property for which they are accountable. Any shortages or overages shall be reconciled prior to their departure. The incoming Officer shall assume total responsibility and control of Government owned, leased and/or loaned property involved in the transfer of accountability. In the event that the incoming Officer is not available at the time of the outgoing Officer's departure, accountability for the property shall be transferred to an interim or acting Officer. The designations of Custodial Property Officers made by the outgoing Accountable Property Officer shall remain in effect until rescinded, in writing, by the new permanent Accountable Property Officer. 2.10 -- Responsibility Records Accountable Property Officers shall establish file folders for each Custodial Property Officer to

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whom system controlled property is assigned. Each file must contain the signed annual inventory certifications. Copies of signed DI-102 Receiving Report, DI-105 Property Receipt documents and DI-104 Transfer of Property documents shall be maintained until the property records have been adjusted and a new certification signed. This will allow the total holdings of capitalized/sensitive property in the possession of each employee to be determined readily. Items in common use, but not in the custody of any cognizant employee must be assigned to a Custodial Property Officer. Any employee having custody or use of Government-owned property may be held financially liable by a Survey Authority for its loss or damage whether or not the employee has signed a receipt for the property. Non-sensitive property costing less than $5,000 is not accounted for in the Property Accountability System; however, property records are to be maintained to ensure that appropriate safeguards and controls are established at the operating office level to guard against the following conditions: (1) Excessive losses; (2) Excessive purchases or withdrawals when compared to program requirements, or; (3) Use of property for other than official purposes. 2.11 -- Property Clearance Prior to separation, transfer, or reassignment an employee must inventory all of the property assigned to him or her and obtain a signed property clearance form from the Property Management Office. When the employee is separated or transferred out of the NPS, certification for final salary payment shall be withheld until all property is satisfactorily accounted for. 2.12 -- Property Pass DI-1934 "Property Pass" or equivalent NPS form shall be used when personal property is removed from the work place. Property passes shall be approved by the Custodial Property Officer for that property or their designated Property Liaison Officer. Custodial Property Officers are responsible for ensuring that the building security personnel have on file, the signatures of those persons designated to sign property passes. Form DI-1934 or an equivalent form may also be used as a long-term property pass. Accountable Property Officers are responsible for working with applicable security personnel to establish written management procedures for use of the pass. The long term property pass shall be signed by the Custodial Property Officer of the property. The pass may be used in a generic form for personnel who are responsible for moving property from one building to another on a routine basis. The time limit on a long-term property pass must not exceed one year. Controls for periodic checks shall be established by the Custodial Property Officer. The form shall be marked with the words "LONG TERM" to distinguish it from passes that are issued for shorter durations. When the form is used for a long term, strike out the words “Property Passes are valid for 90 days from the date issued.” All property issued on a property pass must be returned before an

32

employee leaves the position occupied at the time of issuance of the pass. 2.13 -- Use of Government-owned Property is Restricted No manager or employee of the Service may use or authorize the use of Government property for other than official purposes. (See 18 U.S.C. 641). Government-owned personal property may be furnished for use only when specific authority exists to do so, and then only within the scope, purpose, and limitations of the authority. Such authority may exist when the use of Government-owned property has been authorized within the written terms and conditions of a legally executed contract, grant, cooperative agreement, purchase order, or memorandum of understanding. The contracting/grants officer, or other authorized official for that legal instrument is the only official who can authorize the provision, acquisition, reimbursement, utilization or disposal of any Government property so involved. Unauthorized use of Government-owned property is prohibited. Property may not be used in or moved to an employee's residence, or other property not leased or rented by the Government unless specific written authority is granted by the Accountable Property Officer. The written authority must indicate the length of time that the employee is authorized such use, and specify the termination date of the authorization. Such authorization shall be granted only in instances when the employee is required to use property for official uses, and in the performance of assigned duties. The provisions of this paragraph do not apply to field equipment used in the performance of authorized work. Limited personal use of Government office equipment is allowable as long as the use occurs on on-duty time, does not interfere with official business, is not a commercial gain activity or is otherwise prohibited, and the expense to the Government is negligible. (See 410 DM 2, Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment and Library Collections).

The following provisions do not apply to GSA leased vehicles or property which is leased or rented by the Government:

(1) Non-Government-owned personal property shall not be installed in, affixed to, or otherwise made a part of any Government-owned personal or real property in a manner that makes the Government responsible for any loss or damage; or that has the potential to damage the Government-owned property involved. Non-Government-owned personal property may not be installed in, affixed to, or otherwise made a part of any Government-owned personal or real property in a manner that subjects the Government to any copyright or license agreement violations. No one may install software on Government-owned ADP equipment or use software for Government work in violation of a license agreement or copyright. (2) Employee-owned property may not be used in the performance of official duties, unless approved by the employee's supervisor and the Accountable Property Officer or specifically required by a labor union collective bargaining agreement. When authority is granted for an employee to use their own personal property in the performance of official Government duties, the property is to be used at the risk of the owner/employee, and the Government shall not be held financially liable for any damage or loss which may occur as a result of such use, unless such liability is defined by and assumed by the Service or office in an written agreement which is signed by the Accountable Property Officer and the employee’s 33

supervisor prior to using the property. The supervisor's and Accountable Property Officer's approvals are not required for the use and installation of privately-owned decorative items or memorabilia in the work place, provided that the structure or the safety of the facility is not thereby compromised and is not offensive to other employees. Such items should be already identified as to ownership. The requirement set forth in 41 CFR 101-25.100, which permits the use of Government-owned personal property in emergency situations which threaten loss of life or property, shall be followed in making determinations as to what constitutes official use under exceptional circumstances. 2.14 -- Property Management Reporting Requirements The NPS is required to submit recurring reports to the Department of the Interior and the General Services Administration. Accomplishment of the reporting requirements is an important function that requires full participation of all Service offices and activities. Decisions by the Congress, General Accounting Office, Office of Management and Budget, General Services Administration, Departmental and other regulatory authorities are frequently based upon the reported data. They have a direct and indirect impact upon all programs and activities of the NPS and the Department.

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Section 3: Personal Property Inventories 3.0 -- Property Inventories Responsibility Accountable Property Officers are responsible for ensuring that prescribed physical inventories are conducted. The Accountable Property Officer may delegate the conducting of the inventory to members of the property management staff, designated inventory teams, or to other employees within the Accountable Property Officer's area of responsibility. The nature of the operations and availability of personnel shall generally dictate the method best suited to the individual office or location. Contracting Officers are responsible for ensuring that property inventory requirements are incorporated into the appropriate clause(s) of contracts or agreements when Governmentowned property is provided to a contractor. Contractor employees may not enter data or make any adjustments to records via use of the Property Accountability System. All entries into the system shall be made by Park Service employees only. 3.1 -- Annual Physical Inventories The Accountable Property Officer is responsible for ensuring that prescribed physical inventories are conducted by Custodial Property Officers, members of the property management staff, designated inventory teams, or other employees within the Accountable Property Officer’s area of responsibility prior to September 30th of each fiscal year. The Custodial Property Officer’s major objective and primary role is to properly manage their assigned accountable/capitalized inventory. A special inventory must be conducted, if a Custodial Property Officer change or leaves the Service. In addition to the inventory requirements listed above, inventories are required once every three years for bureau managed property below the accountability threshold, whether Custodial Property Officers change or not. Museum property inventories shall comply with the procedures outlined in the Museum Handbook, Part II, Museum Records, chapter 4. Physical inventories require that all items be identified by visual inspection to ensure the accuracy of the inventory data (description, serial number, model number, condition, systemcontrolled, capitalized, utilization, etc. A complete physical inventory shall be conducted at least annually for the following categories of personal property: (a) System-controlled (any personal property costing $5,000.00 or more and sensitive property). (b)

Stores Account expendable materials and supplies.

3.2 -- Identifying and Counting When a physical inventory is required, all system controlled property actually located within a custodial area shall be identified and counted. The results shall be compared with the items listed on the inventory provided by the Accountable Property Officer. The situations that will

35

generally occur are: (1) Some items will be found which are not on the list. (2) Some items which are on the list will not be found. After the physical counting has been accomplished, if there are discrepancies, the Custodial Property Officer shall notify the Accountable Property Officer. Some of the causes for imbalances are as follows: (1) Property has been relocated but no documentation exists which records the relocation. (2) Property has been properly disposed of but records of the action cannot be found. (3) Sometimes neither the property nor the records can be found. (4) Further, no one admits to remembering that the property was even in the custodial area. 3.3 -- Advising the Accountable Property Officer After all differences have been reduced to the minimum possible, Custodial Property Officers shall advise the Accountable Property Officer in writing of the results of the inventory. (1) List all items found which are not on the inventory list. (2) List all items on the inventory list which were not found. (3) List all accountable/sensitive items found whether on the inventory list or not that are no longer in a serviceable condition and must be replaced or repaired. (4) List all items found whether on the inventory list or not, that are no longer required for use. 3.4 -- Notification to the Accountable Property Officer This is a request that the necessary action be taken as a result of the physical inventory which shall: (1) Reconcile the inventory. (2) Dispose of property no longer required. (3) Initiate action to repair or replace unserviceable equipment. Special instructions may be established to provide for this action. If so, those instructions should be utilized.

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3.5 -- Accountable Property Officer Action The Accountable Property Officer, based on the notification in writing, shall advise the Custodial Property Officer on the next action. Among these are: (1) Initiate a Report of Survey for missing items. (If the inventory occurred as a result of replacing the Custodial Property Officer, this is the former Custodial Property Officer's responsibility). (2) Initiate transfer or disposal action through the Accountable Property Officer for property no longer required (3) Initiate repairs or disposal action through the Accountable Property Officer for unserviceable property. (4) Add all found accountable/sensitive property which is not on the inventory listing. (5) Other instructions not included above. The result of these actions shall be posted to the Property Accountability System to reconcile the inventory list so that the items reflected on the inventory listing and the items physically located in the custodial area are identical. It is the responsibility of the Custodial Property Officer to maintain this condition until the next inventory. The primary purpose of a physical inventory is to account for and to adjust the inventory records accordingly. The records shall reflect what is actually on hand. After meeting the minimum requirements, Custodial Property Officers and Accountable Property Officers shall decide whether more frequent inventories are necessary. 3.6 -- Additions to the Inventory Additions to the inventory most commonly occur when a need or a requirement is generated in a program for an item of personal property which is not currently available. The need exists, but the ability to meet the need from assets within the custodial area does not. 3.7 -- Subtractions from the Inventory Subtractions from the inventory occur in a number of ways. The predominant cause for a subtraction is that an item is no longer required in order to accomplish and support the program responsibilities assigned to the custodial area. Even though the property is no longer required, responsibility for properly safeguarding the property still exists. The Custodial Property Officer retains responsibility until such time as proper documentation is prepared and authenticated which supports the subtraction, and the property is physically removed from the Custodial Property Officer’s control. When this has been accomplished, the Custodial Property Officer’s inventory and the related property hand receipts must be annotated, document numbers referenced, and the documentation filed to support the transaction. Under no circumstances shall a Custodial Property Officer permit property to be removed from the custodial area without obtaining a property receipt which serves as documentation that

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relieves him or her of responsibility for the item. The inventory and hand receipts shall be filed as substantiating documents. Other methods of effecting subtraction from the inventory are as follows: (1)

Certificates of Unserviceable Property and Reports of Survey for lost, stolen, damaged or destroyed property.

(2)

The DI-104 Transfer of Property form is used to transfer property to another custodial area or agencies within the Department and the SF 122, for transfers to other agencies/bureaus. Nothing is to move outside of the custodial area without proper documentation. Custodial Property Officers are responsible for the property until properly relieved of the responsibility.

3.8 -- Special Inventories A physical inventory should be taken of all accountable property in the custody of an individual employee prior to their transfer or separation. A Report of Survey or Certificate of Unserviceable Property may be required for any items of property not accounted for at the time of transfer or separation in accordance with the provisions of IPMD, Subpart 114-60.8. The Accountable Property Officer shall ensure that a special inventory is conducted by each Custodial Property Officer of all accountable property in his or her custody at least 14 days prior to transfer or separation. Property transfers for items physically in the possession of other employees must be completed or the property returned. Special inventories may be required during audits; changes of Accountable or Custodial Property Officers, or other special circumstances. Whenever there is a change of Accountable Property Officers, the procedures outlined in IPMD Subpart 114-60.203 or 114-60.204 for transferring accountability shall be observed. 3.9 -- Annual Inventory Reconciliation The results of the annual and/or special physical inventories shall be compared with the quantities recorded in stores, accountability, Federal Finance System (FFS), and other records that are maintained for inventory management purposes. Any differences between the physical count of property on hand and the quantity balance reflected in the property records shall be promptly investigated to determine the cause of the differences, and to identify necessary improvements in the process to prevent errors, losses, or irregularities. Reports of Survey shall be initiated to account for unresolved property shortages. Property records and the related general ledger accounts shall be reconciled and brought into agreement based upon the results of physical inventories. Reconciliation and adjustments of the physical inventory of the property must be completed prior to September 30th of each calendar year. 3.10 -- Inventory Certification Statements The certification statement should read as follows:

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CUSTODIAL PROPERTY OFFICER'S STATEMENT I certify that I have, jointly with (*the employee whom I am relieving-*the Accountable Property Officer or his designee), taken an inventory, or to my satisfaction have otherwise verified the account or record of the property for which I am assuming custodial responsibility. I understand and accept the responsibilities of the Custodial Property Officer as stated in this handbook. I have read the part of this handbook which describes responsibilities of Custodial Property Officers. Upon transfer of my responsibilities to a successor, I will take a joint inventory or otherwise verify the custodial account to the satisfaction of my successor and together with the Accountable Property Officer will, in the manner prescribed, adjust such differences as may be discovered. (signed) ________________________________________(Date)_____________ Name/Title/Date

After review and completion of the annual physical inventory and the reconciliation and adjustment of property records, the Accountable Property Officers shall certify in writing to the Property Administrator that all inventories for which they are responsible have been conducted and that subsidiary property records reflect actual quantities on hand. The Property Administrator shall certify in writing to the Property Management Officer, WASO that all physical inventories have been conducted for the offices/parks under his or her jurisdiction. The certification statement on the inventory report should read as follows: I certify that all physical inventories for which I am responsible have been completed, and that subsidiary property records reflect actual quantities on hand. All property records have been reconciled and adjustments made to the Property Accountability System. All property records and the related general ledger accounts have been brought into agreement based upon the results of the physical inventories. (signature and date) Property Administrator (Regional Director/Center Manager) The signed certification statement is due to the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO prior to September 30th of each calendar year. Regional and center offices may require that periodic inventory reports be submitted in detail, including results of the physical inventory and the reconciliation with property and accounting records. Museum property inventories are submitted in full. 3.11 -- Inventory Reports The Property Management Officer must certify in writing through the Comptroller, to the Director, Office of Property Management, prior to October 31st of each calendar year, that their respective bureau/office has completed and reconciled physical inventories for all Accountable Property Officers.

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In addition to the certifications, regional/center office levels may require that periodic inventory reports be submitted in detail, including the results of the physical inventory and the reconciliation with property and accounting records. 3.12 -- Inventory Document Retention All annual physical inventory documentation, including notes and/or printouts used in the inventory process shall be retained until the third succeeding inventory has been completed. The earlier records may then be removed from the files. 3.13 -- Replacement Bar Code Labels When conducting an inventory, replace illegible, marred or damaged property number identification labels. Replacement and/or new barcode labels may be ordered from the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO. 3.14 -- Leased Property Inventory Leased property must be identified in the Property Accountability System. Inventory all leased property for which formal property accounting records are maintained, and reconcile the results of the inventory with accounting records. If leased or rented property items are found, which are not labeled and are not maintained in the Property Accountability System database, determine whether the items meet the formal property accounting criteria and whether lease/rental agreements extend beyond one year. If so, establish formal accountability property records in the system.

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3.15 -- Capital versus Operating Leases

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Section 4: Classification of Property 4.0 -- Responsibility Property management personnel shall classify all items of personal property as expendable or non-expendable and by the appropriate Federal Stock Class (FSC) as defined in Subpart DM11460.100. Non-expendable property shall be further classified to indicate whether it is systemcontrolled, bureau-managed, capitalized, sensitive, accountable, or stores property. The Property Management Officer shall issue instructions to ensure personal property is classified in a uniform manner and in accordance with the provisions of the above referenced Subpart, which include a listing of the non-expendable property items commonly used by the NPS/office, an updated listing of new items not previously classified, and a listing for use by all NPS/office Accountable Property Officers and their property management staffs. Museum property is classified according to the NPS Museum Handbook. 4.1 -- Personal Property Classification Within the Federal Government property is classified as either real or personal. Real property is defined as any interest in land together with improvements, structures and fixtures, and appurtenances. Personal property is all property other than real property, and is further classified as expendable or non-expendable. 4.2 -- Classification Criteria To determine the proper classification of items of non-expendable property, consider such factors as acquisition cost, expected useful life, nature of use, sensitivity, cost of maintaining accountability and/or responsibility records compared with cost of possible increased losses if such records are not maintained, and any other factors which may affect the classification. The classification will determine the type of inventory control and accounting records required. Expendable property is property which is consumed in use, within a year or less and consists of supplies and materials which are not reusable. A few typical examples are fuels, raw materials, and office supplies such as paper and pencils. Non-expendable property is property that retains its identity throughout its useful life, which is normally anticipated to be two years or longer, is reusable for the same function, must be accounted for throughout its useful life, and is defined as equipment. If an individual item of non-expendable property has an acquisition value of $5000 or more, it must be individually accounted for in the Property Accountability System and accounting records. Custodial Property Officers are equally responsible for both the capitalized and non-capitalized nonexpendable property which is assigned to their custodial areas. Personal property is further classified to indicate whether it is system-controlled, i.e., sensitive, capitalized or non-capitalized by utilizing the appropriate object class code. The correct code must be assigned to each line item on a purchase order using the description of the item and unit cost to determine the correct code to use. The following object class codes will be used in the Property Accountability System when establishing property records, unless otherwise changed by the Accounting and Operations Center:

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1 2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

311A 311A, 311D, 311E, 311H, 311J, 311K, 311L 311B 311D 311E 311H 311J 311K 311L

10 11 12

311Z 312A 312B

13 14

312D 312E

15

312F

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

312G 312H 312J 312K 312P 312T 312X

Capitalized Equipment Capitalized Lease Equipment

Capitalized Equipment on Loan Capitalized – Information Technology Software Capitalized – Information Technology Equipment Capitalized – Furniture & Fixtures Capitalized – Copier/Duplicator Capitalized Heavy Machinery Capitalized Transportation Equipment (Motor Vehicles & Horses) Motor Vehicle Proceeds Expended Non-Capitalized – Controlled Equipment Non-Capitalized – Non Controlled Equipment (Equipment not on the official sensitive property listing, that cost less than $5,000) Non-Capitalized –Information Technology Software Non-Capitalized - Information Technology Equipment Controlled (IT Equipment on the official sensitive property listing, regardless of cost) Non-Capitalized - Information Technology Equipment - NonControlled (IT Equipment not on the official sensitive property listing that cost between $5,000 - 14,999.99) Non-Capitalized – Furniture & Fixtures, Controlled Non-Capitalized – Furniture & Fixtures, Non-Controlled Non-Capitalized – Copier/Duplicator Non-Capitalized – Heavy Machinery Publications, Permanent Collections Non-Capitalized Vehicles (Includes horses) Artwork & Artifacts

Sensitive property shall be classified as system-controlled property regardless of the original acquisition cost. All museum property is controlled through accessioning and cataloging procedures, regardless of value.

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Section 5: Receipt of Property and Services 5.0 -- Scope This section prescribes policy and basic requirements for properly documenting the receipt of personal property and services. The NPS shall formally document the receipt of all personal property, regardless of the method or source of acquisition. This includes, but is not limited to, purchase card transactions, property that is acquired from commercial sources, fabricated in Government shops, donated, loaned, recovered or obtained by transfer from another Government agency. Museum property is received and documented in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II, Chapter 2. 5.1 -- Policy Property and services received by Property personnel shall be recorded on a receiving report to (1) provide a record of receipt, (2) provide a document of entry to the records and accounts, (3) provide an audit trail, and (4) substantiate the disbursement voucher. In accordance with Departmental and NPS requirements, appropriate receiving documents shall be prepared immediately upon completion of inspection, acceptance and receipt. Handling shall be expedited for receiving reports involving prompt payment discounts. Formal receiving documents are not required for micro purchases made by purchase card of non-sensitive items. The store receipt or packing slip is considered sufficient receiving documentation for these transactions. The Receiving Officer/Purchase Card Holder cannot be the Accountable Property Officer. The requisitioning office is responsible for ensuring that the item(s) requested are properly justified and reflect only those items required for the operation of the park or office, and ensuring that items procured are used only for official Government purposes. The Government-wide purchase card may be used to acquire personal property items in accordance with this handbook, the Federal Acquisition Regulations, Departmental Directives, and the $3,000 purchase card single purchase threshold. The only exceptions are the sensitive property items listed in Section 2.0 of this handbook. (1) Sensitive property with the exception of firearms may only be purchased by a Warranted Contracting Officer. (2) Firearms and ammunition may not be purchased by anyone using the purchase card or third party drafts. These items must be purchased via purchase order only. All sensitive property, regardless of cost, accountable property costing $5,000 or more and capitalized property must be entered into the Property Accountability System within 10 working days upon receipt. However, in order to balance the general ledger account as of 30 September, all capitalized property must be entered into the system within the same Fiscal Year of the purchase. 5.2 -- Basic Receiving Principles In accordance with Departmental and NPS requirements, the Accountable Property Officer or

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other designated officials must observe basic principles and take specific actions when assigning responsibility for receiving Government property and services, and documenting receipts. These are as follows: (a) Designation of Receiving Officer. The Receiving Officers do not have to be designated in writing to receive all accountable and sensitive property at each location in his or her area of accountability. (b) Under no circumstances will the Receiving Officer for capitalized/sensitive property also be the individual who makes the procurement award. (c) Acknowledging receipt of property and services. The Receiving Officer (including purchase cardholders) is responsible for the inspection, and receipt of personal property and services, and for ensuring that the required documentation is processed. All incoming shipments shall be physically counted and inspected to ensure that the quantity ordered was delivered and that articles received adhere to the specifications. (d) All apparent defects or damages to the property shall be noted on the receiving document at the time of inspection. (e) Establishing initial accountability for property. The Receiving Officer is accountable for property received until the item is placed on the property records of the Accountable Property Officer, or the Accountable or Custodial Property Officer signs a receipt for such property. Purchase Cardholders and managers are accountable for property they purchase until or unless accountability is formally transferred to another or as otherwise specified by the Accountable Property Officer. Purchase Cardholders must coordinate with the Receiving Officer to ensure that all accountable property, is affixed with a U.S. Government label and that all capitalized and sensitive property items are affixed with a U.S. Government label and an NPS barcode label and entered into the Property Accountability System within five working days upon receipt. 5.3 –Documentation of Receipts DI-102 "Receiving Reports" shall be used to provide the necessary documentation prescribed in this section. In addition, the following documents are authorized for use in documenting receipts of personal property: (1) The receiving report copy of the purchase order, invoice, voucher, or Standard Form 44 when such form is used to make purchases. (2) The receiving report copy of the purchase order, invoice, voucher, or Optional Form 347 when such form is used to make a purchase. (3) Copies of individual purchase order forms and purchase card vouchers/ transaction documents provided that copies are appropriately designated as receiving report copies.

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(4) Copies of commercial shop repair order forms, provided that the copies show appropriate accounting information and are signed by an individual sufficiently familiar with the equipment being repaired and received. An Accession Receiving Report shall be used to document receipt of museum property. A Deed of Gift, Incoming Loan Form, DI-1 (Requisition), DI-104 (Transfer of Property), DI-105 (Receipt for Supplies/Services), exchange agreement, loan agreement, OF-347 (Order for Supplies and Services), or last will and testament may also contain receiving information and may be made a part of the Accession Receiving Report as appropriate. For audit purposes, cardholders are responsible for: (1) annotating the item description, manufacturer, model and serial number of the item on the statement; and (2) maintaining the original receipts for the items that they acquire with the purchase card for a period of three years. Additional procedures are referenced in the NPS Purchase Card Manual.

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Section 6: Identification of Personal Property 6.0 -- Government Ownership Identification Markings All Government property that is non-expendable, non-sensitive, and non-capitalized, except that which is exempted by IPMD 410 DM 114-601, shall be marked to identify it as Government owned property. Markings shall consist of the name or initials of the NPS preceded by the initials "U.S." Motor vehicles shall be marked in accordance with Federal Property Management Regulations (FPMR), Federal Management Regulations (FMR) and IPMD requirements. Museum property is marked in accordance with procedures outlined in the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II Museum Records. 6.1 -- Exemption A very small or delicate apparatus, which cannot be marked without damage to the property, is excluded from marking or numbering. Additionally, items routinely used by Law Enforcement personnel in undercover or other sensitive operations where identification as Government or NPS property could compromise operations and/or the Safety Officers are exempted from marking or numbering requirements. However, the numbers assigned to items of systemcontrolled property exempted in accordance with this section, shall be recorded on the property accountability records. Permanent markings on museum property are potentially damaging. Therefore, items in museum collections are exempted from the marking requirements of this section. 6.2 -- Assignment & Display of Property Numbers In addition to the requirements of IPMD 410 DM 114-60, all system-controlled property items shall be marked with a U.S. Government label and a Service barcode label. 6.3 -- Items Requiring Special Identification The following items of property must display special identification: Motor vehicle identification: Motor vehicle identification must be displayed on all vehicles that we lease or purchase. In accordance with the Federal Management Regulation Part 102-34 Motor Vehicle Management, all motor vehicles owned or leased by the Government must display motor vehicle identification unless exempted under 102.34-180, 102-34.195, or 10234.200. The identification must be displayed as follows: (1) For motor vehicles with rear windows, display: (a) “For Official Use Only," in letters 1/2 to 3/4 inch high. This has been incorporated into Department of the Interior (DOI) vehicle license plate. There is no need to place in the rear window, if using the new license plates. (b) “U.S. Government" in letters 3/4 to 1 inch high. This has been incorporated into the DOI vehicle license plate. There is no need to place in the rear window, if

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using the new license plates. (c) The full name of the department, agency, establishment, corporation, or service owning or leasing the motor vehicle in letters 1 to 1/2 inch high, i.e. National Park Service. (2) For other than motor vehicle rear windows, display the motor vehicle identification in (a) (1) through (3) above, but: (a) Use letters 1 to 1/2 inches high in colors contrasting to the motor vehicle. (b) If you use subsidiary words or titles of subordinate units, use letters 1/2 inch to 3/4 inches high. (c) The preferred material is a decal of elastomeric pigmented film type for ease of application and removal. (3) Motor vehicle identification should be placed: (a) On most vehicles, identification must be placed on the left side of the rear window, 1 1/2 inches or less from the bottom of the window. (b) On motor vehicles without rear windows or where identification on the rear window would not be easily seen, identification must be centered on both front doors or in any appropriate position on each side of the motor vehicle. (c) On trailers, identification must be centered on both sides of the front quarter of the trailer in a conspicuous location. Livestock Identification/Markings: Livestock shall be marked through branding, tagging, tattooing, to indicate U.S. Government ownership. Records shall be maintained to fully identify individual animals. Records shall include the property number, pictures (front, side and rear), and a written description of the animal to include markings, scars, and etc. Watercraft Identification/Markings: Watercraft shall be marked in accordance with the requirements of IPMD 114-60.600 or IPMD 114-60.602. 6.4 -- Standardized Procedures for the Placement of Barcode Labels on Personal Property throughout the NPS This section prescribes the uniform method for the placement of U.S. Government and barcode labels on property items; i.e., computers, office equipment, motor vehicles and cameras. In addition, this procedure shall assure easy access to labels when using the barcode scanner for inventory purposes. (1) Description: U.S. Government and barcode labels are paper or metal with an adhesive backing. Barcode labels are alpha and/or numeric code.

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(2) Label Placement: Labels shall be placed on that portion of an item which will be visible when the item is in use. The preferred placement of labels is as follows: the upper right corner, upper left corner, upper center, lower right corner, lower left corner, and the lower center. When avoidable, labels should not be placed inside, underneath, or on an inconspicuous side or back of an item. When, cutting labels to fit an item, a one-fourth inch section shall be left on each side of the barcode label in order to permit the scanner to accurately read the label. If items are so small that the label will not fit, the numbers of the label may be cut off and placed on the item. In this case, the barcode number shall be manually keyed into the barcode reader during inventory. Desks, cabinets, and tables shall be labeled only with a U.S. Government label on the side where doors and drawers are located. Vehicles shall be labeled on inside door frames above the latch. Construction equipment shall be labeled adjacent to where operators mount or board the equipment. Tool boxes shall be labeled on the outside cover of the tool box. Label placement for boats and barges shall be in the pilot's house clearly visible on a non-removable surface on the instrument panel. 6.5 -- Labeling Procedures for Metal and Paper Pressure-sensitive Adhesive Type Labels (1) Clean Surface: Wipe application surface with a clean cloth using isopropyl alcohol or a comparable industrial solvent. Plastic surfaces shall be rubbed vigorously to remove mold release or silicone. A permanent bond cannot be achieved if grease, oil, wax, moisture, mold release, silicone, or dirt is present. (2) Handle with Care: Handle the label by the edges when removing the backing paper. Do not touch the exposed adhesive after the backing is removed. Apply the label immediately after removing the backing paper. (3) Bond Label: Apply the label firmly to the clean surface with a roller to make sure you squeeze out all excessive air. Be sure all the edges have a secure bond. Do not conduct a pry test until the adhesive has cured for a minimum of seven days. (4) Special Surfaces: Rough surfaces may require that 3M 847 adhesive be applied over the pressure-sensitive adhesive. Brush on the 3M 847 covering the entire area; allow 30 seconds to dry; then apply the label to the clean surface. Allow 30 to 45 seconds for adhesive to begin bonding, and then roll gently. Too much pressure will cause the 3M 847 adhesive to flow out from under the label. Adhesive 3M 847 is available in tubes. (5) Storage: Store labels with pressure-sensitive adhesive in a cool dry place (72 degrees or cooler). Store labels away from direct heat and/or sunlight. Each Regional/Center Property Manager is responsible for assigning the proper range of property identification numbers (barcode labels) to their parks. This will ensure that parks are not ordering duplicate property numbers. New and/or replacement barcode labels may be requested via memorandum from the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO, 1201 Eye Street, N.W., 12th Floor, Washington, DC, 20005, Attn: Carol Peay. The request must include the numbers to be embossed on the barcode labels, the point of contact, park name, and telephone number and E-Mail address. A completed return address label must accompany each request. All requests for new barcode labels must be submitted through the

49

Regional/Center Property Manager to the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO. There is no charge to parks or offices to order new and/or replacement labels.

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Section 7: Stores Records Management 7.0 -- General Stores Management Procedures are provided for establishing and maintaining control of property in storage for issue, as needed, from any supply activity in which a store’s account is involved. 7.1 -- General Ledger Control Account The value of store’s property acquired and disposed of shall be recorded in a general ledger control account where the quantity or value of items stocked, volumes of work, or other factors necessitate the establishment of a store’s account. At the discretion of the Property Management Officer, WASO and the Accounting and Operations Center, acquisitions of stores property in the following categories need not be recorded in a general ledger control account, but may be charged directly to the program or project benefited: (1) Materials and supplies purchased for immediate application on a specific project or job. (2) Materials and supplies purchased for single purposes, such as those procured against a bill of materials for a specific construction project, even though such materials may be stored for future use, consumption, or installation. In such cases, however, records showing quantity and descriptive information of the items involved must be maintained as necessary to ensure proper management and control of such inventories. 7.2 -- Storehouse Records The general ledger control account for stores shall be supported by detailed records to adequately identify the units of property and the costs of which are charged to the stores account. These records shall provide a permanent record of the acquisition and disposition of all stores items, as well as information needed for inventory control and management purposes. Storehouse records are subject to both internal and external audits and all entries made therein must be adequately supported by valid acquisition, issue, and disposal documents. All stores records shall be returned and disposed of according to General Records Schedule Eight, items one through four. 7.3 -- Periodic Reconciliation Both stores records and the related stores accounts shall be brought into agreement based upon the results of physical inventories at least once each year. Stores records shall be reconciled with the related general ledger accounts. Any differences between the physical count of property on hand and the quantity balance reflected in the stores records shall be promptly investigated to determine the causes of the differences, and to identify necessary improvements in the process to prevent errors, losses, or irregularities. Property losses shall be reported to the Property Manager and a Report of Survey must be prepared. The differences shall be documented, reconciled and adjusted, in accordance with sound accounting practices. 7.4 -- Designation of Employees Authorized to Withdraw Property from a Storehouse In accordance with DM 114-60.703 and to ensure that property will not be issued indiscriminately,

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the Accountable Property Officer shall designate, by name, in writing, the employees to whom materials and supplies may be issued, and/or to whom responsibility for non-expendable property may be assigned. The number of designees should be held to the lowest practicable level. 7.5 -- Documentation of Issues All issues of stores property shall be adequately documented with a receipt obtained at the time the property is removed from the storehouse or other storage area. The DI-104, Transfer of Property or equivalent form shall be used for this purpose. (See IPMD 114-60.203). Issues of non-expendable property will be documented as prescribed in IPMD 114-60.7. 7.6 -- Records and Control of Tax-free Alcohol In accordance with Departmental and NPS requirements, request for permits to procure Spirits, Free of Tax shall be submitted to the Property Management Program Manager, WASO. Property Administrators, Superintendents and management officials are responsible for establishing inventory controls at each installation authorized to procure and use tax-free alcohol to ensure that: (1) Purchases of tax-free alcohol are restricted to amounts reasonably commensurate with foreseeable requirements. (2) Inventories are maintained at minimum levels consistent with anticipated needs. (3) Receipts and issues from inventory are documented and processed in conformance with the formal stores accounting methods prescribed in this section. (4) Inventory and working stocks of tax-free alcohol are stored in a secure area with access limited to designated personnel. (5) Withdrawals from inventory are made only upon written authorization stating the use to be made of the alcohol and the exact quantity to be issued. 7.7 -- Annual Review and Report of Tax-free Alcohol An annual review shall be made of all tax-free alcohol transactions to include: (1) Verification of inventory and working stock balances. (2) Analysis of purchases, receipts, and issues. (3) Verification of official use. (4) Full disclosure and reconciliation of unaccountable quantities. (5) Check entire alcohol handling operation for compliance with applicable regulations.

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If the annual review discloses (a) excessive purchases or use of alcohol in relation to the work performed; (b) inadequate physical or record controls; or (c) any indication of possible unauthorized use, a written report of such disclosure, including supporting details, must be made to the Property Management Officer, WASO for appropriate remedial action. 7.8 -- Central Supply Items Centrall Supply items are supplies such as forms, decals, badges, patches, license plates, boundary signs, etc. These items are purchased under consolidated Service procurement programs. These are generally items that can be economically obtained only on a quantity quan basis and where suppliers are not willing to process numerous small orders for each field area. Listed below are the Central Supply Items for the NPS:

Item No.

CS-1

CS-2

Item Description

Picture

Badge, National Park Service Ranger, Gold

Holder, Aluminum Aluminum- for Violation Notice Forms

Decals, Property (Unnumbered) CS-3

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Badges, Patch Cloth CS-4

Ornament, Collar (Gold) Pair CS-5

CS-6

Reserved

Patches, Shoulder (3 3/4" x 3") CS-7

Patches, Cap (2 1/2" x 2") CS-8

CS-9

Reserved

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Pennants, Boat (8" X 12") CS-10

Pennants, Boat (12" X 20") CS-11

Pennants, Boat (18" X 30") CS-12

Pennants, Boat (24" X 40") CS-13

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Pennants, Boat (44" X 68") CS-14

CS-15

Decals, Vehicles (NPS Vehicles Only) Currently Not Available

CS-16

CS-17

Decals, Hard Hat (NPS Emblem)

Reserved

Stand's Only CS-18

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CS-19

Reserved

CS-20

License Plates Official Government Tags

CS-21

Park Ranger Decals (Green on Green)

CS-22

Reserved

CS-24

Reserved

CS-25

CS-26

Decals Arrowhead for use with GSA Motor Pool Vehicles only

Boundary Line Sign, Plastic, Horizontal

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Boundary Sign, Plastic, Vertical CS-27

CS-28

License Plates, Motorcycle and Scooter

Sign, (Fee Area) 18" CS-29A

Sign, (Fee Area) 9" CS-29B

CS-30

Decals, Arrowhead ( 12") Law Enforcement Vehicles

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Patch, V.I.P (Shoulder) CS-31

CS-32

Decals, Vandalism, Warning (Black Print)

CS-33

Decals, Vandalism, Warning (White Print)

CS-34

CS-35

CS-36

Decals, Arrowhead ( 7") Law Enforcement Vehicles

Decals, Arrowhead ( 8") Law Enforcement Vehicles

Decals, Park Ranger ( Black on White)

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VIP, Patch (Cap) 2 1/2" x 3" CS-37 Currently Not Available

CS-38

CS-39

CS-40

CS-41

Decal, VIP, Hard Hats 2" x 2 1/2"

Tape Reflective, Vehicles (Green) 4", Law enforcement Vehicles

Sign, Danger (Fumigation in Progress) 10" x 9"

Sign (Area Closed at Dark) 10" x 10"

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CS-42

CS-43

CS-44

Sign (National Park Boundary) 10" x 11"

Sign (Limites De Parque Nacional) 10" x 12"

Sign (This is a National Park) 10" x 13"

Sign (This Building) 10" x 14" CS-45

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CS-46

Sign, Notice (No Hunting or Trapping) 10" x 15"

Sign (Fire Tools) 10" x 16" CS-47

Sign, (Notice) 10" x 17" CS-48

10" Arrowhead Magnetic CS-49I

CS-50I

For Official Use Only (Magnetic) 3 1/2' x 14"

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CS-51I

For Official Use Only (Rear Window Decal) 3 1/2' x 14"

Park Ranger Magnetic 4" x 32" CS-52I

Green Magnetic Tape 4" x 28" CS-53I

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7.9 -- Program Office Responsibilities The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO is responsible for: (1) Determining what item(s) to include in the Central Supply System. (2) Budgeting for annual funding for Central Supply items. (3) Initiating procurement actions to procure items. (4) Developing procedures for the operation of Central Supply activities. (5) Providing oversight and guidance when requested by each activity. (6) Establishing stock levels and reorder points for all Central Supply items based on demand history/inventories provided by each activity. (7) Continually monitor the activities to ensure that adequate control is maintained when issuing and receiving Central Supply items. (8) Approving all requisitions for controlled items such as badges, shoulder and cap patches. (9) Providing disposal instructions to the activities when items become obsolete or whenever appropriate. (10) Ensuring that receiving reports are prepared accurately and in a timely fashion to comply with the "Prompt Pay Act" to avoid late interest penalties. (11) Acting as the Reviewing Authority for all Reports of Survey as a result of theft, damage, and losses discovered during inventories at each Central Supply activity. 7.10 -- Central Supply Operation The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO and other applicable program offices shall determine, based on field needs and the criteria contained in this section, what item(s) should be considered for inclusion in Central Supply. A memorandum justifying the requirement for including the items in Central Supply will be furnished to the Property Management Program Manager, WASO. The request shall include detailed written specifications, drawings for the item(s), the quantity required for a one year supply, and a signed DI-1 "Requisition.” Each responsible program office shall be required to provide the necessary funding for the first year's supply. The Property Management Program Manager, WASO and other applicable program offices will request the required funding during the budget cycle for subsequent annual restocking of the item(s). (1) The responsible program office(s) shall establish reorder points for each item and fund the 1st initial stock.

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(2) The responsible program office(s) shall continue to monitor issues and inventories of these items to ensure that quantities ordered by the park clusters and system support offices are not excessive. (3) The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO shall approve all requisitions from park clusters and system support offices for uniform insignia. These include badges, shoulder and cap patches. (4) Regional/Center Property Managers and Superintendents shall notify the Property Management Program Manager of any known or anticipated changes to the annual stock levels required (both increases and decreases). A signed hand receipt DI-105 "Receipt for Property" or comparable form shall be obtained each time a badge is issued to an employee. The hand receipt shall contain the description and serial number(s) of badge(s), and the signature of the employee receiving badge(s). Any annotations on the hand receipt, changing any of the above information shall be initialed and dated. The hand receipt shall be filed in a secure location and in a manner whereby it can be readily known what items have been issued to individuals. Responsible officials shall ensure that badges are turned in when an employee transfers, leaves the Service, or in the case of a seasonal employee, when the seasonal employment is terminated. Requisitioning offices are responsible for preparing and processing Reports of Survey on all Central Supply items that are lost, damaged, or stolen. In addition, Certificates of Unserviceable Property will be prepared and processed on all broken or worn out badges and license plates that are destroyed. Badges shall not be repaired. Reports of Survey and Certificates of Unserviceable Property shall be documented in accordance with IPMD 410 DM 114-60 and section 8 of this handbook. Reports of Survey and Certificates of Unserviceable Property initiated at the requisitioning offices shall be processed in the same manner as other Reports of Survey or Certificates of Unserviceable Property initiated at the park/unit or office. When ordering replacement badges, a copy of the report of survey or certificate of unserviceable property form must be attached to the requisition. 7.11 -- Central Supply Stock Record Cards and Semi Annual Inventories Each facility shall maintain accurate up-to-date stock record cards or other appropriate automated records for each Central Supply item. Issues and/or receipts shall be posted on a daily basis. The name of the park/unit or office shall be entered on each issue transaction. Badge serial numbers and license plate numbers shall also be entered when appropriate. Semi-annual physical inventories shall be accomplished at each Central Supply Warehouse facility. Inventories shall be taken as of March 15 and September 15 of each calendar year. Inventories shall be reconciled with the property records. Overages shall be posted to the stock record cards or other appropriate automated records as receipts. Shortages shall be investigated and documented on a Report of Survey in accordance with IPMD 410 DM 114-60 and section 8 of this handbook. At the completion of each inventory, each activity shall produce a stock record card or provide other appropriate data that reflects issues made during the past 6-month period. The inventory shall be forwarded to the Property Management Program Manager. These records shall be used to adjust stock levels and/or adjust reorder points. Reports of Survey as a result of inventory shortages shall be forwarded to the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO for review and approval.

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7.12 -- Storage of Central Supply Item(s) Adequate storage facilities and security shall be provided for all items. It is mandatory that badges, patches, collar ornaments, and license plates be stored in a locked cabinet. Other items shall be secured in a locked cabinet whenever possible. 7.13 -- Central Supply Activity Locations and Responsibilities All parks and offices located east of the Mississippi River shall send their requisitions via the electronic Central Supply Inventory Management System to National Capital Region Brentwood Warehouse http://npssurvey.nps.gov/pjr/login.asp. The Warehouse point of contact may be reached at (202) 426-6900. All parks and offices located west of the Mississippi River shall send their requisitions via the electronic Central Supply Inventory Management System to Rocky Mountain National Park Warehouse http://npssurvey.nps.gov/pjr/login.asp. The Warehouse point of contact may be reached at (970) 586-1272. All orders for the controlled items must be approved by the Superintendent and the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO for the CS-1 badge, CS-7 shoulder patches, CS-8 cap patches and CS-20 license plates, and CS-28 Motorcycle/Scooter license plates. This function will be transparent to the system user and will be performed automatically, when controlled items are ordered via the system. Central Supply Warehouse personnel responsibilities are as follows: (1) Ensure that current and accurate records are maintained to reflect issues and receipts for all items. (2) Conduct semi-annual physical inventories of all items and reconcile property records to reflect correct balances. Provide copies of inventories to the Property Management Program Manager, WASO by March 15th and September 15th each calendar year. (3) Ensure that all requests from the requisitioning offices contain a valid justification, and that requisitions have proper signatures, etc. (4) Fill orders from requisitioning offices promptly. (5) Ensure that adequate storage is provided. (6) Ensure that adequate security is maintained to guard against theft, fraud, waste, and abuse. (7) Act as the Receiving Officer for all incoming shipments. (8) Apply overall property management principles for all items at each activity. (9) Ensure that no more than 50 Central Supply items are requisitioned by each park per quarter, with the exception of Boundary signs (500 per quarter). DI-1 "Requisition"

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requests for Central Supply items that exceed the allotted quantity shall have a valid justification and approval signature of the superintendent or responsible management official. (10) Prepare and process Reports of Survey, as required, in accordance with IPMD 410 DM 114-60 and section 8 of this handbook. 7.14 -- Instructions for Requisitioning Central Supply Items Requisitioning offices shall order only those items that are essential to the operation of the park/unit or office. All Central Supply items shall be ordered via the NPS Central Supply Management Inventory System. The Central Supply catalog and the instructions for ordering supplies are located on the website http://npssurvey.nps.gov/pjr/login.asp. The current system for ordering and distribution of uniforms satisfies the requirements for uniform cap and shoulder patches. These items shall be supplied from the Central Supply System only for special uniforms used by the fire crews, nurses, ushers, search and rescue crews, etc. Requisitions for all badges (CS-1), shoulder patches (CS-7), and cap patches (CS-8), must contain a valid justification specifying why the items are needed, and must be certified by the Superintendent that the items shall be used in accordance with the uniform standards specified in NPS-43, Uniform Program Guideline. The Secretary's flag is no longer stocked at the Central Supply System. This item can be procured from: Annin Company 163 Bloomfield Ave. Verona, N.J. 07044 (201) 228-9400 Attention: DEL 36 CFR, Part II, Arrowhead and Parkscape Symbols, states the criteria governing the issuance of arrowhead patches or other items representing the arrowhead symbol, to the general public. Requisitioning offices shall provide adequate security for items such as badges, collar ornaments, license plates, etc., and ensure that Central Supply items are used only for official purposes. 7.15 -- Requisitioning Office Responsibilities (1) Ensure that items requested are justified and reflect only those items required for the operation of the park cluster or office. The hoarding of Central Supply items shall not be condoned. Regional/Center Property Managers shall monitor the issuance of supplies for possible system abuse. (2) Ensure that requisitions are accurately prepared and properly approved in accordance with this section. (3) Ensure that requests for uniform insignia are certified in accordance with this

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section. (4) Ensure that adequate security is provided to guard against theft, fraud, waste, and abuse. (5) Ensure that items obtained from the Central Supply activities are used for official purposes. (6) Offices shall continually work with Property Managers to ensure that the specifications of all Central Supply items remain current and are accurate to produce the required product. (7) Prepare and process Reports of Survey and Certificates of Unserviceable Property, as required, in accordance with IPMD 410 DM 114-60 and section 8 of this handbook. (8) Report all lost or stolen government identification badges, facility/office keys, access cards, key code numbers, vehicle access placards/decals, government license plates and/or government emergency vehicles immediately to the Department of the Interior 24-hour Watch Office at (202) 208-4108 or via e-mail at [email protected] When notifying the DOI Watch Office, include the circumstances of the loss or theft and unique identifiers of the lost or stolen government property. This notification will be in addition to the standard NPS policies and procedures related to lost or stolen government property.

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Section 8: Survey Procedures 8.0 -- Scope This section implements report of survey procedures outlined in IPMD 410 DM 114-60.800 and establishes the basic requirements for the appointment of Boards of Survey or other survey authorities to investigate circumstances surrounding lost, damaged, stolen, or destroyed and unserviceable property. It establishes requirements for investigations; to report findings and make determinations for the relief of accountability. It also prescribes personal financial liability for lost, stolen, damaged, or destroyed Government property, and review of survey actions. 8.1 -- Relief from Accountability Accountable Property Officers shall request relief of accountability for property loss, damage, theft, destruction, or unserviceable property by initiating a Report of Survey, Form DI 103 (Revised 6/88) or Certificate of Unserviceable Property, Form DI-103A (Revised 6/88). Accountable Property Officers shall ensure the accountability and control of the National Park Service's property resources. Managers at all levels are accountable for property under their control. They shall ensure that all employees are aware of their responsibilities and are held responsible for the proper use and care of Government-owned or leased property in their possession, and that all Government property is used only for official purposes. 8.2 -- Survey Action is not required (1) Survey action is not required to document the loss of non-expendable, non-sensitive property with an original acquisition cost of less than $5000. However, this does not alleviate the requirement to establish appropriate internal controls over all assets, regardless of cost. A DI-103 (Report of Survey) is still required to document the loss, theft, damage or destruction of Government property. The DI-103 must be submitted to the Accountable Property Officer for approval and final disposition. The DI-103 does not have to be approved by the Reviewing Authority. Any pattern of unacceptable losses of low value property should be referred to a survey authority. At the discretion of the Accountable Property Officer, he or she may appoint a Local Survey Officer when property irregularities exist. (2) Survey action is not required for damage to a motor vehicle when such damage is clearly not the result of employee negligence and there is no possibility of a claim against the Government, e.g., broken windshields from flying debris, minor dents while appropriately parked, damaged tires resulting from road hazards, etc. (3) Survey action is not required when a Certificate of Unserviceable Property is used in accordance with IPMD 410 DM 114-60-809. 8.3 -– Referral to Survey Authority Refer survey actions to a Survey authority for investigation, if the documentation or conditions indicate a pattern of unacceptable losses for low value property. The Accountable Property Officer or other authorized person may refer the incident, regardless of original acquisition

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cost to a Survey authority for investigation. 8.4 -- Survey Action Required (1) Survey action is required for relief from accountability for lost, stolen, damaged, or destroyed Government property, except as permitted in IPMD 410 114-60.801(a). Survey action is also required for all personal property above the $5000 accountability threshold, sensitive and museum property. (2) Surveys for loaned, shared or co-located equipment. Survey action responsibilities for property that is loaned, shared or co-located with other than Department of the Interior entities shall be clearly stated in the agreement authorizing the loan, sharing, or co-location use. 8.5 -- Types of Survey Authority When survey action is required, it shall be conducted by one of the following methods: A Standing Board of Survey, a Traveling Survey Officer, a Local Survey Officer, or a Special Board of Survey. Board members and Survey Officers must be Government employees. Contractor or other non-Government personnel may not be appointed although they may participate in an advisory capacity. Survey authorities are appointed, in writing, by the Accountable Property Officer. The Accountable Property Officer, Custodial Property Officer or employees responsible for the property to be surveyed shall not be Survey authorities. Regional/Center Property Managers may participate either as full members, or non-voting participants in an advisory capacity. Appointments will be for a period of at least one year and not more than three years. When there is a change in the Accountable Property Officer, i.e., transfer, retirement, death, existing appointments will remain in effect until a new Accountable Property Officer is appointed and must be renewed by the new permanent appointing official. 8.6 -- Standing Board of Survey A Standing Board of Survey shall consist of a chair person and no less than two members. All designations shall be in writing and made by the Accountable Property Officer. Members of the board of survey are held responsible for investigating the loss of Government property, completing reports of survey by documenting the investigation and arriving at findings and making determinations about the disposition of the property and financial liability for the loss. 8.7 -- Local Survey Officer A Local Survey Officer has the same responsibilities as a Standing Board of Survey, but can only be appointed to investigate loss of Government property with an original acquisition cost of less than the $15,000 capitalization threshold. 8.8 -- Traveling Survey Officer A Traveling Survey Officer has the same authorities, responsibilities, and restrictions as a

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Standing Board of Survey and acts in lieu thereof. A Traveling Survey Officer may be appointed in instances where the Accountable Property Officer is responsible for the property at separate geographic locations, and it has been determined that use of a Traveling Survey Officer is required. 8.9 -- Special Boards of Survey Property Administrators may establish Special Boards of Survey to investigate unusual losses such as those resulting from major incidents (e.g., fire, flood, earthquakes, etc.). Special Boards of Survey have the same responsibilities and authority as Standing Boards of Survey. No limits are imposed upon the membership or size of the Special Board. All members must be appointed in writing. 8.10 -- Report of Survey Forms Report of Survey Form DI-103 (6/88) and attachments deemed necessary shall be used to document the results of Survey investigations, findings, and determinations. 8.11 -- Distribution The original report of survey will be signed by the Survey Authority(s) and submitted through channels to the Reviewing Authority. If approved, the original report of survey will be used as authority to make adjustments to the property records. Report of Survey files must be retained for six years and then destroyed. 8.12 -- Additional Distribution Copies of approved reports of survey for property losses over $50,000 shall be forwarded to the Property Management Officer, WASO for submission to the Office of Acquisition and Property Management, Office of the Secretary. 8.13 -- Notification of a Board of Survey/Survey Officer When circumstances require convening a Survey authority, the Accountable Property Officer for the property to be surveyed will immediately notify the Board Chairperson or Survey Officer. Survey action shall be initiated within 30 days of the discovery of the loss. Delays shall be explained in writing and attached to the Survey document. 8.14 -– Survey Signature All members with survey authority involved in the decision of the Survey findings and determinations must sign the Report of Survey. 8.15 -– Board of Survey Activity Limitations Boards of Survey and Survey Officers will limit their activities to surveying Government property. Loss of private property, even though directly resulting from the actions of an employee, is not the concern of Boards of Survey or Survey Officers, but handled through the tort claims process.

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8.16 -– Continuing Surveyed Property in Service Survey authorities may recommend that the property be continued in service, reported for reutilization as available/excess property, or cannibalized for parts. 8.17 -– Witnessing Destruction or Reduction to Scrap Where approved Reports of Survey direct the destruction or reduction of property to scrap, such disposition must be witnessed by two individuals. The witnesses cannot be the Accountable/Custodial Property Officer or Cognizant Employee to whom the property is assigned. 8.18 -– Destruction and Disposal of Hazardous Materials Hazardous materials, including hazardous material containers and personal property containing hazardous materials shall be destroyed under Federal, State, and local waste disposal and air and water pollution control standards. Additional requirements for the abandonment and destruction of certain specific hazardous materials are contained in FPMR 101-42.1102. 8.19 -- Reviewing Authority for Reports of Survey The Reviewing Authority for Reports of Survey shall be a senior official, or designee at the next higher organizational level than that of the Accountable Property Officer at which the property was assigned. The Reviewing Authority must not be a member of the Board of Survey that acted in the case under consideration or the Accountable Property Officer of the property being surveyed. The Reviewing Authority can be the Superintendent, if the Accountable Property Officer’s responsibilities have been re-delegated to the Assistant/ Deputy Superintendent, Administrative Officer, Chief of Administration or other Management Official. 8.20 -- Authority to Overturn Findings and Determinations The Board of Survey or Survey Officer’s findings and determinations cannot be overturned by the Reviewing Authority or the Accountable Property Officer. The Reviewing Authority may only return a Report of Survey for reasons of technical insufficiency or inadequate documentation. If the Reviewing Authority disagrees with the Board of Survey's findings and determinations, he or she will prepare a written statement outlining reasons for such disagreement, and attach it to the report of survey. The Report of Survey shall be forwarded to the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO for resolution. 8.21 -- Removal of Surveyed Property from Accountability Records Surveyed property on reports of survey will not be removed from the property accountability records until the Reviewing Authority has approved the Report of Survey. Records for surveyed museum property are reconciled in accordance with the NPS Museum Property Handbook, Part II, Chapters 4 and 6. Property approved on Certificates of Unserviceable Property for destruction/reduction to

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scrap/cannibalism cannot be removed from the property records until the Certificate is approved by the Accountable Property Officer and destruction signed by the two witnesses. 8.22 -- Property Irregularities Property irregularities shall be investigated by Boards of Survey/Survey Officers. Examples of property irregularities include: (1) Loss of Government property in which the total is in excess of $10,000 either in the aggregate for a single incident or for a single item. (2) Repetitive losses of a particular type of property or recurring losses at a given location. (3) Losses of a suspicious nature. (4) Evidence of serious misconduct or irregularity (fraud, falsification of records, etc.). (5) Known, suspected, or alleged fraud, waste or abuse, or misappropriation of Government property. (6) Loss or theft of a firearm or weapon, ammunition, explosives, hazardous materials, or a controlled substance. 8.23 -- Reporting Theft, Unauthorized Use, or Vandalism to Law Enforcement Authorities All thefts, unauthorized use, and/or vandalism will be reported to the NPS law enforcement authorities at the respective park/unit. Where the park/unit has no law enforcement program, NPS law enforcement personnel at a neighboring site or support office should be notified, and a report must simultaneously be filed with the local or State law enforcement authorities, and where appropriate, to facility security forces (See IPMD 114-60.807-3 and IPMD 114-60.8071(c)(2)(i) for exceptions). Additionally, all thefts and vandalism will be reported to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The FBI may choose to conduct an active investigation only in cases where the value of the property stolen, missing, or vandalized is $5,000 or more. Reports for items valued at less than $5,000 will be placed in the FBI administrative files for further analysis, but normally no investigation will be conducted. 8.24 -- Investigation Requirement In addition to the general investigation requirements for survey action, 355 DM 2 requires additional investigation of property irregularities when the situation warrants. The provisions in the Departmental Manual pertaining to Office of Inspector General (OIG) investigations are in addition to Boards of Survey/Survey Officer requirements, and do not relieve Accountable Property Officers from ensuring that appropriate survey actions are conducted. 8.25 -- Board of Survey or Survey Officer Responsibilities If during the course of the investigation, evidence of property irregularities exists as outlined in IPMD 114-60.807-1 exists, Boards of Survey or Survey Officers shall refer the findings to the Accountable Property Officer. He or she shall review the findings to determine whether the

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case merits referral to the OIG. When it is determined that property irregularities exist, the initial findings and all of the pertinent documentation will be forwarded to the Assistant Inspector General for investigations. A copy of each case referred to the OIG will be provided with evidence of property irregularities to the Property Management Officer, WASO for review to determine whether the case merits referral to the OIG. When it is determined that property irregularities exist, the initial findings and all of the pertinent documentation shall be forwarded to the Assistant Inspector General for Investigations. A copy of each case referred to the OIG will also be provided to the Director, Office of Acquisition and Property Management (PAM) through the Property Management Officer, WASO for review. No further investigations or disciplinary actions shall be taken pending the outcome of the OIG review. The OIG will review all reports of survey, conduct investigations and provide the NPS Director and the Director, PAM with the results and recommendations. If investigations are not appropriate, the OIG will notify the reporting office and PAM. If notified, survey procedures may begin. 8.26 -- Employee Liability, Notification, and Appeal Employees will not be held financially liable for any loss attributable to inadequate instruction or inherent defects in the property. The loss of Government property alone does not automatically indicate negligence. If the Survey authority cannot prove negligence based on facts, or convincingly demonstrate in written argument that the employee acted in an imprudent manner, then it cannot arrive at a determination of negligence. Employees and Accountable Property Officers should be relieved of accountability and financial liability when they satisfactorily explain the circumstances surrounding the loss, the evidence is consistent with such explanation, and under the circumstances, the loss occurred despite reasonable care and precautions. Under circumstances other than those listed above, employees will be held financially liable when a thorough investigation determines: (1) That property loss was a result of use for other than official purposes; (2) That the property loss was due to simple or ordinary neglect or negligence, which is an act or omission of the employee in which he or she failed to exercise the degree of care, precaution, attention, and vigilance which a prudent person would exercise under like circumstances; (3) That property loss resulted from a supervisor or manager who failed to provide an employee with adequate instructions or authorized the use of property by an employee unfamiliar with its operation (in such cases, the supervisor or management official may be found negligent); or (4) That property loss was due to gross negligence, which is an act or omission which constitutes misconduct in accordance with 370 DM 752, or a wanton and reckless disregard for the property. (5) That the use of Government property by non-Government personnel was not authorized by a legal instrument such as a contract, cooperative agreement, etc., which contains the

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required property clauses. No survey action is required when such use of Government property is properly authorized. The determination of liability and amount due, if any, will be made by the Contracting Officer or other designated Government Representative for the contract, memorandum of understanding, cooperative agreement, etc. (6) That unauthorized use of Government property was made by non-Government personnel, which is illegal (see U.S.C. 641). If such use is permitted by a Government employee the action shall be considered a property irregularity and shall be reported to the OIG. Any other illegal use shall be reported to law enforcement authorities in accordance with IPMD 114-60.807-2. 8.27 -- Employee Notification and Participation Prior to convening a board of survey, the Chairperson, Board of Survey or Survey Officer will send written notification to the employee who may be held liable for property loss, and afford the employee the opportunity to present a written statement of facts surrounding the loss. Any such statement must be presented to the Board of Survey/Survey Officer by the employee within fourteen (14) calendar days of the date of the notification. The statement(s) will become a part of the Report of Survey and shall be considered in the investigation and determination of financial liability. The employee may also orally address the Board within the same time frame, but must provide an accompanying written statement of any facts he or she wishes the Board to include in the Report of Survey. 8.28 -- Financial Liability and Disciplinary Actions Any deliberation concerning an employee's liability must be completely separate and apart from, and without prejudice to or from, any personnel action that may be under consideration (e.g., admonishment, reprimand, suspension, reassignment, demotion, etc.). The assessment of financial liability is not to be used in lieu of, or as a form of, disciplinary action. Boards/Officers cannot recommend personnel actions, but shall confine their recommendations to recovering Government losses and correcting the cause of the incidents. 8.29 -- Determining the Amount of Financial Liability When the Board of Survey/Survey Officer finds that an employee should be held liable for property loss, the Board/Officer must determine and specify in writing the exact dollar amount. More than one employee may be found negligent for an incident involving a piece of property, but the dollar amount must be prorated equitably among the negligent employees, e.g., if two employees are equally to blame for a loss, then the total amount of the loss should be divided between them. The total amount of liability assessed should be determined as follows: (1) Simple negligence: The amount of financial liability assessed by the Board of Survey/Survey Officer in cases where property loss was the result of simple or ordinary negligence shall be: (a) Damage: The estimated or actual cost of repairs for damage to Government property, regardless of whether or not the property was repaired; or the replacement cost for a comparable item, whichever is less.

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(b) Loss or theft: The amount of financial liability for Government property which was lost or stolen as a result of simple negligence shall be the estimated or fair market value of the property computed by subtracting the accumulated depreciation from the acquisition value or the replacement cost of a comparable item; whichever is lowest. (c) Destruction: The amount of financial liability for Government property which was destroyed as a result of simple negligence shall be the estimated or fair market value of the property computed by subtracting the accumulated depreciation from the depreciable amount (See U.S. Department of the Interior " Instruction Manual for Conducting Survey Actions" for definitions); or the replacement cost of a comparable item; whichever is lowest. In no case involving simple negligence will the employee be assessed more than $250 or one month’s disposable pay, and always the lesser amount. Under no circumstances shall associated costs such as towing, storage, damage to private property, etc. be part of the liability assessed. (2) Gross negligence: When a Board of Survey/Survey Officer finds that an employee should be held liable for loss, theft, damage, or destruction of property, including vehicles and heavy equipment resulting from gross negligence, the amount of liability shall be determined as follows: (a) Damage: The amount of financial liability for damage resulting from gross negligence shall be the lower of the replacement cost of a comparable item or the estimated or actual cost of repairs, regardless of whether or not the property is repaired. (b) Loss or theft: The amount of financial liability for loss or theft of Government property resulting from gross negligence shall be the lower of the replacement cost of a comparable item or the estimated or fair market value of the property computed by subtracting the accumulated depreciation from the acquisition value. (c) Destruction: The amount of financial liability for destruction of Government property resulting from gross negligence shall be the lower of the replacement cost of a comparable item or the estimated or fair market value of the property computed by subtracting the accumulated depreciation from the depreciable amount. Under no circumstances shall associated costs such as towing, storage, damage to private property, etc. be part of the liability assessed. 8.30 -- Depreciation Formula for Lost, Damaged or Stolen Property Straight-line depreciation is the Departmental standard for depreciation. To determine the value of property at the time of its loss or damage do the following: (1) Determine the acquisition value (the fair market or estimated value at the time of receipt). (2)

Identify the salvage value (10% of the original acquisition value in line 1).

(3)

Subtract the salvage value from the acquisition value.

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(4)

Subtract the acquisition year from the current year and multiply the results by twelve.

(5)

Subtract the acquisition month from the current month.

(6)

Add or subtract the result from line 5 with line 4.

(7)

Multiply the result from line 3 by the result from line 6.

(8) Determine the useful life and subtract the acquisition year less the model year. Multiply the result by twelve. (9)

Divide the result from line 7 by the result from line 8.

(10) The result from line 9 is the accumulated depreciation for the item at the time of loss and is then subtracted from the acquisition value to determine the amount of financial liability. 8.31 -- Employee Notification of Findings and Determinations The Board of Survey Officer must provide the employee with the following information immediately following the completion of review and approval of a Survey action. A copy of the signed, reviewed, and approved reports of survey, including findings and recommendations, and a letter stating that if the employee chooses to appeal the findings and determinations of the Board of Survey/Survey Officer, he or she must file with the Director, Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA), (801 N. Quincy Street, MS 300-QC, Arlington, VA. 22203) a notice of appeal within 30 days of the date of the decision transmitted by the letter. A copy of the appeal letter must be forwarded to the Accountable Property Officer to ensure that billing procedures are not implemented before the appeal is decided. 8.32 -- Employee Appeal of Survey Findings and Determinations An employee may appeal a Board of Survey or Survey Officer finding of simple or gross negligence and/or financial liability. Appeal procedures are found in 43 CFR 4.700-4.704. Appeals are normally decided by an ad hoc board of appeals at the Department's Office of Hearings and Appeals. All findings by the ad hoc board of appeals are final for the Department in accordance with 43 CFR 4.1(b)(4). A copy of all appeals shall be sent by the appellant to the appropriate servicing property office, who will ensure that billing procedures are not inadvertently begun and will transmit the official file to the office of Hearings and Appeals. 8.33 -- Transmittal of the Official File Within 10 days of receipt of a copy of the notice of appeal, the official whose decision is being appealed shall ensure that the entire official file on the matter is transmitted to the Director, OHA (43 CFR 4.702). Photographic copies of photographs are not acceptable. The official file must be organized in a logical reverse chronological order and bound or stapled so that it will not become disorganized in the transmittal process.

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8.34 -- Debt Collection Amounts owed by the employee resulting from a survey action may be voluntarily remitted or collected by administrative offset in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3716 (1988). All monies collected due to determinations of negligence must be deposited in the general treasury. 8.35 -- Billing the Employee When it is determined by the Board of Survey/Survey Officer that an employee should be held financially liable, and that determination has been approved by the Reviewing Authority, the Government will establish its claim against the employee after the 30-day appeal period by billing for the amount determined by the Board of Survey/Survey Officer. Payment of such billing does not convey title to the property. Billing procedures will be suspended pending the outcome of a timely appeal. Billing will be reinstated if the Office of Hearings and Appeals finds in favor of the Government, or when the Director or an Appeals Board provides that a decision or any part of it shall be in full force and effect immediately (43 CFR 4.21). Because of the costs associated with the collection process, offices may elect not to collect small amounts in cases of simple negligence. If the amount is less than the estimated cost to effect the collection and does not exceed $100, the appropriate Finance Officer may waive it. All other requirements of IPMD 410, 114-60.8 remains in full force and effect. 8.36 -- Unserviceable Property This Subpart establishes the basic requirements for conducting unserviceable property actions. It establishes requirements for unserviceable property determinations, reporting findings, and making determinations for the relief of accountability. 8.37 -- Relief from Accountability for Unserviceable Property Accountable Property Officers shall request relief of accountability for unserviceable property through a Certificate of Unserviceable Property, form DI-103A (Revised 6/88). Unserviceable Property Forms are available on the NPS Property Management website www.nps.gov/propertymanagement. 8.38 -- Certificate of Unserviceable Property Signature Each Certificate of Unserviceable Property must be signed by the servicing property management staff and include their recommendation. 8.39 -- Certificate of Unserviceable Property Forms Certificate of Unserviceable Property Form DI-103A (6/88) shall be used for documenting the disposition of property that is obsolete or worn out through fair wear and tear. The Certificate of Unserviceable Property form may not be used for motor vehicles, firearms, or museum property. Motor vehicles and firearms shall be reported on a Report of Survey form DI-103. Board of survey procedures are applicable for vehicles and firearms which are lost, stolen, damaged, destroyed or unserviceable.

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8.40-- Conducting an Unserviceable Property Action Unserviceable property actions will be well documented, with care taken to obtain all the necessary signatures. After final approval, property records must be changed to reflect the destruction or rehabilitation of the property and documentation maintained six years for audit purposes and then destroyed. 8.41 -- Determination of Unserviceable Property The Cognizant Employee shall make a recommendation on a Certificate of Unserviceable Property Form DI-103A to the Custodial Property Officer as to whether the property is unserviceable or not. If the Custodial Property Officer concurs, he or she shall sign the Certificate and forward it to the Accountable Property Officer for review and signature. If the property is determined to be serviceable and is not needed, disposal procedures must be followed. If the property is unserviceable, this shall be annotated on the Certificate. 8.42 -- Continuing Unserviceable Property in Service Where it is found that property has further usefulness in its present condition, or after necessary cost-justifiable reconditioning, or has useable parts, Survey authorities may recommend that the property be continued in service, reported for reutilization as available excess property, or cannibalized for parts. 8.43 -- Witnessing Destruction or Reduction to Scrap Destruction, cannibalization, or reduction to scrap of all non-expendable property must be witnessed by an individual designated by the Accountable Property Officer. The witness may not be the Accountable or Custodial Property Officer, or the cognizant employee to whom the property is assigned. 8.44 -- Destruction and Disposal of Hazardous Materials Hazardous materials, including hazardous material containers and personal property containing hazardous materials shall be destroyed under Federal, State, and local waste disposal and air and water pollution control standards. Additional requirements for the abandonment and destruction of certain specific hazardous materials are contained in FPMR 101-42.1102. 8.45 -- Reviewing Authority for Certificates of Unserviceable Property The Reviewing Authority for Certificates of Unserviceable Property shall be the senior official, or designee, who is not directly responsible for the property. 8.46 -- Authority to Overturn Findings Determinations for Unserviceable Property The Reviewing Authority may disapprove a Certificate if supporting information is inadequate or incomplete. The Certificate will be returned to the originator through the property official outlining the reasons for disapproval and specifying what additional information is required. The revised Certificate and statements will be resubmitted by the originator through the property official within 30 days. Upon resubmission, the Reviewing Authority may make a final

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determination. 8.47 -- Removal of Unserviceable Property from Accountability Records Property approved for destruction/reduction to scrap/cannibalism will not be removed from the property records until all appropriate signatures are obtained and the recommended disposition has occurred.

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Section 9: Management of Firearms and Ammunition 9.0 -- Scope This section sets forth the policies and procedures for the accountability and control of firearms and ammunition within the NPS. Museum firearms are managed in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook, Parts I and II. This section shall not be construed to interfere with the application or enforcement of any existing law or regulation by Federal or other law enforcement organizations. There are five operational program areas that use firearms: (1) Visitor Protection (2) Natural Resource Management (3) Training (4) Interpretation (5) Cultural Resource Management The five operational areas which use firearms are required as appropriate, to comply with the standards outlined in DM 446, Law Enforcement; DO #9, Law Enforcement; DO #6, Interpretation and Visitor Services; Personal Property Management Handbook #44; and the NPS Museum Handbook, Parts I and II. In addition, Departmental guidance for museum property is provided in 411 DM 1-3, Museum Property Management. 9.1 -- Law Enforcement Firearms and Ammunition Acquisition of any law enforcement firearms and ammunition shall be approved in writing or electronically through the DOI Acquisition Software system (presently IDEAS) by the Senior Law Enforcement Official of a park unit, or the Law Enforcement Administrator, or the Chief, U.S. Park Police, as appropriate, per DM-446. The acquisition of law enforcement firearms and ammunition shall be limited to no more than the minimum necessary for an effective law enforcement program, which includes the protection of park visitors, property, and park resources. Law enforcement firearms may be acquired by several methods; i.e., purchase; transfer; donation; found during physical inventories; abandonment; forfeiture; lost and found. Firearms and ammunition may not be purchased with the Government-wide Purchase Card. Ammunition shall be purchased by a warranted contracting officer using a procurement document, as ammunition is considered a controlled property item. 9.2 -- Museum Collection Firearms and Ammunition Museum collection firearms and ammunition are managed in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook. Firearms and ammunition, acquired for museum exhibits and research purposes, are not intended for use as operational firearms. Acquisition of firearms for the museum collection must be in accordance with the park’s approved Scope of Collection Statement.

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The NPS standards for managing, use, and disposal of museum objects are outlined in the NPS Museum Handbook Parts I and II, and DO #28, Cultural Resources Management. 9.3 -- Accountability and Control of Firearms and Ammunition All firearms excluding museum firearms, regardless of cost will be recorded and accounted for in the Property Accountability System. Accountability, control, and responsibility for NPS firearms and ammunition must be maintained from the time of receipt throughout the disposal process. It is absolutely essential that each Accountable Officer establish procedures to ensure that necessary documentation is maintained to know exactly where each firearm is assigned and to whom it is assigned. Documentation must also be maintained to ensure reasonable accountability and control of ammunition. Museum firearms shall be documented in accordance with procedures outlined in the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II. They are documented in the Automated National Catalog System (ANCS). The Accountable Property Officer is responsible for: (1) Designating, in writing, the Custodial Property Officer; (2) Ensuring, that property records have been established for each firearm and that the records contain accurate data such as property numbers, serial numbers, descriptions, etc.; (3) Ensuring that the Firearms Custodial Officer(s) maintains accurate records on assignments and issues of firearms and ammunition; (3) Ensuring that physical inventories for firearms are conducted twice a year, prior to March 15th and Sept 30th and that those property records accurately reflect the firearms that are physically on hand, excluding museum firearms; (4) Ensuring that periodic inventories of ammunition are conducted to account for the use and distribution of the items; and (5) Ensuring that a physical inventory of firearms and ammunition is conducted and that all overages and/or shortages are reconciled prior to transfer of accountability to another Accountable Property Officer; The Firearms Custodial Officer must be a Commissioned Law Enforcement Officer. This individual will be responsible for assigning and controlling all firearms and ammunition acquired by the park or training center, except for inoperable firearms collected from archeological sites. The Firearms Custodial Officer is also responsible for issuing temporary replacements in parks that are authorized to retain an inventory of surplus firearms for such temporary replacement purposes (See DO #9, Firearms Acquisition). In addition to the reference above, the Firearms Custodial Officer is responsible for: (1) Ensuring that all firearms and ammunition are safeguarded at all times. (2) Maintaining a ledger and forwarding all DI-105 "Receipt for Property" or comparable forms

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of all firearms excluding museum firearms that are issued within each organization to the Accountable Property Officer. Ensuring that descriptions, serial numbers, and property numbers are accurately recorded on receipts for property. Museum firearms and ammunition must be documented in accordance with procedures outlined in the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II. (3) Verifying that semi/annual inventories are conducted for all firearms. Museum firearms are considered controlled property, and are inventoried annually; (4) Ensuring that all firearms are properly marked for identification, giving full consideration to their intended application, and that the property records reflect to whom each firearm is assigned or issued; (5) Continually screening firearms and ammunition to identify excess, and reporting excess to the Accountable Property Officer; (6) Reporting all lost, stolen, or damaged weapons/firearms or ammunition to the Accountable Property Officer immediately, stating the circumstances surrounding the incident in the Case Incident Reporting System; (7) Ensuring that firearms and ammunition are inspected in accordance with DO #9 Law Enforcement Policies and Directives, and the NPS Museum Handbook as appropriate, and recommend replacement when necessary; (8) Ensuring that firearms and ammunition are issued only to properly trained and qualified employees; (9) Maintaining a training record of all employees qualified to use firearms, as well as the type(s) of firearms in accordance with DO #9; (10) Ensuring proper security of firearms and ammunition, including those in museum collections while in storage or in the custody of individual employees; (11) Ensuring proper safety measures are taken concerning storage of ammunition, in accordance with applicable Occupational Safety Health Administration (OSHA); Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms (ATF); and NPS Regulations; (12) Processing personnel clearances for employees to ensure firearms and ammunition are turned in or properly accounted for prior to separation or transfer; (13) Ensuring that all employees who are authorized to use firearms have had background investigations in accordance with the requirements of DM 446 and DO #9; and (14) Ensuring that all acquired firearms are certified as to the safety of the firearm for use, storage, or display. The Firearms Receiving Officer is responsible for: (1) Receipt of all firearms and conducting the initial test firing and inspection;

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(2) Accountability of all firearms until the weapon is physically turned over to the Senior Law Enforcement Official of the receiving park/unit or office; (3) Physically counting incoming firearms to ensure that the quantity ordered has been delivered, and that the property received meets specifications; (4) Ensuring that the appropriate property data entry person receives supporting documentation to account for the firearms and update the Property Accountability System; (5) Ensuring that firearms received which require additional technical identification or inspection, are examined and certified by the Senior Law Enforcement Official who must certify that all firearms are safe for use, storage, or display, and if needed, securing inspection by other qualified personnel; (6) Noting all defects or damages at the time of inspection, and conducting test-firing and other inspections, as appropriate; and (7) Ensuring physical security of firearms and shipping the firearms and packing slip to the respective region/center or park/unit. All firearms shall be shipped UPS, Federal Express, or U.S. Postal Service, return receipt requested. 9.4 -- Centralized Receiving Point for Firearms Issued by the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) The NPS Central Firearms Cache Coordinator at Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) is the Firearms Receiving Officer for all firearms excluding museum firearms purchased for the Training Center. These firearms are shipped directly to FLETC from the manufacturer. FLETC is responsible for inspecting, test firing, and accountability and control of these firearms. Firearms purchased by FLETC will be issued permanently to Park Rangers upon completion of the Law Enforcement Training Course and maintained on the FLETC inventory. FLETC will also ensure that these firearms are entered into the Property Accountability System. FLETC must ensure that parks provide them with an inventory of all weapons personally assigned to permanent commissioned employees twice a year. This can be accomplished with the submission of each of the parks semi-annual firearms qualification logs reflecting each individual commission employee with the following information: - Name of park - Barcode number (property number) assigned to the weapon - Type, serial number of weapon(s) used to qualify - Rating (pass/fail) - Name of instructor(s) - Name of armorer(s)

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This information will be filed in the employee’s commission files and maintained at the FLETC. An original DI-105 “Receipt for Property Form” will be submitted upon issuance of the weapon and maintained in the rangers commission file. 9.5 -- Acquisition of Firearms All firearms purchased for use and maintenance at a particular park will be entered into the Property Accountability System by the Park Property Manager and maintained on the park inventory. If the park issues a firearm to a commissioned employee for use at the park while the employee is permanently assigned there, but requires that the employee turn in the firearm upon reassignment, the firearm will remain on the park inventory. If a park purchases a preferred firearm for a ranger, Sig Sauer 40 or 45 caliber, to replace their issued 9mm, then the firearm will be placed on the FLETC inventory and the 9mm will be returned to FLETC. Firearms issued to Commissioned Law Enforcement Officers by FLETC, who move from park to park, will also remain on the FLETC inventory. 9.6 -- Purchase of New and/or Replacement Firearms If new or replacement firearms are purchased by a park/unit or training center, the Firearms Custodial Officer must ensure that a copy of the purchase order is provided to the Central Firearms Cache Coordinator at FLETC (Firearm Receiving Officer). In a case where the region/center or park/unit ordered the firearm(s), they are responsible for ensuring that the receiving report is forwarded to the Finance Office for payment. The Firearm Custodial Officer is responsible for the issuance of seasonal employees’ firearms and for accountability, control and storage of the firearms. 9.7 -- Marking and Identification of Firearms When placing orders for firearms, the NPS no longer engraves property numbers on firearms. Parks are responsible for assigning the barcode label (property number) to the firearm(s). The barcode label number must be entered into the Property Accountability System. However, the barcode label is not affixed to the firearm. It will be maintained in the park property files along with the purchase order and receipt documentation. 9.8 -- Shipment/Inspection of Firearms When a park/unit orders firearms, they will no longer be shipped to the FLETC for inspection and test firing, but are required to notify FLETC, prior to purchase of any firearms. This will eliminate the need to purchase firearms that the FLETC may already have in stock. Firearms purchased by parks will be shipped directly to the park from the vendor. It will be the responsibility of the park to have these weapons inspected and test fired by a certified NPS armorer, before the firearms are issued to park staff. The FLETC will generally only inspect and test fire firearms that they purchase. If there are no armorers available at the park, the firearms maybe sent to the FLETC armorer by making special arrangements or to another park with an NPS armorer. The FLETC will be responsible for maintaining an up-to-date list of armorers certified by them and other sources.

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9.9 -- Inventories of Firearms and Ammunition A physical inventory of all firearms will be conducted twice a year, prior to March 15th and September 30th of each calendar year. The inventory will consist of the verification of serial/property numbers and location of the firearm. Museum firearms will be inventoried in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II, of Section 4. Missing firearms will be processed in accordance with this section. Firearms discovered as a result of a physical inventory and not previously recorded on the property records will also be processed in accordance with this section. Physical inventories of ammunition and black powder will be conducted annually or more often if deemed necessary. The inventories must consist of (1) a physical count to the nearest case or box of ammunition (2) a determination if sufficient stock is maintained (3) an inspection to ensure that the ammunition meets required safety standards and (4) an assessment of the security system. Firearms Custodial Officers shall ensure that the results of the physical inventory are reconciled with the log maintained to record issues and receipts. Any differences in between the physical inventories and the log must be reconciled within five days of the inventory date. 9.10 -- Special Inventories of Firearms and Ammunition Special physical inventories of firearms and ammunition must be conducted when there is a change of the Firearms Custodial Officer. Special inventories of firearms may be necessary as the result of audits or when other circumstances arise requiring an inventory. 9.11 -- Use of Non-Government-owned Firearms If a commissioned employee purchases a firearm and wants to carry it as an approved duty firearm, that firearm will not be added to the park inventory. Use of non-government-owned property for official use must meet the guidelines in this handbook, Section 2.2 and RM9, Chapter 6-2, 3.10.5. In addition, there must be a written agreement between the employee and his or her supervisor. The employee will be issued an NPS firearm, upon request. 9.12 -- Exchange of Firearms Issued by FLETC If a commissioned employee wishes to exchange his or her issued firearm for a different authorized Sig-Sauer firearm (RM9, Chapter 6-2, 3.10.1), he or she must notify the NPS Firearms Program Manager at the FLETC. If the preferred weapon is or becomes available it will be issued to the employee by FLETC and remain on the FLETC inventory. The original firearm issued will be returned to the FLETC cache for re-issuance. 9.13 -- Issuance of Firearms to Seasonal Commissioned Employees Parks may maintain a cache of firearms for issuance to seasonal commissioned employees or for temporary replacement. These cache firearms will be maintained on the park inventory. However, when a Park Ranger transfers to another region/center or park/unit, he or she will keep the same firearm.

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9.14 -- Advising the Accountable Property Officer of Transfers The Firearms Custodial Officer is responsible for advising the Accountable Property Officer/property data entry person that the firearm is being transferred in custody of the Ranger to the new duty station. The losing Accountable Property Officer/property data entry person will prepare the Transfer of Property document (DI-104) and forward it to the Receiving park/unit. It is the responsibility of the receiving park/unit property data entry person to update the information in the Property Accountability System. 9.15 -- Separation of Law Enforcement Personnel from the Service or Position All commissioned employees that are permanently leaving the service or their law enforcement position must return their assigned firearm and law enforcement credentials to the park's Chief Ranger or Superintendent. The Chief Ranger or Superintendent must send the firearms to the FLETC within 5 days upon receipt. A completed DI-104 "Transfer of Property Form" must be shipped along with the firearm to the FLETC. Authorized shipping procedures must be followed, using UPS, Federal Express and/or a similar service. The exterior labeling on the package must not contain any indication of shipment of firearms. The cost of packaging, shipping, and handling will be the responsibility of the park. The firearm(s) should be shipped to: National Park Service Federal Law Enforcement Training Center Building 64, Room 220 GLYNCO, GA 31524 9.16 -- Issuance of Firearms and Ammunition Firearms and ammunition must be strictly controlled to ensure that issuance is only to authorized employees and that the location of the item(s) is readily identifiable. Firearms must be issued on a Receipt for Property (DI-105) or other comparable forms. Receipts for property must contain, as a minimum, a brief description of the firearm, property number, serial number, quantity issued, date, and the name of the individual who issued the firearm, location and the signature of the employee receiving the firearm. Any annotations on the hand receipt or receipt for property which change any of the above information shall be written in ink, initialed, and dated. Issues of ammunition shall be recorded in a log maintained by the Firearms Custodial Officer. Control of museum firearms is governed by procedures in the NPS Museum Handbook. 9.17 -- Security and Storage of Firearms and Ammunition The NPS's physical security program regarding firearms and compatible ammunition is directed at anticipating, recognizing, and appraising the vulnerability by setting strict procedures regarding storage containers and facilities, issuance, and accountability requirements. The Firearms Custodial Officer is responsible for the physical security of all firearms and ammunition within his or her area of responsibility. Firearms and ammunition are to be secured and stored separately. For other security and storage requirements, see DO #9, Law Enforcement policies. Museum firearms shall be secured and stored in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook, Part I, Chapters 7 and 9.

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9.18 -- Utilization and Disposal of Excess Firearms and Ammunition In accordance with 41 CFR Parts 101-42, excess firearms that are no longer required for the needs and the discharge of the responsibilities of the NPS may be destroyed or transferred to other Federal agencies authorized to carry firearms for official use. With the revision of the FPMR, surplus firearm(s) assigned a disposal code of 1 or 4 may be transferred to State and Local Law Enforcement activities under the Federal Donation Program. Only law enforcement entities whose primary function is the enforcement of applicable Federal, State, and/or local laws may receive donated surplus firearm(s) and the firearm(s) may only be issued to those compensated law enforcement officers having powers to apprehend and to arrest. Seized, forfeited and abandoned property is excluded from the donation program unless those firearms are converted for official use. All firearm(s) that are declared excess by the NPS must be reported to the General Services Administration (GSA) if assigned a disposal code of 1 or 4. All other excess firearms with a disposal code of 7, X or S are considered non-reportable and shall be destroyed at the National Park Service (NPS) Firearms Disposition Center (FDC) located in Springfield, MA. They may be destroyed without public notice. All NPS museum firearms are subject to the procedures in the NPS Museum Handbook. U.S. Park Police firearms categorized as seized or abandoned are subject to the procedures in 41CFR 101-48, Utilization, Donation, or Disposal of Abandoned and Forfeited Personal Property. The following instructions shall be followed as they relate to the donation and destruction of firearm(s). Donation of Firearm(s): Only handguns, rifles, shotguns, and individual light automatic weapons, all less than .50 caliber in FSC 1005, and rifle and shoulder fired grenade launchers in FSC 1010, assigned a disposal condition code of 1 or 4, may be offered by GSA to State agencies for donation to eligible Law Enforcement entities for law enforcement purposes. Parks/units must report the above referenced firearms to GSA regardless of unit cost when assigned a disposal condition code of 1 or 4. Firearm ammunition may not be donated. 9.19 -- Disposal Condition Codes 1 ---- Property which is in new condition or unused condition and can be used immediately without modifications or repairs. 4 ---- Property which shows some wear, but can be used without significant repair. 7 ---- Property which is unusable in its current condition but can be economically repaired. X ---- Property which has value in excess of its basic material content, but repair or rehabilitation is impractical and/or uneconomical. S ---- Property which has no value except for its basic material content. 9.20 -- Screening of Available Excess Firearms All firearms with a disposal code of 1 or 4 must be submitted for screening on a Report of Excess Personal Property (SF 120), and if applicable, the Continuation Sheet (SF 120A). The

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Park must forward the original and three copies of the SF 120 Form to the: NPS-FDC Springfield Armory National Historic Site, One Armory Square, Springfield, MA. 01105-1299 The SF 120 must include the correct serial number, nomenclature, and condition code for the firearm(s) being reported. It is imperative that the person assigning the disposal condition code be knowledgeable enough about the firearm when making the determination. The firearms are not to be sent along with the SF 120 to the Springfield Armory. The park/unit is responsible for securing the firearms while awaiting disposition instructions. The FDC will determine whether or not the firearms listed on the SF 120 will be accessioned into the Springfield Armory National Historic Site museum collection. If a known need exists within another bureau or office within the Department of the Interior, special authorization may be granted by the Property Management Officer to transfer firearms to another bureau. It is the responsibility of both the losing and gaining activity to ensure that the physical transfer of firearms, as well as the transfer of accountability, occurs with no delay and that accountability records of both the gaining bureau and NPS reflect matching information as to dates of transfer, recipient, and location to which the firearm is transferred. 9.21 -- Donation of Firearms to other Law Enforcement Entities Prior to donation, when applicable, the park/unit must remove or scratch off the NPS Property number from all old firearm(s). In order to eliminate the problem of removing the numbers that are engraved on firearms, the NPS no longer engrave property numbers on firearms. After the screening process, if the FDC determines that the firearms will not be accessioned, the FDC will be responsible for notifying the park/unit and ensuring that the firearms are circularized for reutilization by another bureau or office within the Department of the Interior (DOI). The FDC is responsible for submitting the park/unit’s SF120 electronically or manually to the General Services Administration (7FP-8), Denver, CO. 80225-0506 to report available excess property. GSA makes the final decision for all firearm donations. After the donation has been approved, the GSA will forward a completed SF 123 Transfer Order Surplus Property Form to the park/unit. The SF 123 Form will indicate the name and address of the donee and GSA disposition instructions. Park/units will be responsible for disposing of the firearm(s) in the Property Accountability System. All firearms must be shipped or transported directly from the park/unit to the donee. The donee is responsible for all shipment and pick-up costs. If the FDC determines that there are firearms listed on the SF 120 that will be accessioned, they will cross that firearm(s) off the list and request a completed DI-104 Transfer of Property form and the shipment of the firearm from the park/unit. 9.22 -- Disposal/Destruction of Firearms All NPS firearms excluding museum firearms that have a disposal code of 7, X, or S must continue to be submitted to the FDC on the DI-104 Transfer of Property Form for final disposition. Individual NPS units are not authorized to destroy any firearms locally. A Transfer of Property Form (DI-104) signed by the Accountable Property Officer and the Senior Law Enforcement Official of the park/unit must be pre-approved by the Springfield Armory, prior to shipping firearms for destruction. Park/units will no longer initiate transfers within the Property Accountability System for firearm(s) sent to the Springfield Armory for destruction.

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The Armory will initiate and accept all transfers in the Property Accountability System. Contact the Springfield Armory to obtain a copy of the instructions for processing the DI-104. The Center is responsible for preparation of the report of survey and establishing the Board of Survey in accordance with Section 8 of this handbook and establishing a contract with the appropriate vendor for destruction of the firearms in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. In addition, the Center will maintain a file copy of the report of survey and the transfer of property document for audit purposes. The Center will maintain a document register or log of all reports of survey or transfer of property documents. The losing Accountable Officer will be relieved of his or her responsibility for the firearms, once the Center signs the DI-104, transfer the item in the Property Accountability System and returns the DI-104 to the losing Accountable Property Officer. The Center must comply with the procedures outlined in this section, the Federal Property Management Regulation 41 CFR 101-45.902-2 and DO #9 when reducing firearms to scrap by crushing, cutting, breaking, or deforming. 9.23 -- Disposal of Ammunition Ammunition except museum ammunition is consumed through use. There is no life expectancy on ammunition. The brass casings may be traded in toward new ammunition. This requirement has been determined to be the most effective way to reduce loss of accountability for this particularly sensitive category of property. 9.24 -- Shipping and Packaging Instructions for Firearms Packaging should not contain any indications of firearms or ammunition on the outside. Costs of packaging, shipping, and handling will be charged to the account of the park/unit transferring the firearm(s). Once received, all subsequent costs will be borne by the FDC. All NPS firearms excluding museum and U.S. Park Police seized firearms will be destroyed at the NPS Firearms Disposition Center located in Springfield, MA. A transfer of property form (DI104), signed by the Accountable Officer and the Senior Law Enforcement Official of the park/unit must be pre-approved by Springfield Armory, prior to shipping firearms for destruction. Contact the Springfield Armory to obtain a copy of the instructions for processing the DI-104. Note: All firearms must be shipped via UPS, Federal Express or U.S. Postal Service with a "return receipt requested" to: NPS F.D.C. Springfield Armory NHS Attn: Superintendent One Armory Square Springfield, MA. 01105-1299 The Center will sign the original copy of the DI-104 accepting full responsibility for the firearms and return it to the Accountable Property Officer. Questions regarding the transfer and/or shipping of firearms to the Center should be directed to the Superintendent via cc: mail (SPARSuperintendent), telephone at (413) 734-6477, or Fax at (413) 747-8062. Museum firearms in

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excess to the purpose of a museum collection shall be processed in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II, Chapter 6, Deaccessioning. 9.25 -- Sale of Firearms/Weapons Under no circumstances will firearms be made available for sale, except as scrap through the General Services Administration on form SF 126, Report of Personal Property for Sale. Firearms are not eligible for sale or trade in (exchange) using the exchange/sale procedures outlined in 41 CFR 101-46. Museum firearms that are eligible for exchange or transfers are subject to procedures outlined in the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II, chapter 6, Deaccessioning. 9.26 -- Reporting Firearms as Lost or Stolen Any contemporary service firearms not used in undercover operations or which are housed as part of a museum collection that does not contain a serial number must be immediately documented on a Report of Survey and scrapped. Lost or stolen firearms will be immediately reported to the Firearms Custodial Officer, who, in turn, will immediately report such loss or theft to the Accountable Officer and the Senior Law Enforcement Official. Additionally, the Firearms Custodial Officer must notify the Firearms Receiving Officer at FLETC immediately if the firearm is on FLETC’s inventory. Every effort should be made to locate the firearm immediately. If all attempts to locate the firearm fail, the incident must be reported to the NPS law enforcement authorities at the respective park/unit, or where the park/unit has no law enforcement program, to the local or State law enforcement authorities, and where appropriate, to facility security forces. Additionally, all thefts must be entered into NCIC. Board of Survey action will be initiated in accordance with IPMD 410 DM 114-60. 9.27 -- Abandoned, Forfeited or Destroyed Firearms Firearms abandoned on NPS property, or forfeited as a result of legal action will be processed in accordance with 41 CFR 101-48. Under no circumstances will firearms be returned to a finder. Firearms and ammunition except museum firearms will be returned to the owner only after all Federal, State, and NPS law enforcement requirements have been met.

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Section 10: Utilization and Disposal of Hazardous Materials and Personal Property 10.0 -- Scope This section prescribes the Departmental and GSA policies and procedures governing the utilization, donation, sale, and exchange for hazardous materials, or other categories of property with special utilization and disposal requirements. 10.1 -- Hazardous Materials Hazardous material means property that is deemed a hazardous material, hazardous waste, or hazardous substance under the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act (HMTA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) or the Toxic Substances Control Act. (TSCA). Characteristics of hazardous materials are listed in FPMR 101-42.001. See the NPS Hazardous Waste Management Handbook for comprehensive guidance on these matters. 10.2 -- Identification/Inventory of Hazardous Materials Current acquisition standards and the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) require that manufacturers identify and document potential hazards on Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as part of the acquisition process. The manufacturer or distributor is responsible for ensuring that hazardous materials are properly labeled, marked, or tagged in accordance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements regarding the actual or potential hazard associated with the handling, storage, or use of the item to include hazardous chemicals contained and the name of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or responsible party. When an item has been determined as hazardous, the Superintendent will create a hazardous material inventory record, or document the appropriate existing inventory record, accordingly. Information will be maintained in the item record for use in preparation of necessary reports of excess property, reassignment/transfer documentation, and other documentation requirements that may arise. Such documentation shall be maintained from the time of receipt of the hazardous material until consumption, transfer, or disposal. 10.3 -- Reporting Requirements A certification by the Superintendent or designated management official that the item has been clearly labeled as prescribed in FPMR 101-42.202(e) must be included in the description of the hazard. He or she shall also certify that the containers and/or packaging meet or exceed Department of Transportation specifications for a hazardous material container (49 CFR parts 178-180). It is the responsibility of the Superintendent or designated management official to ensure that the provisions of FPMR 101-42.204-206 are complied with. 10.4 -- Transfer of Hazardous Materials Excess hazardous materials may be transferred among Federal agencies under FPMR 101-43. 309-5, except that the Standard Form (SF) 122, Transfer Order Excess Personal Property, or any

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other transfer order form approved by the General Services Administration (GSA) must contain a complete description of the actual or potential hazard associated with the handling, storage, or use of the item. The description must also consist of a written narrative, complying with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200, in block 13c or as an addendum. Hazardous waste management and disposal is strictly regulated at 40 CFR 260-272. Under these regulations, disposal of hazardous wastes shall be accompanied by a waste manifest. 10.5 -- Donation of Hazardous Materials Surplus personal property identified as hazardous material not required for transfer as excess personal property to Federal agencies will normally be made available for donation. However, State agencies will not acquire hazardous materials without first ensuring that there are eligible known donees for such property. Surplus property identified as hazardous may be donated provided the donee: (1) Is informed that the item is hazardous and furnished special handling and/or other appropriate information; and (2) Signs the certifications in accordance with FPMR 101-42.301. Superintendents or designated management officials are responsible for the identification and reporting of hazardous materials as set forth in FPMR 101-42.202 and 101-42.203. Pending transfer for donation, the holding agency will be responsible for performing, the cost of, and care and handling of its hazardous materials. Special donation requirements for specific hazardous materials are provided in FPMR 101-42.1102. 10.6 -- Reporting Hazardous Materials for Sale The NPS will report hazardous materials to be sold by GSA to the appropriate GSA regional office for the region in which the property is physically located in the manner outlined in FPMR 101-42.402. 10.7 -- Transportation of Hazardous Materials The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials regulations (49 CFR parts 170-180) issued by the Department of Transportation. The Superintendent or designated management official, prior to shipping hazardous materials, will certify on the shipping document, based on his or her own examination, that the materials are properly classified, described, packaged, marked, and labeled and are in accordance with the hazardous materials regulations and FPMR 101-42.405. 10.8 -- Special Types of Hazardous Materials Hazardous material identification is required for all material which, by virtue of its potentially dangerous nature, requires controls to assure adequate safety to life, property, and the environment, and which is therefore defined as a hazardous material. Federal Supply Classification (FSC) groups and classes which contain hazardous materials are as follows: (1) 6810 Chemicals

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(2) 6820 Dyes (3) 6830 Gases: Compressed and liquefied (4) 6840 Pest control agents and disinfectants (5) 6850 miscellaneous chemical specialties (6) 7930 Cleaning and polishing compounds and preparations (7) 8010 Paints, dopes, varnishes, and related products (8) 8030 Preservative and sealing compounds (9) 8040 Adhesives (10) 9110 Fuels, solid (11) 9130 Liquid propellants and fuels, petroleum case (12) 9140 Fuel oils (13) 9150 Oils and greases: Cutting, lubricating, and hydraulic (14) 9160 miscellaneous waxes, oils, and fats If an item is determined to be hazardous as defined in FPMR 101-42.001, a material safety data sheet (or equivalent) must accompany the item even though the FSC is not listed above. 10.9 -- Special Requirements for Utilization, Donation, Sale, and Abandonment or Destruction of Hazardous Materials (1) Asbestos (See FPMR 101-42.1102-1) (2) Polychlorinated biphenyl (See FPMR 101-42.1102-2) (3) Controlled substances (See FPMR 101-42.1102-3) Destruction of controlled substances will be performed by a Board of Survey, unless the special agent in charge (SAC) of the Drug Enforcement Administration Divisional Office directs otherwise. The Board of Survey process etc. is limited to destruction of those substances coming from NPS inventories and not from evidence. DO #9 spells out the procedures for destruction of controlled substances coming out of evidence, and the survey process would not be appropriate. (4) Drugs, biologicals, and reagents other than controlled substances (See FPMR 101-42.11025).

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(5) The destruction contemplated will be performed by the Board of Survey. 10.10 -- Personal Property The first source of supply is excess personal property, which will be used by the NPS to the fullest extent practicable as prescribed in FPMR 101-43.3. 10.11 -- Property Utilization Reviews Accountable Property Officers will ensure that all excess personal property under their jurisdiction is made available for transfer, prior to disposal. They will periodically review and evaluate stores and equipment utilization reports to identify idle or unneeded property. 10.12 -- Reassignment of Personal Property Accountable Property Officers shall direct property data entry persons to screen all available personal property against the needs of the Service and other bureaus within the Department of the Interior (DOI) before determining that the property is excess. 10.13 -- Screening Non-reportable Available Property Non-reportable available property will not be routinely circularized except in those instances where there is reason to believe there may be general interest in the property. 10.14 -- Screening Reportable Available Property Reportable available personal property will be circularized to other DOI offices within a reasonable transport distance unless its nature, condition, or location virtually precludes economical utilization by such offices. Available personal property listings will also be transmitted to other Interior offices in accordance with listings provided by the Office of Acquisition and Property Management (PAM). Property not utilized by other Interior activities will then be determined to be excess to the NPS and DOI. Electronic screening is encouraged. 10.15 -- Reporting Requirements Excess personal property must be reported promptly to GSA in accordance with the FSC descriptions in sufficient detail to permit transfer or sale without further reference to the holding agency as prescribed in FPMR 101-43.304-1. The following types of equipment must be reported as indicated below: (1) Available Automated Data Processing (ADP) equipment shall be reported in accordance with 376 DM 5. (2) Available aircraft shall be referred to the Office of Aircraft Services. 10.16 -- Forms and Distribution of Reports Reports of excess property must be made on Standard Form (SF) 120, Report of Excess Personal Property, and SF 120A, Continuation Sheet (Report of Excess Personal Property), or by

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automatic data processing media in accordance with FPMR 101-43.304-2 10.17 -- Property Not Required to Be Formally Reported Excess property which is not required to be formally reported to GSA will be reported to the appropriate Consolidated Administrative Support Unit (CASU) or GSA regional office for donation or sale in accordance with FPMR 101-43.305; unless such reporting is uneconomical. All types of books, periodicals, other publications and related material shall be disposed of in the same manner as excess scrap materials. 10.18 -- Items Requiring Special Handling (1) Gifts and decorations received from foreign Governments or foreign individuals must be reported annually. (2) Gifts given to foreign Governments or foreign individuals must be reported annually. 10.19 -- Transfers of Excess Property Transfers of excess personal property may be made among Federal agencies (including their cost-reimbursement contractors, cooperatives, and project grantees), the Senate, the House of Representatives, the Architect of the Capitol and any activities under his direction, mixedownership government corporations as defined in 31 U.S.C. 9101, the municipal government of the District of Columbia, or non-Federal agencies for which GSA procures. Superintendents or designated management officials may approve the transfer of excess personal property to and from other Federal agencies, but must comply with FPMR 101-43.309. 10.20 -- Reimbursement Transfers of available property within the DOI will be without exchange of funds, except when: (1) The disposing park/unit or office may elect to receive reimbursement at the fair market value where the property involved is reimbursable by law. (2) The receiving park/unit or office will pay the fair market value in all instances where the property being acquired shall be carried in accounts, disposals from which are reimbursable. (3) Transfers of contractor inventory within the DOI will be without exchange of funds where any proceeds would be for deposit in miscellaneous receipts. Where the proceeds would be deposited otherwise, the extent of reimbursement shall be determined by the disposing office, but shall not exceed the estimated fair market value. 10.21 -- Procedures for Effecting Transfers All transfers of excess personal property between Federal agencies will be in accordance with FPMR 101-43.309-5 and by SF 122, Transfer Order Excess Personal Property or any other automated transfer of property form approved by GSA. Accountable Property Officers shall approve the transfer of excess personal property to another Federal Agency.

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10.22 -- Costs of Care and Handling The acquiring office will not be billed for direct costs of transfers between DOI activities unless such costs are in excess of $100.00, and then only when the regional or finance office of the holding activity determines that reimbursement is necessary. 10.23 -- Use of Excess Personal Property on Cost-reimbursement Contracts (1) When excess personal property is acquired and made available for use on costreimbursement type contracts title remains vested in the Government unless statutory authority permits otherwise. (2) Parks/units and offices are responsible for determining the use of excess personal property in their cost-reimbursement type contracts and for establishing a system of accountability for such property, and for ultimate reassignment or disposition of the property. (See FAR 48 CFR 45 for required procedures.) 10.24 -- Gifts and Decorations Received from Foreign Governments or Foreign Individuals Section 515 of Public Law 95-105 requires submission of an annual report on gifts and decorations received from foreign governments or foreign individuals which should be submitted to the Property Management Officer, WASO by December 31 of each year for consolidation and submission to PAM by January 31. 10.25 -- Gifts Given to Foreign Governments or Foreign Individuals Section 515(k) of Public Law 95-105 prohibits giving any gift of more than minimal value, purchased with appropriated funds, to foreign individuals without first obtaining Congressional approval. An annual report shall be submitted to the Property Management Officer, WASO by October 1 of each year containing details on: (1) any gifts of more than minimal value purchased with appropriated funds, which were given to foreign individuals during the previous year, and; (2) any other gifts of more than minimal value given by the United States Government to a foreign individual which were not obtained using appropriated funds. The current report format and current definition of “minimal value” can be obtained from the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO. 10.26 -- Donation of Personal Property All donations of aircraft, including individual aircraft components, accessories, parts, or appurtenances not attached to or an integral part of an aircraft shall be accomplished by, or with the knowledge and assistance of the Office of Aircraft Services (See FMR 102-33.335). FMR 102-37 prescribes the policies and methods governing the disposition by executive agencies by donation to public bodies of personal property which has no commercial value or of which the estimated cost of continued care and handling would exceed the estimated proceeds from its sale. This section does not apply to surplus personal property donated for the purposes of FMR subparts 101-37.130, 101-37.375, and 101-37.520; or controlled substances and combat material. Museum property is disposed of in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II, Chapter 6, Deaccessioning.

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10.27 -- Reviewing Authority When a line item of the property to be disposed of at any one location at any one time had an original cost (estimated if not known) of more than $1,000, findings made under FMR 10237.560 must be approved by the designated Reviewing Authority prior to disposal of the property. 10.28 -- Reports (1) The Annual Report of the Donation of Surplus Personal Property is no longer required. (2) The Annual Report of the Donation of Foreign Excess Property is no longer required. 10.29 -- Direct Donation of Excess and Surplus Personal Property This paragraph pertains to the donation of excess and surplus educational and scientific personal property to educational institutions. It includes procedures for donation under the Stevenson-Wylder Technology Innovation Act of 1980, as amended (15 U.S.C. 3710 (I), Executive Order 12999, dated April 17, 1996). In accordance with Executive Order 12999, Federal agencies will give special consideration for computer donations to schools and educational nonprofits in Federal empowerment zones and enterprise communities. Empowerment zones and enterprise communities were designed to create self-sustaining, long-term economic development in areas of pervasive poverty and unemployment. Schools and educational nonprofits will have to indicate whether they are located within an empowerment zone or enterprise community when they register for the program. Therefore, in order to provide modern computers to classrooms, Executive Order 12999 encourages Federal agencies to transfer their excess computer equipment directly to public, private, parochial, or home schools serving pre-kindergarten through the 12th grade and other nonprofit educational organizations. An educational nonprofit organization is eligible if it is classified as tax-exempt under section 501(c) of the tax code and serves pre-kindergarten through the 12th grade. Contact your GSA regional point of contact or access the Computers for Learning Program on the website to ensure that the nonprofit organization is eligible to receive the donation. GSA determines the eligibility of the nonprofit organizations to participate in the program. The Executive Order also encourages Federal employees to volunteer time and resources, to the extent permitted by law, to help with computer transport, maintenance, training, and technical assistance. Prior to donating equipment to schools and nonprofit organizations, a written agreement with the prospective donee must be established, stating its aims. An example of the agreement is as follows: Written Agreement with Donee The undersigned authorized representative of (blank) school hereby agrees to use the donated equipment listed here on only for technical and scientific education and research. Property hereon donated must be retained by the (blank) school for a minimum of one year from the

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date of this transfer. Signed ..................................................... Date ...............................................

The following procedures must be fully complied with for a property donation under the above referenced Act and Executive Order: (1) The Accountable Officer is designated as the authorized official to approve donations. (2) Property targeted for donation must meet the requirements of IPMD 114-43.102.51. (3) The donee must enter into a written agreement prior to the initial donation of property. (4) Donations will be accomplished by completing a Standard Form (SF) 122 “Transfer Order Excess Personal Property” which includes authority references, i.e., Stevenson-Wylder and\or E.O. 12999. (a) The SF 122 must be signed by both the Accountable Property Officer and an authorized official of the donee organization/institution. (b) The SF 122 must reference the number or other unique identification symbol of the cooperative agreement. (c) A completed signed copy of the SF 122 must be kept on file at both the donor and authorizing official offices. The donor office copy must be kept on file for a minimum of three years. The authorizing official’s copy must be retained until reporting requirements in 11444.5006 are met. (d) The Accountable Property Officer may approve donations of excess personal property in the following Federal Supply Category (FSC): FSC

Name

19 20 23 32 34 35 36 40 43 48 49 51 52 56

Ships, small craft, pontoons, and floating docks Ship and Marine Equipment Ground Effect Vehicles, Motor Vehicles, Trailers, and Cycles Woodworking Machinery Metalworking Machinery Service and Trade Equipment Special Industry Machinery (copiers) Rope, cable, chain, and fittings Pumps, compressors Valves Maintenance and repair shop equipment Hand tools Measuring tools Construction and building materials

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58 59 61 66 67 70 71 74 75 76 77 81 88

Communications, detection, and coherent radiation equipment Electrical and electronic equipment and components Electric wire, batteries, and power distribution equipment Instruments and laboratory equipment Photographic equipment General purpose automatic data process equipment, software, supplies, and support equipment. Office furniture, shelving, bins, miscellaneous fixtures Office machines and visible record equipment Office supplies, devices, and accessories Books, maps and other publications Musical instruments, phonographs, and home-type radios (specifically televisions and two-way radios) Containers, packaging, and packing supplies Live animals

(4) Property condition: This donation authority will not be used as a method of “dumping” excess property or as an alternative to authorized reduction to scrap. Property targeted for donation should be in working condition and not obsolete for the purposes for which it is intended. However, at the request of the donee, inoperable or obsolete property may be donated for disassembly and reuse of parts. (5) Title to property: Title to excess personal property donated under this section will automatically pass to the donee once appropriate documentation is completed. A donee may not dispose of property that is operable or not obsolete until at least one year from the date of transfer. (6) Costs: Donated excess personal property is free of charge. However, the donee will pay all costs associated with packaging and transportation, unless other arrangements have been made. (7) Reports: The Accountable Property Officer shall forward a copy of each approved SF 122 to the Regional/Center Property Manager for consolidation and submission to the Property Management Officer, WASO by September 30 of each calendar year. For Federal agencies, the Computers for Learning website at http://www.computersforlearning.gov provides a quick and easy system for donating excess and surplus computers to schools and educational nonprofits based upon indications of need. It also provides a virtually paper-free system for donating computers and automatically tracks donations so that each agency can easily generate its annual report to the General Services Administration. For schools and educational nonprofits, the Computers for Learning website at http://www.computersforlearning.gov provides one universal form to easily register to request excess and surplus Federal computer equipment. The website also provides a technology tutorial, information for finding assistance if computers require upgrading, and contact information for finding volunteers with technical computer knowledge. If a school or educational nonprofit organization does not have the ability to register on the website, it can register by calling the toll-free hotline at (888) 362-7870.

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10.30 -- Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property This section provides guidance and procedures governing the disposal by public sale, or abandonment or destruction of personal property (including salvage, scrap, and waste materials) under the jurisdiction of the NPS of the Department of the Interior when such property is no longer needed for use in authorized Federal agency programs or is replaced with a similar type of property. Museum property is disposed of in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II, Museum Records, Chapter 6, Deaccessioning. This section does not apply to: (1) Foreign excess personal property, or (2) Properties which are sold or otherwise disposed of pursuant to special statutes authorizing, directing, or requiring the Department of the Interior to dispose of specific properties such as helium, maps, electrical power, irrigation and municipal water, trust properties of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and other properties which are disposed in furtherance of Interior programs, except as provided in IPMD 114-45.317. 10.31 -- Sale of Personal Property Sale of personal property to Federal employees is legal. Care must be taken, however, to avoid the impression by the public that Federal employees enjoy an unfair advantage because of personal knowledge or prior use of items available for sale. Detailed knowledge of the condition of an item is obviously advantageous in determining a bid amount. Therefore, the following shall apply to all sales of personal property: (1) Federal employees are eligible to bid only on: (a) Personal property reported to the General Services Administration as excess and found to be surplus by the NPS without regard to whether the sale is conducted by GSA or by the holding park/unit or office. (b) Motor vehicles and other personal property being sold for replacement purposes pursuant to the Exchange\Sale authority found in section 201(c) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended (40 U.S.C.481c), provided that such property meets prescribed replacement standards. (c) Surplus personal property offered in public sales by Consolidated Administrative Support Units (CASU). The selling CASU must be formally established by the General Services Administration and have delegated authority to conduct such sales. (2) Federal employees may only bid on personal property sold by the publicly advertised sealed bid or public auction sales methods. (3) Notices of Public auction and invitations to Bid will state the extent to which Federal employees are eligible to bid and provide that any Federal employee submitting a bid must identify himself/herself, his or her organization, and position.

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(4) Awards shall not be made to: (a) Any employee of the NPS who served on the Board of Survey with regard to property being sold, determined that it was no longer needed, or is connected directly with any aspect of the sale, or (b) Any Federal employee whose past association with the property being sold has been such that he or she might reasonably be considered to be bidding from an advantageous position. (5) The provisions of IPMD 114-45.302 are applicable to Federal employees and to members of their immediate families, specifically the spouses and children of such employees. 10.32 -- Conduct of Sales The revised FMR 102-38 dated April 17, 2008, requires that all Federal agencies use the e-FAS Sales Centers for selling surplus property. DOI may only sell property through one of the following Sales Centers (SC): General Services Administration National Business Center - Aviation Directorate (aircraft and aircraft parts only) The Oregon State Agency for Surplus Property (ORSASP) is not an approved Sales Center for federal property. Until such time as NPS receives a waiver, as indicated in the CFR, the NPS must use one of the above referenced sales center. All surplus property must be sold through a sales center unless it falls under one of the categories listed below in accordance with FMR 102-38-10. (1) Generally, an executive agency must follow the regulations of FMR 102-38-20 selling all personal property; however— (a) Materials acquired for the national stockpile or supplemental stockpile, or materials or equipment acquired under section 303 of the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended (50 U.S.C. App. 2093) are excepted from this part; (b) The Maritime Administration, Department of Transportation, has jurisdiction over the disposal of vessels of 1,500 gross tons or more and determined by the Secretary to be merchant vessels or capable of conversion to merchant use; (c) Sales made by the Secretary of Defense pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 2576 (Sale of Surplus Military Equipment to State and Local Law Enforcement and Firefighting Agencies) are exempt from these provisions; (d) Foreign excess personal property is exempt from these provisions; and (e) Agency sales procedures which are mandated or authorized under laws other than Title 40 United States Code are exempt from this part. (2) A holding agency is not required to report property in “scrap” condition to its selected SC. Property which has no value except for its basic material content (scrap material) may be disposed of by the holding agency by sale or as otherwise provided in § 102–38.70. However, the holding agency should consult the SC(s) selected by the holding agency as to the feasibility of selling the scrap material. Agencies selling scrap property under authority of this subpart are still required to report sales metrics in accordance with eFAS ESC-approved format and content. (3) All reasonable efforts must be afforded the SC to sell the property. If the property remains unsold after the time frame agreed to between the SC and the holding agency, the holding agency may dispose of the property by sale or as otherwise provided in § 102–38.70. The lack of public interest in buying the property is evidence that the sales proceeds would be minimal.

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Agencies selling property under authority of the above referenced subpart are still required to report sales metrics in accordance with eFAS ESC-approved format and content.

10.33 -- Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property In accordance with Departmental and GSA requirements, the written determination required by FPMR 101-45.901 shall be made in the form of an approved Report of Survey or Certificate of Unserviceable Property. Public notice of intent to abandon or destroy property must be given, except as noted in FPMR 101-45.902-2. Included in the notice should be an offer to sell in accordance with FPMR 101-45.304-2. Such public notice must be provided in a local newspaper and/or through the posting of signs in one or more common use facilities available to the public. Abandonment or destruction without notice: The written determination required by FPMR 10145.902-2 shall be made in the form of an approved Report of Survey or Certificate of Unserviceable Property that has been reviewed and signed by the Reviewing Official as specified by IPMD 410 114-60.8. Property may be abandoned or destroyed, without public notice, if the value of the property is so little or the cost of its care and handling is so great that its retention for advertising for sale, even as scrap, is clearly not economical; or abandonment or destruction is required because of health, safety, or security reasons; any item of property with an original cost (estimated, if unknown) of less than $500.00 shall normally be considered for abandonment or destruction, without public notice, due to the expense and difficulty of care and handling, such as used or obsolete charts, electric light bulbs, radio tubes, and resistors. 10.34 -- Lost and Found Unclaimed Property Employees finding or receiving money, jewelry, or other valuable articles must immediately place them in the care of a Supervisor who must deposit them in a safe or other secure storage facility. Any lost and found personal property found on premises owned or leased by the National Park Service will remain in the custody of and be the responsibility of the Service to dispose. The Federal Management Regulations do not permit the NPS to return any property to the finder. Lost and found property must be held for a period of 30 days. Items which are not claimed by the owner within the 30 days will be considered abandoned to the United States and title of ownership is automatically transferred to the NPS, except that title reverts to the owner where a proper claim is filed by the owner prior to official use or transfer for official use and prior to sale of the property. Owners claiming found property must sign for and receive the article after presenting proof of ownership and their personal identification. This information will be recorded on the Form 10-166. All unclaimed monies will be deposited into a NPS special fund account for a period of three years, if no proper claim has been filed after the 3 year period, the monies will be turned over to the US Treasury. Firearms may be returned to the owner only after all State and NPS law enforcement requirements have been met. All lost and found property brought to the attention of an employee by the finder will be

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recorded by the employee on NPS Form 10-166 (Lost and Found Report). Care must be exercised, when completing the above referenced form to insure that sufficient information is being recorded to identify the property. A case number using the standard Park Service Case Incident Reporting System will be assigned to the form and recorded on all property records. Accountable Property Officers must designate an individual to be responsible for the receipt, storage, and security of found property. Employees authorized to have keys and access to the property storage areas will be held to an absolute minimum. Semi-annual inventories and/or audits must be made of all stored found property. The responsible individual must certify, in writing to the Accountable Property Officer, that inventories or audits have been completed and that all property is accounted for and is in agreement with official property records (Form 10-166). When an audit or inventory reveals that an article is missing or unaccounted for, the Accountable Property Officer will notify in writing, the designated responsible individual and take appropriate actions deemed necessary. Items of little or no value such as single gloves, broken or damaged property, toys, clothing/apparel, false teeth, eyeglasses and similar property do not have to be reported to the General Services Administration (GSA), but must be documented on a Report of Survey and destroyed and have at least one NPS employee present to witness the destruction and certify as such on the Report of Survey. Items of property which can be clearly identified as usable by the Service will be retained and placed on equipment inventories in accordance with 41 CFR 101-48. Lost and found property such as jewelry and other valuable articles must be reported to the GSA and handled in the same manner as excess property under the Federal Management Regulations (FMR) 102-36.285 and 102-36.290. GSA will sell the property for the NPS, and proceeds from the sale will be placed in an NPS special fund account. When reporting lost and found property to GSA on the SF 126, Report for Personal Property for Sale Report, you must include the special fund appropriation code to be reimbursed. 10.35 -- Recovery of Precious Metals Accountable Property Officers are responsible for establishing and pursuing a program for recovery of precious metals in accordance with the provision of FPMR 101-45.10. The annual Report of Activities Generating Precious Metals, Standard Form 291, is no longer required. 10.36 -- Exchange/Sale Authority When acquiring replacement personal property, similar items may be exchanged or sold and agencies are authorized to apply the exchange allowance or the proceeds from sale in such cases in total or in partial payment for the replacement property acquired. Any transaction of exchange sale shall be evidenced in writing. A determination shall be made in each case whether exchange or sale shall obtain the greater return for the Government. All administrative and overhead costs shall be considered when estimating the return by either method. If the sales transaction for a line item has estimated proceeds of less than $100, it is normally considered to be uneconomical. If exchange is also impractical or the exchange allowance is unreasonably low, the property shall be declared excess and processed in accordance FPMR 101-43. Museum property is exchanged in accordance with procedures outlined in the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II.

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10.37 -- Transfer and Exchange between Federal Agencies Property available for exchange or sale pursuant to section 201(c) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended, is not "available" property, nor does it become excess or surplus. The Accountable Officer shall apply the same utilization and transfer requirements FMR 102-39.40 requires for other Federal agencies. 10.38 -- Restrictions and Limitations Accountable Property Officers are responsible for establishing procedures to provide adequate control and documentation of exchange/sale transactions. Items which are found in any of the FSC groups listed in FMR 102-39.45 are not eligible for exchange/sale. The application of exchange allowances or proceeds of sale in whole or in part payment for personal property acquired is authorized only when all of the conditions prescribed in FMR 102-39.45 apply. Forfeited property certification is required to exchange or sell forfeited property placed in official use for less than one year. 10.39 -- Special Authorizations Without monetary appraisal or detailed listing or reporting, books and periodicals in NPS libraries may be exchanged for other books and periodicals in the NPS. Museum property is exchanged and transferred in accordance with the NPS Museum Handbook. 10.40 -- Exchange and Sale Procedures This property shall be handled in the same manner as surplus property under FMR 102-38, but identified as replacement property subject to the same exemptions and exceptions on reporting as otherwise would be applicable to surplus personal property. Most exchange transactions shall occur when a vendor delivers a replacement item and removes the item replaced. This is the most efficient and cost-effective exchange procedure because the item is delivered, when the item to be replaced is immediately removed by the vendor. An agency may internally reassign eligible items no longer needed by one organizational unit to another for use by the gaining unit for exchange with the supplier of a replacement item. An item reassigned for exchange purposes may be delivered directly to the supplier of the replacement item to minimize storage and handling. Museum property exchange procedures are outlined in the NPS Museum Handbook, Part II, Museum Records.

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Section 11: Motor Vehicle Management 11.0 -- Purpose This section contains the policy governing the management, operation, maintenance, acquisition, assignment, utilization and disposal requirements for NPS owned, leased or rented motor vehicles and related services. This section supersedes any previous NPS policies and procedures pertaining to motor vehicle management. 11.1 -- Scope The provisions of this section are applicable to motor vehicles owned, leased, or otherwise managed by the NPS and are intended to promote maximum uniformity and cost effectiveness of motor vehicle management within the NPS. 11.2 -- Authority In accordance with Departmental and NPS requirements, regions/centers, offices, and parks/units will manage their Motor Vehicle Programs consistent with the provisions of this section, and the following authorities: A.

31 U.S.C. 1344, “Passenger Carrier Use”

B.

40 U.S.C. Chapter 20, “Federal Motor Vehicle Expenditure Control” (PL 99-272)

C.

40 U.S.C. 483, “Property Utilization”

D.

40 U.S.C. 491, “Motor Vehicle Pools and Transportation Systems”

E.

5 CFR 930.101, “Programs for Specific Positions and Examinations”, Subpart A, Motor Vehicle Operators

F.

41 CFR Chapter 102, Federal Management Regulations (FMR) Subparts 102-5 and 102-34

G.

Executive Order 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management”

H.

Public Law 102-486, Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992

I.

Public Law 101-194, Ethics Reform Act

J.

IPMD-114-60.8, Survey Procedures

K.

31 U.S.C. 1349, “Adverse Personnel Actions”

L.

Public Law 109-58, Energy Policy Act of 2005

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M. Department of the Interior Asset Management Plan N.

NPS Fleet Management Strategic Plan

O.

NPS Asset Management Plan

11.3 -- Responsibilities Regional Directors/Center Managers are responsible for administering Motor Vehicle Programs in accordance with the provisions of this section and Departmental policies, standards, and procedures. The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO will serve as the primary focal point for all issues requiring coordination with the Department of the Interior and the General Services Administration (GSA). Fleet Managers will administer their Motor Vehicle Programs in accordance with this section and other applicable Departmental policies, standards, procedures, guidelines and the NPS Fleet Management Strategic Plan. The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO will exercise the appropriate management and technical supervision, and develop policy guidance, procedures, and technical instructions for the NPS concerning the acquisition, use, maintenance, disposition, and reporting of motor vehicles and motor equipment to ensure effective and efficient administration over the motor vehicle program. Fleet Managers and Motor Vehicle operators responsibilities are also outlined in the NPS Fleet Management Strategic Plan and section 1.5 (g) (h) (i) and (j) of this handbook. 11.4 -- Definitions Alternative Fueled Vehicle (AFV): Those vehicles operating on natural gas (CNG or LNG), alcohols (neat or blends down to 70%), hydrogen, propane, coal liquids, other bio-fuels (such as bio-diesel), electricity, or fuels "substantially not petroleum.” Bureau: Includes the bureaus, offices, services, and other major components of the Department of the Interior; i.e., the NPS is a bureau. Extreme Use Conditions: Any vehicle that will be used under conditions other than normal wear and tear; i.e., off-road use, exposure to environmental or chemical elements. Fleet Management Strategic Plan: The set of National Park Service’s fleet management goals designed to optimize utilization of vehicles within the regions/centers and parks/offices, improve fleet management, ensure consistency of management of vehicles and equipment, reduce the overall fleet size and maximize the use of consolidated acquisitions and adopting best practices. Government-furnished Motor Vehicles: NPS owned vehicles, vehicles leased from the GSA Fleet and vehicles leased from commercial sources. GSA Fleet Lease: Obtaining a motor vehicle from the General Services Administration (GSA Fleet). Where “lease” is used alone, it refers to a motor vehicle which is not leased from the GSA Fleet (i.e. a motor vehicle leased from a commercial source).

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Home-To-Work Transportation: Use of a Government vehicle for transportation by an employee between his/her residence and place of employment, other than official temporary duty travel assignments, requiring advanced written approval by the Secretary of the Interior. Law Enforcement Vehicle: A passenger automobile or light truck that is specifically approved in an agency's appropriation for use in apprehension, surveillance, police or other law enforcement work, or specifically designed for use in law enforcement. If not identified in an agency’s appropriation language, a motor vehicle qualifies as a law enforcement vehicle only in the following cases: (1) A passenger automobile having heavy duty components for electrical, cooling and suspension systems and at least the next higher cubic inch displacement or more powerful engine than is standard for the automobile concerned. (2) A light truck having emergency warning lights and is identified with markings such as “police.” (3) An unmarked vehicle certified by the agency head as essential for the safe and efficient performance of intelligence, counterintelligence, protective, or other law enforcement duties. (4) A motor vehicle seized by a Federal agency that is subsequently used for the purpose of performing law enforcement activities. Light Duty Motor Vehicle: Any motor vehicle with a gross motor vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 8,500 pounds or less. Light Truck: A motor vehicle on a truck chassis with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 8,500 pounds or less. Motorized Equipment: Includes construction and maintenance equipment, materials handling equipment, forestry and agricultural equipment, vessels, aircraft, and aircraft ground support equipment. Motor Vehicle: Self-propelled and has two or more pneumatic, hydraulic tires, and designed primarily for transportation of personnel or material. Motorized equipment shall be classified as a motor vehicle if it meets the above minimum qualifications but does not include a military design motor vehicle or vehicles not covered by 41 CFR 102-34. Motor Vehicle Acquisition: Purchasing or leasing a motor vehicle from a commercial source, obtaining a General Services Administration (GSA) provided motor vehicle, or obtaining a motor vehicle through transfer, excess or donation. Motor Vehicle Identification: All DOI Government-owned or leased motor vehicles (unless exempted, i.e., undercover Law Enforcement vehicles) must display the legends “For Official Use Only” and “U.S. Government” Official, U.S. Government tags, and DOI identification. If the new UNICOR “I” license tag is used, then legends for “For Official Use Only” are not required: (1)

Associate Directors for Administration, or their equivalent, may authorize the removal or

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substitution of license plates from Interior administrative vehicles if it is determined that conspicuous identification would interfere with discharge of duties or endanger the security of individuals or the United States Government. (2) A certification to GSA for removal or substitution of license plates is necessary when using a GSA leased vehicle. A copy of the certification, signed by the Associate Director for Administration, or their equivalent, must be provided to the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO, attn: NPS Property Management Program Manager. Motor Vehicle Lease: Obtaining a motor vehicle by contract or other arrangement from a commercial source for 60 continuous days or more. Motor Vehicle Operators: Those employees and supervisors who are entrusted with and authorized to operate government owned or leased vehicles. They are responsible for ensuring the safe and efficient control and operation of these vehicles. Motor Vehicle Registration and Inspection: A motor vehicle owned or leased by the Government that is regularly based or operated outside the District of Columbia and displaying U.S. Government license plates and motor vehicle identification, need not to be registered in a State, Commonwealth, territory or possession of the United States. Motor Vehicle Rental: To obtain a motor vehicle by contract, schedule, or other arrangements for less than 60 continuous days. Motor Vehicles Transferred from Excess: Obtaining a motor vehicle reported as excess and transferred with or without cost. Passenger Automobile: A sedan, station wagon or van designed primarily to transport people. Preventive Maintenance: The scheduled systematic care, servicing, and inspection of a vehicle to keep it in good operating condition, and to detect and correct mechanical defects. The term "Preventive Maintenance" means the same as “scheduled maintenance". Tag: The official U.S. Government motor vehicle identification plate, or license plate of any state, territory, or possession of the United States. Unscheduled Maintenance: Maintenance or repairs required to correct an unanticipated but known or suspected malfunction or failure of a motor vehicle system or component. Vehicle Log: A record used primarily to document the official use of a Government vehicle containing, but not limited to, the following information: Vehicle type, tag number, location, date of use, time in/out, ending odometer reading, and operator. Vehicle Jacket: A file which is maintained for each motor vehicle at the location where the vehicle is assigned. The vehicle jacket must contain all pertinent vehicle information including a DI Form 120 "Operators Record", all in-house and contractor inspection and maintenance records, vehicle acquisition and receipt documents, manufacturer's certificate of origin, vehicle disposal documents, and copies of all correspondence pertaining to the motor vehicle.

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11.5 -– Acquiring Fuel Efficient Motor Vehicles 41 CFR, Subpart 102-34 describes the policies and procedures to be followed in acquiring fuel efficient motor vehicles. All of the units within the National Park Service are dedicated to promoting vehicle energy efficiency and reducing petroleum consumption through emphasis on fuel efficient use, driving and maintenance of fleet vehicles; the acquisition of alternative fueled vehicles; use of oxygenated gasoline, all alternative fuels such as natural gas, petroleum gas, methanol, and electricity, and increasing the Corporate Average Fuel Efficiency (CAFE) of fleet vehicles. 11.6 -– Motor Vehicle Acquisitions Prior to acquiring a vehicle from excess, lease, new procurement, or acceptance via transfer or donation, it must be justified and approved by the Regional/Center office, regardless of the source of supply and/or funding. The vehicle must be approved before entering into any type of agreement with another Federal agency, private organization, entering transactions into the GSA AutoChoice System, or if applicable, requesting a waiver through the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO to purchase the vehicle locally. The GSA will not accept hard copies of requisitions. All requisitions must be processed in the AutoChoice System. The GSA is the mandatory source of supply for procurement of all new commercially available motor vehicles, unless non-standard vehicles are specifically required. Commercially available vehicles are vehicles produced by the manufacturers or dealers in substantial quantities and sold to the general public and are intended for the purpose of meeting the government’s mission. Non-standard vehicles are vehicles with particular specifications to meet special needs and/or tailored to specific performance standards. All motor vehicles must be acquired in accordance with 41 CFR 101-26.5 and wherever practical, requirements for motor vehicles must be satisfied under the GSA’s existing standardized buying programs. Federal specifications and standards must be used in the purchasing of vehicles, motorized equipment, accessories, and additional equipment except when the essential needs of the NPS are not adequately covered by an existing Federal specification. All requisitions for commercially available vehicles must be processed via GSA’s AutoChoice System. In addition to the motor vehicle acquisition process referenced above, the NPS must fulfill the acquisition requirements for Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFVs) established by section 303 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Once a need to procure a motor vehicle has been identified and justified, and approval has been granted by the region/center, offices can access AutoChoice on the GSA website at: www.autochoice.gsa.gov. 11.7 -- Sources of Supply for Motor Vehicles The following sources of supply are available for obtaining motor vehicles: (1) Motor vehicles transferred from excess (2) Motor vehicle purchase

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(3) Motor vehicle lease (4) Motor vehicle rental (5) GSA Fleet lease Although excess is the first source of supply, vehicles must not be obtained from excess sources when the costs of such acquisitions; i.e., reimbursement, transportation, and repair/rehabilitation costs are expected to exceed the economic value of the vehicle. 11.8 -- Mandatory Provisions Affecting the Acquisition and Use of Motor Vehicles GSA is not the mandatory source or does not purchase tactical vehicles, experimental, prototype, used vehicles or vehicles equipped with aftermarket converted engines for use with alternative fuels. GSA waivers are not required to purchase these exempt vehicles. GSA approval is required for the local purchase of motor vehicles from commercial sources. The following procedures must be followed: (1) A request for a waiver justifying the local purchase must be submitted in writing to the WASO Property Management Officer. The justification shall include as a minimum, the following information: (a) A completed GSA Form 1781 showing a full description of the vehicle to be procured and identifying all accessories and additional equipment. This requirement may be met by referencing a Federal Standard (and item number), or a Federal specification. An estimate of the cost of the vehicle shall also be provided. (b) A statement of the purpose(s) for which the vehicle will be used. (c) The nature of the operating environment, mission, or urgent circumstances requiring procurement by the region/center, office or park/unit. (d) An explanation of the circumstances which prevented the vehicle requirements from being anticipated in time to permit procurement through normal GSA channels. (e) A statement (including the supporting rationale) that similar vehicles are not available from excess sources or the active inventory; or if available, cannot be used to meet essential mission requirements. (f) A description of the efforts made to obtain the vehicle from the fleet management system. (g) The availability of similar vehicles on a lease basis and the monthly cost of leasing the vehicle. (h) The date the vehicle must be available for use by the requesting activity.

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(i) The consequences to the mission and the cost impact which would result if the waiver request was denied. In accordance with Departmental, GSA and NPS policies, the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO shall evaluate each request for waiver(s) and, if approved, forward the request in writing to GSA. When GSA determines that procurement of an individual requirement would offer no advantage over local purchase of the item, GSA may grant the ordering activity authority to purchase the vehicle locally. When such a determination is made, the order will be returned to the ordering activity with written approval to locally purchase the vehicle specified in the waiver request. Regions/centers, offices and parks/units must retain copies of the solicitation, bids received, the awarded contract, and evidence of delivery in a file for audit purposes. The waiver issued by GSA for local purchase of motor vehicles is not a waiver for proprietary (sole source) procurement. 11.9 -- Leasing of Motor Vehicles The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO is responsible for coordinating all matters pertaining to vehicle leases. Regions/centers, offices and parks/units with requirements to lease vehicles from commercial sources for a period of 60 days or more must first attempt to obtain the necessary vehicle(s) from the local GSA Fleet Management Center (FMC). (1) If the FMC is unable to provide the needed vehicle(s) or it is determined not to be cost effective, the request to commercially lease vehicles must be submitted to the WASO Property Management Program Manager for approval. The request must include the following information: •







a statement of the purpose(s) for which the vehicle will be used, the nature of the operating environment, mission, or circumstances requiring lease by the region/center, office or park/unit; an explanation of the circumstances which prevented the vehicle requirements from being anticipated in time to permit leasing through normal GSA channels; or to be met by GSA in a cost effective manner; a statement (including the supporting rationale) that similar vehicles are not available from excess sources or the active inventory; or if available, cannot be used to meet essential mission requirements; and a description of the efforts made to obtain the vehicle from the fleet management system.

(2) If authorization to lease commercially is granted, the Determination of Capital vs. Operating Lease Spreadsheet located in the Property Management website (www.nps.gov/propertymanagement) must be completed and a copy provided to the WASO Property Management Program Manager along with a copy of the initial lease agreement that includes the start and end dates of the lease, monthly/annual lease payment amount, total cost of lease for the duration of the lease period; and the cost to exercise the option to leaseto-own or buy-out the lease, when applicable. (3) Regions/centers, offices or parks/units seeking to lease Class IV passenger carrying vehicles, whether from the FMC or a commercial source, must first obtain authorization from the WASO Property Management Program Manager. Vehicles must be selected to achieve maximum fuel efficiency. The motor vehicle body size, engine size, and optional equipment

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must be limited to what is essential to meet the NPS mission. With the exception of motor vehicles used by the President and the Vice President and motor vehicles for security and highly essential needs, the NPS must purchase and lease midsize (Class III) or smaller sedans. The purchase and lease of large (Class IV) sedans will only be done when such motor vehicles are essential to the NPS mission. 11.10 -– Motor Vehicle Identification and Exemptions Unless exempted, vehicles owned by NPS must have U.S. Government and agency identification on tags provided by the Federal Prison Industries (UNICOR) with the agency “I” tag. Vehicles leased from GSA should obtain their tags at vehicle delivery from the appropriate GSA Fleet Management Center. Vehicles are exempted from the display of U.S. Government and agency identification and tags when they are issued primarily for investigations, law enforcement, or intelligence duties involving security activities or the safety of the vehicle’s occupants. Exemptions from displaying U.S. Government tags and other identification may be approved when U.S. Government identification may endanger the security of individuals or the United States Government or interfere with the purpose for which the motor vehicle is used. Written requests for exemptions for GSA leased vehicles must be approved by the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO. The request must state that the motor vehicle is used primarily for investigative, law enforcement, and intelligence duties involving security activities or the safety of the vehicle’s occupants, and that conspicuous identification will interfere with the discharge of such duties or endanger the security of individuals or the United States Government. Exemptions are limited to 1 year, and certification may be resubmitted, if necessary, at the end of the year. A certification for temporary removal of the official U.S. Government identification from vehicles must be approved by the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO. Written requests for exemptions for GSA leased vehicles must be submitted to the GSA Office of Vehicle Acquisition and Leasing for action with copies forwarded to the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO for submission to the Director, PAM. Exempted vehicles must have tags issued by the State, Commonwealth, territory, or possession in which the vehicle is principally operated. Vehicles regularly used for administrative purposes not directly connected with law enforcement, investigative, or intelligence duties involving security activities are not exempt. It is not necessary to display the markings “For Official Use Only”, “U.S. Government,” and agency identification on motor vehicles rented from private or commercial sources for a period of less than 6 months and used primarily for off-highway work (i.e., tractors, graders, and front end loaders). Such vehicles leased for periods of 6 months or longer, must display the official U.S. Government legend and tags, and agency identification. Sedans and station wagons acquired for 60 continuous days or more must have this identification. 11.11 -– Vehicle License Plates Official U.S. Government license plates will not be transferred to other Federal agencies or to other bureaus within the Department of the Interior. The plates must be removed and destroyed, prior to the transfer (shipment) of the vehicle. License plates may be transferred

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along with vehicles relocated to other activities within the NPS. If plates are transferred along with the vehicle(s), a memorandum indicating that the tags were transferred along with the vehicle must be forwarded immediately to the WASO Property Management Officer. 11.12 -- Lost or Stolen License Plates Report all lost or stolen government identification badges, facility/office keys, access cards, key code numbers, vehicle access placards/decals, government license plates and/or government emergency vehicles immediately to the Department of the Interior 24-hour Watch Office at (202) 208-4108 or via e-mail at [email protected] When notifying the DOI Watch Office, include the circumstances of the loss or theft and unique identifiers of the lost or stolen government property. This notification will be in addition to the standard NPS policies and procedures related to lost or stolen government property. 11.13 -– Assignment of License Plate Numbers A Department-wide master record showing the blocks of license plate numbers which have been allocated to the NPS is maintained in the Interior Service Center, Office of the Secretary. The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO will request for the assignment of additional license plate numbers for the NPS from the Interior Service Center, Facilities Management and Services, Attn: Fleet Management Officer. 11.14 -– Requisitions for License Plates NPS employees will requisition license plates from the Brentwood and Rocky Mountain Storehouses (See Section 7 of this handbook) via the NPS Central Supply Inventory Management System (http://npssurvey.nps.gov/pjr/login.asp). The Issuing Officer will issue all license plates and maintain a current list of all official U. S. Government license plates in use on motor vehicles for which the NPS is accountable. The regional office will also maintain a listing of license plate numbers, specifying the motor vehicle to which the plates are assigned and must include complete information regarding all reassignments of license plates and voided tag numbers. 11.15 -- Official Use of Government Motor Vehicles Government owned, leased, or otherwise managed motor vehicles, shall be obtained and utilized only to the extent required for the efficient and effective transaction of official Government business. Government motor vehicles are not provided for the convenience of NPS employees. All regions/centers, offices and parks/units shall ensure compliance with Departmental and GSA policies and regulations and that all employees are aware of the policy that Government vehicles are to be used only for the purpose for which they were obtained or for other officially designated purposes. It is official business when a Government motor vehicle is used:

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A. To carry out authorized programs, including program work under contractual arrangements; B. To render assistance in major disasters or emergency situations; C. While on official temporary duty (TDY) travel assignments as documented and approved on DOI Form 1020 (Travel Authorization). Secretary approval is not required for hometo-work transportation during official travel. This includes using a Government motor vehicle for transportation for the following purposes: a. Between official station and temporary duty locations; b. Between residence and common carrier terminal and from the common carrier terminal to the residence; c. Within the metropolitan area of the official station; d. From common carrier terminals at a temporary duty station to place of business and between such places if more than one is involved; e. From common carrier terminals at a temporary duty station to place of lodging; f. From place of lodging to place of business at a temporary duty station where reasonable public transportation is not available or where the use of a Government vehicle for such purposes would be advantageous to the Government; g. From place of lodging at a temporary duty station, where other reasonable means of transportation are not available, to obtain goods or services necessary to the health and well-being of the employee. This includes travel in a Government vehicle to obtain medical services, attend religious services, and to obtain goods and services at restaurants, barbershops, beauty shops, drugstores, laundries, and dry-cleaning establishments. D. In accordance with The Ethics Reform Act of 1989, Section 503 (Public Law 101-194, November 30, 1989), which allows agency heads to prescribe by rule the appropriate conditions for incidental uses (other than for official business) of Government-owned or leased motor vehicles. E. In accordance with Home-To-Work policy, use of Government vehicles for transportation by an employee between his/her residence and place of employment requires advance written approval by the Secretary. This authority may not be delegated. F. To transport Personnel of Other Federal agencies, and Non-Federal Employees. An employee may transport persons who are not employed by DOI only under the following conditions: a. To transport employees of other Federal agencies and non-Federal employees conducting official business when it benefits the Government and does not interfere with accomplishing the employee’s primary business; b. To transport persons in emergency or disaster situations while assisting persons with injuries or in pain, and preventing serious damage to persons or property. G. In accordance with the policy addressing Transport of Family Members and Others. DOI employees shall not transport family members, friends, or other persons who are not conducting official business in a Government vehicle (except as provided in 2D(2), above). This does not authorize transportation to/from an employee’s residence. H. Contractor and Grantee Use of Government vehicles: a) Managers who provide contractors and/or grantees with Governmentowned or leased motor vehicles are responsible for ensuring that such vehicles are used only for the performance of the work authorized under such Government contracts and grants, only to the extent provided in the Federal Acquisition Regulations, Subpart 51.2;

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b) Managers must ensure that contractors and grantees establish and enforce suitable penalties for their employees who willfully use or authorize the use of Government motor vehicles for other than official purposes; c) Contractors or grantees assume any cost or expense incident to any use not related to the performance of the grant or contract. Such assumption of cost or expense is without the right of reimbursement from the Government. 11.16 – Transportation of Non-official Passengers

Federal Government employees must always be mindful of the Government-wide rules and regulations that are put in place to safeguard Government property and maintain the public’s trust. Things work best when there is a single set of rules and regulations that apply across the board. This is the case with our rules and regulations on use of Government-owned and leased vehicles, which require that Government vehicles be used only for the purpose for which they were obtained or for other official designated purposes. The only exceptions under GSA regulations are bona fide emergency conditions which threaten loss of life or property. Because the use of Government vehicles for unofficial purposes carries with it a mandatory 30day suspension, NPS employees are extremely mindful of the need to follow proper procedures. Most of our non-official transport occurs in remote or difficult to access locations, where employees cannot reasonably drive their privately owned vehicles nor have access to public transportation. These are situations where there is no real physical threat or no likelihood of loss of life or property, and the employees are uncertain as to whether their situation would qualify as a “hardship.” Fortunately, Congress has recognized that these types of situations do, in fact, constitute a hardship, and has given the NPS special authority in recognition thereof. In particular, section 1a-2(a) of title 16 of the United States Code allows transportation for employees located at isolated areas of the national park system and to members of their families, where (1) such areas are not adequately served by commercial transportation, and (2) such transportation is incidental to official transportation services. What this means is that it is permissible not only to transport employees under these circumstances, it is permissible also to transport family members. Because of this hardship situation, and in accordance with the authority granted by 16 U.S.C. 1a-2(a), any employee, in the course of his or her routine use of a Government-owned or leased vehicle, can provide them transportation assistance. Hitching a ride in a government vehicle, airplane, or boat under these circumstances would be consistent with the law and our policies, and not a basis for disciplinary action. House Report No. 91-1265 noted that the NPS’s use of the authority to provide non-official transportation “…will be limited strictly to areas where commercial transportation is severely limited and where such transportation would not result in any significant cost to the Government.” Employees who wish to transport non-official passengers must obtain prior permission from their supervisor, who may prescribe additional conditions or procedures to prevent the abuse or misuse of Government-owned or leased vehicles.

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11.17 -– Use of Privately Owned Vehicles (POV) for Official Business When an employee is authorized to use a privately-owned vehicle to conduct official business the authorization must be in writing, signed by his or her Superintendent/Manager. In addition, the Superintendent/Manager must also consent to liability for any damages. Otherwise, use of a personal vehicle will be at the risk of the employee and no payment will be authorized. Reimbursement for the use of the POV is on cost per mile basis. 11.18 -– Unauthorized Use of Motor Vehicles Use of Government-owned, or leased or rented vehicles for recreation, conduct of personal business or transporting persons not engaged in official Government business is prohibited except to render assistance in major disasters or emergency situations. (a) Whenever apparent unofficial use of Government motor vehicle(s) is observed, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) and the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO shall be notified. The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO will notify the Office of Acquisition and Property Management (PAM). The OIG, in coordination with PAM, may conduct an internal investigation to determine if a violation has occurred. The OIG office shall furnish a copy of the facts and findings to the Director, PAM and notify the applicable management official(s) of the using activity in writing of the alleged violation. (b) Any officer or employee who willfully uses or authorizes the use of Government vehicles for other than official purposes is subject to a suspension of not less than 30 days or, up to and including, removal by the Secretary of the Interior (31 U.S.C. 1349), (41 CFR 102-34.240). 11.19 -– Adverse and Disciplinary Action Adverse or disciplinary actions against operators must be in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. Contact the appropriate NPS Human Resource Office and the Office of the Solicitor when adverse or disciplinary action is warranted prior to taking any action against an employee. Any employee who willfully uses or allows the use of Government motor vehicles for other than official purposes is subject to disciplinary action. Permission to drive a Government-owned, leased, or rented vehicle may be suspended, and/or revoked from operators, and if warranted, disciplinary or other appropriate action taken against operators for situations such as, but not limited to, the following: (a) State license is revoked; (b) Not qualified to operate a motor vehicle safely because of a physical or medical condition; (c) Convicted of operating under the intoxicating influence of alcohol, narcotics, or pathogenic drugs; (d) Convicted of leaving the scene of an accident without making his or her identity known; (e) Convicted of reckless driving, speeding, at fault accidents or other traffic violations,

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except parking violations; or (f) Guilty of neglect and/or abuse in the care or operation of Government motor vehicles. 11.20 -– Personal Use of Government Owned or Leased Motor Vehicles/Equipment Personal use is prohibited: Authority will not be granted at any level of administrative responsibility for the personal use of any Government owned or leased motor vehicle or heavy equipment. This includes the use of space in a Government garage or repair shop, and Government owned tools, parts, and accessories in the maintenance or repair of privately owned motor vehicles/equipment. Penalties for Violations: Regions/centers, offices and parks/units are required to investigate violations concerning the unauthorized use of Government motor vehicles. 31 U.S.C. 1349(b) provides that any officer or employee who willfully uses, or authorizes the use of a passenger motor vehicle or aircraft owned or leased by the U.S. Government (except for an official purpose authorized under section 1344 of this title) or otherwise violates section 1344 will be suspended from duty by the Director of the NPS. The officer or employee will be suspended for at least one month and when circumstances warrant, for a longer period or summarily removed from office, when circumstances warrant. The law and regulation referenced above prescribe mandatory penalties for the unofficial use of Government owned or leased motor vehicles. 11.21 -- Violation of State and Local Motor Vehicle Traffic Laws Operators of Government-owned, leased or rented vehicles are subject to all parking laws and regulations promulgated by all levels of Government of any authorized public entity. Responses to citations and payment of fines as a result of violating these laws are the personal responsibility of the vehicle operator. 11.22 -– Motor Vehicle Replacement, Assignment, Utilization, Transfer, and Disposal Government motor vehicles should be used only when public transportation is not available, and when it is more advantageous and economical to the Government. Employees must obtain advanced, verbal supervisory approval before operating a motor vehicle. The Regional/Center Fleet Manager is responsible for effectively coordinating motor vehicle assignment, utilization, transfer and disposal requirements in accordance with the NPS Fleet Management Strategic Plan. Motor Vehicle Replacement: Except when determined administratively impractical, a motor vehicle shall be replaced in lieu of being repaired when the cost of repairs is expected to exceed the fair market value of the vehicle. A vehicle that is wrecked or damaged beyond economical repair limits (including wear caused by abnormal operating conditions), may be replaced without regard to the normal replacement standards in 41 CFR 102-34.280. However, a written certification to that effect by the Property Administrator is required prior to replacement. The replacement standards are a minimum only, and therefore, you may keep a Government owned motor vehicle longer than shown in the Standards, if the vehicle can be operated without excessive maintenance costs or substantial reduction in resale value. Regional/Center Fleet Managers shall establish procedures to ensure that the number of Government motor vehicles (including fleet management system vehicles) is kept to the

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minimum necessary to provide economical and efficient transportation services for authorized programs in accordance with this section and the use and replacement standards set forth in 41 CFR 102-34.280. These procedures shall provide for the allocation of motor vehicles based upon the documented vehicle requirements of authorized program activities. Table of Minimum Replacement Standards Motor Vehicle Type Sedan/Station Wagons Ambulances Buses: Intercity City School Trucks: Less than 12,500 pounds GVWR 12,500-23,999 pounds GVWR 24,000 GVWR and over 4- or 6-wheel drive motor vehicles

3 7

Years*

Or Miles* 60,000 60,000

n/a n/a n/a

280,000 150,000 80,000

6 7 9 6

50,000 60,000 80,000 40,000

*Minimum standards are stated in both years and miles; use whichever occurs first. Motor Vehicle Assignment and Usage Records: Regional/Center Fleet Managers shall establish and maintain records and files to identify organizational assignment and utilization, and to provide management with sufficient data to determine that vehicles meet or exceed usage goals and objectives as outlined in the NPS Fleet Management Strategic Plan. They must maintain assignment records on all motor vehicles with sufficient data to justify their assignment and use, and maintain usage records on assigned motor vehicles (except heavy trucks, law enforcement, and special purpose vehicles) containing the following information: (1)

Operator’s name, office symbol and telephone number;

(2)

Date(s) the vehicle is being used;

(3)

Destination address;

(4)

The reason requiring Government motor vehicle transportation;

(5)

A statement as to why public transportation cannot be used, and

(6)

Mileage driven – reported by the operator after the trip is completed.

At a minimum, the DI-120 Operator's Record will be used as a means of recording utilization (days and miles of use) for individual NPS owned or leased motor vehicles. Annual reviews will be conducted on vehicle utilization at the national, regional, State, or area level to determine whether: (1) Additional vehicles are required.

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(2) Fewer vehicles are required, and if so, what disposal action is needed (reassignment, return to the Fleet Management Center, declaration as excess, etc.). (3) There may be possible benefits to the program from reassignment or rotation of motor vehicles. (4) All or part of the requirements may be provided more economically through the use of intermittent rentals or privately-owned vehicles. (5) The number of vehicles is in excess of actual requirements. Each coordinating office will conduct periodic utilization reviews of fleet management system vehicle assignments and take corrective action as needed. Motor Vehicle Share Pools: Wherever possible, motor vehicles shall be assigned to motor pools for the purpose of making them available for the general use of all employees on a dispatch basis. Bureaus with the Department of the Interior, which are co-located in a single area or building, or which are located in close proximity, shall develop local procedures for pooling motor vehicles and vehicle storage and maintenance facilities. Regional/Center Fleet Managers are responsible for developing procedures for identifying opportunities for vehicle pools, and for ensuring that such pools are established whenever the creation of vehicle pools shall result in operational efficiencies and overall economics to the Government. Vehicles should be shared with other services and staff offices whenever possible and other DOI bureau/offices located in close proximity to each other, when feasible. Motor Vehicle Assignments: Assignment of motor vehicles shall be based on the nature of the duties and responsibilities of the organization, the estimated annual mileage to be driven, and the need for an assigned vehicle to perform the duties. Vehicles shall be assigned, based on position responsibilities, not the convenience of the employee, in accordance with procedures established by this section, the NPS Fleet Management Strategic Plan, the estimated annual use (days/trips/hours/miles per year), and the need for an assigned vehicle to perform the duties. Vehicles will only be assigned for the restricted use of individuals when such assignment would be more efficient than pooling in carrying out the work. All requests for vehicle assignments to individual employees must be approved by the Regional/Center Fleet Manager. Each request should fully justify the need for the assignment and document the operational (or other) efficiencies which will be achieved as a result of individual assignment. The request will also explain why the use of a pooled vehicle will not meet the requirements of the mission. (1) All requests must be closely scrutinized, and those which are determined to be valid must be made available locally for review by NPS or Departmental management or survey teams, auditors, or representatives of the Office of the Inspector General. (2) Vehicle assignments to individual employees will not be based on personal preference, or exclusively on the position of the individual involved. Rather the nature of the duties and responsibilities, the estimated annual use (miles per year) of the vehicle, and the need for an assigned vehicle to perform the duties will determine whether an individual motor vehicle assignment is in the best interest of the Government. (3) Regional/Center Fleet Managers will establish procedures for rotating high mileage vehicles with those on low mileage assignments.

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(4) Regional/Center Fleet Managers will periodically evaluate program needs to identify vehicles on hand in excess of actual requirements, and will promptly dispose of excess vehicles.

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11.23 -– Vehicle Utilization Standards Utilization Standards: The utilization standards shown below apply to NPS owned and leased motor vehicles. The utilization standards shown in the “standard annual mileage utilization” column apply to vehicles obtained from the GSA Fleet. Vehicle Type

Standard Annual Mileage Utilization

Minimum Annual Mileage Utilization

Sedans/Station Wagons

12,000

8,000

Multiple Drive Vehicles

7,000

5,000

Trucks (2-wheel Drive (less than 12,500 GVWR)

10,000

5,000

(12,500 -16,999 GVWR)

7,500

4,000

(17,000 GVWR and Over)

7,500

4,000

Buses

35,000

12,000

Inter-city

19,000

10,000

City

10,000

8,000

Retention of vehicles not satisfying minimum utilization criteria shall be individually justified. If actual mileage on a particular vehicle is substantially greater than the standard for that type of vehicle, it shall be rotated with an underutilized similar type of vehicle. If actual mileage on a particular vehicle is less than the minimum utilization standard for that type of vehicle, it shall be rotated with an over-utilized similar type of vehicle if practicable. When chronic underutilization of an individual vehicle or class of vehicles is experienced, one of the following actions must be taken, if appropriate: (1) Place the vehicle in a pool if it is assigned for exclusive use of an individual. (2) Transfer (without replacement) the vehicle to another activity within the NPS, or to another bureau within the Department of the Interior. (3) Dispose (without replacement) of the vehicle through excess channels. (4) Return underutilized GSA vehicles to the Fleet Management Center from which they were

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obtained. 11.24 -– Vehicle Utilization Standard Exceptions Motor vehicles acquired for law enforcement, emergency and rescue, fire suppression, or medical use may not meet the utilization objectives. Underutilized vehicles used for these types of activities may be retained, if it has been determined in writing that they are needed. Retention of underutilized vehicles in other selected use categories shall be justified in writing on a vehicle-by-vehicle basis. In this regard, regions/centers, offices and parks/units shall document the justification for retention of all vehicles that do not meet the minimum annual utilization objectives. 11.25 -- GSA Vehicle Rotation In order to attain the GSA usage objectives, fleet management system vehicles used on high mileage assignments shall be rotated with those on low mileage assignments. In specific cases where the continuous use of a specific vehicle is essential, but its usage does not meet the objectives, the fleet management system issuing the vehicle may require the using activity to furnish a written explanation of the need for excluding the vehicle from the rotation program requirements, except in those instances where it is known that the usage requirements or installed equipment makes it impractical to rotate the vehicle. 11.26 -- Size Restrictions All motor vehicles acquired for use shall be limited to the minimum body size, engine size, and optional equipment necessary to meet the region/center, office or park/unit’s requirements and achieve the maximum fuel efficiency. In accordance with 41 CFR 102-34.45, all exceptions to the size restriction shall be approved by the WASO Property Management Officer unless exempted by 41 CFR 102-34.65. 11.27 -- Fuel Efficiency Requirements In accordance with Executive Order 12375 and 41 CFR 102-34, Subpart A, the NPS must achieve the fleet average fuel economy for the applicable fiscal year. A sedan, station wagon or light truck designed for use in law enforcement or rescue work can only be exempted if it is specifically approved in the appropriation act, or certified by the Property Administrator. An exemption from the provisions referenced above for individual vehicles used for special purposes may be requested. All requests should state the reasons supporting the proposed acquisition of a vehicle which does not meet the fuel economy standard. The WASO Property Management Officer shall review the request and forward to the Director, PAM, for approval. Motor vehicles exempted by GSA will not be included in determining the NPS's fleet average fuel economy. 11.28 -– Vehicle Usage Limitations The NPS will not acquire motor vehicles for the assignment to or for the exclusive use of one individual unless such assignment is required by the nature of the individual's responsibilities or by the frequency, urgency, and extent of the daily requirements for motor vehicle services. Trucks (16,000 lbs. GVWR, or less) will not be acquired for addition to a fleet unless there is a

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known requirement for a period of at least 18 months. For heavier trucks, the known requirement must exist for a period of at least 24 months. Exceptions may be authorized by the Property Administrator or designated Fleet Manager when vehicles are not available from excess sources or from fleet management centers and the cost of leasing the vehicle for the required time period would exceed the purchase price of the vehicle at issue. The justification, including the cost analysis and the approval to purchase, will be retained for review and audit purposes. 11.29 -- Reimbursement for Services (1) GSA Regional Administrators will issue regional bulletins announcing the GSA vehicle rental rates applicable to the region. The NPS will be billed for accidents and incidents. Refer to 41 CFR 101-39.207 for other costs that may be incurred. Fleet Management Center (FMC) services provided to authorized Government contractors and subcontractors will be billed to the responsible office unless such area requests that the contractor be billed directly. In case of nonpayment by a contractor, GSA will bill the responsible area which authorized the contractor's use of the GSA FMC services. (2) GSA bills are issued monthly and can be accessed on the GSA web bill website at: http://finance-kc.gsa.gov/webbill . The site provides the ability to research and analyze billing information relating to the leasing of the FMC vehicles. 11.30 -- Operator's Licenses and Identification Cards Specific regulations covering procedures and qualifications of Government motor vehicle operators are contained in 5 CFR Part 930.105, issued by the Office of Personnel Management. To operate a Government vehicle, civilian employees of the NPS must have a DOI employee identification credential and a current valid state, District of Columbia, commonwealth, territory or possession of the United States operator’s license for the type of vehicle to be operated. Fleet Managers must provide a system for restricting motor vehicle operations to qualified and authorized persons. The use of the United States Government Motor Vehicle Operator’s Identification Card, Optional Form 346 is optional. Fleet Managers must also require a Federal employee who regularly operates a Government, rental, or privately owned motor vehicle for the NPS or a contractor employee who regularly operates a Government motor vehicle to possess a valid state/international license for the class of vehicle being operated. The vehicle operator must notify his/her immediate supervisor, when his/her driver’s license is suspended, revoked, canceled, or he/she has been disqualified from holding a license. Supervisors are responsible for establishing that the employee has the ability to operate a vehicle safely in the operational environment assigned. Parks that transport school-age children must require drivers to be licensed in accordance with regulations administered by the Federal Highway Administration and the States wherein the children are transported. Motor vehicle operators must be at least 18 years old, or the higher age at which persons in that jurisdiction may hold an unrestricted driver’s license. In addition to the requirements of 485 DM 16.3B, require a person who drives commercial motor vehicles (having either a gross vehicle weight (GVW) rating of more than 26,000 lbs,

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towing a vehicle with a 10,000 lb or more GVW rating, hauling hazardous material requiring the vehicle to be placarded, or operating a vehicle designed to transport 15 or more people including the driver to: (1) Possess only one commercial driver’s license; (2) Possess a valid medical examiner’s certificate if required by his/her State of domicile or location of employment; (3) Be at least 21 years old; (4) Notify his/her employer if his/her driver’s license is suspended, revoked, canceled, or he/she has been disqualified from holding a State/International license; (5) Notify his/her employer if convicted of any traffic violation other than illegal parking; (6) Require a driver and all passengers to use the provided safety belts at all times when the motor vehicle is in motion, on or off the highway; (7) Provide drivers initial and refresher training as necessary for them to operate safely. Also inform them of the potential penalties for failure to operate motor vehicles in a safe and lawful manner (see 49 CFR 383 and 391); (8) Investigate and analyze vehicle accidents related to Departmental operations and take appropriate action to minimize them; (9) Include appropriate safety features in purchase orders and lease agreements for non-General Services Administration vehicles; and (10) Inspect and maintain motor vehicles in a safe, operable condition. Employees on official travel requiring a Government motor vehicle must have a DOI identification card, a valid State driver’s license and a DOI For M1020, Travel Authorization, authorizing the use of a Government motor vehicle. 11.31 -– Care, Safety and Security of Motor Vehicles Any official or employee issued a Government motor vehicle will be responsible for exercising reasonable diligence in the care of the vehicle at all times. Employees who fail to take proper care of a motor vehicle may be denied future access to the vehicle. Operators of all NPS motor vehicles must comply with the maintenance programs designed for use, care, safety, and efficiency (41 CFR 101-39.303). Preventative maintenance is the routine scheduled maintenance of motor vehicles and includes the inspection of motor vehicles, tune-ups, oil changes, filter changes, verification and replenishment of fluids, lubrication, mechanical inspections, alignments, tire wear, and pressure checks. Good preventive maintenance will detect many problems before they become serious; this, in turn, will reduce the amount of unscheduled maintenance and repair, as well

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as the costs and inconvenience associated with vehicle downtime. Operators shall have safety and preventive maintenance inspections performed at regularly scheduled intervals, as required by GSA and/or manufacturer’s schedule, in order to ensure uninterrupted operation of motor vehicles. They are to check and add the vehicle’s gas, oil, battery fluid, and coolant, when needed, and check the air pressure in the tires on a routine basis. Fleet Managers shall maintain a separate vehicle folder for each Government owned, GSA leased and commercially leased vehicle that includes all applicable records and forms, invoices, for all repairs, maintenance logs, and warranty and recall information as appropriate. (1) Vehicle operators are personally responsible for proper operation, care and security of the vehicle, complying with all local, State, and Federal laws and motor vehicle operator regulations, and adherence to all traffic signs and signals including parking restrictions. (2) All motor vehicle occupants must wear safety belts while the vehicle is moving. Occupant injuries in motor vehicles are reduced when the safety belt is worn. (3) Vehicle operators must safeguard the credit card and keys, and remove the credit card from the vehicle when it is unattended, especially when it is left at a commercial facility for service, inspection, or repairs. (4) Vehicle operators must lock unattended vehicles at all times. (5) Vehicle operators are prohibited from using hand-held wireless phones while operating a Government motor vehicle. (6) Vehicle operators must operate the vehicle in a competent and safe manner at all times and adjust driving speeds to local road and weather conditions. (7) Whenever vehicle damage results through misconduct or improper operation by an employee, the employee will be financially responsible. Misconduct includes, but is not limited to, vehicle operation under the influence of alcohol or narcotics and willful abuse or misuse of a vehicle. Improper operation by the driver includes driving the vehicle in a willfully wrong, negligent (including inattention) or careless manner, and failure to adjust driving speed to compensate for road, inclement weather or other conditions including darkness. (8) Smoking and the use of tobacco products is prohibited in NPS owned, GSA or commercially leased vehicles. If NPS employees violate this prohibition, they will be charged for the cost of cleaning the affected vehicle(s) beyond normal detailing procedures to remove tobacco odor or residue or repairing any damage caused as a result of tobacco use. (9) Vehicle operators must immediately report the theft of a vehicle, its contents, and/or lost or stolen credit cards, tags and/or keys to: (a) The supervisor; (b) The local law enforcement agency;

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(c) The FMC when it is a GSA leased vehicle; (d) The Federal Protective Service when it is a DOI/NPS Fleet vehicle, and/or when the theft of a leased or rental vehicle occurs on Federal property; and (e) The contractor when it is a leased or rented vehicle. 11.32 -- Scheduled Maintenance All regions/centers, offices and parks/units must establish a scheduled maintenance program for NPS owned or leased motor vehicles in accordance with 41CFR 102-34, Subpart E. The scheduled maintenance program must meet Federal, State, and local emission standards, manufacturer warranty requirements, ensure the safe and economical operating condition of the motor vehicle throughout its life, and ensure that inspections and servicing occur as recommended by the manufacturer or more often if local operating conditions require. Emission inspections are mandatory for all NPS fleet vehicles in areas having mandated programs, and the inspection fees will be paid by the respective park/office. Parks/offices leasing GSA vehicles should contact the FMC for guidance and assistance regarding motor vehicle inspections. GSA will pay the cost of these inspections for motor vehicles leased from the GSA FMC (41 CFR 102-34.290). 11.33 -- Department of the Interior Self-insurer Card The DOI Self-Insurer Card provides proof of insurance for NPS owned, GSA and commercially leased vehicles. The Self-Insurer Card is not to be used in conjunction with rental cars while on official Government travel or vehicles used while on foreign travel or operated in Canada or Mexico. When a vehicle is transferred or disposed of, the card should be removed from the vehicle and placed in the new or replacement vehicle. The DOI Self-Insurer card will not provide proof of liability coverage for NPS owned, GSA or commercially leased vehicles operated by NPS employees outside of the United States while conducting official Government business. Prior to operating Government vehicles in Canada and Mexico, evidence of liability insurance issued by an insurer is required. To obtain liability insurance, a list of all vehicles that will be operated in Canada or Mexico along with a justification must be provided to the insurance company. The insurance policy will be written to cover the designated vehicles for one year. This information is also available in the Property Management website at: www.nps.gov/propertymanagement DOI self insurer cards may be obtained from the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO. 11.34 -- Reporting Motor Vehicle Accidents This section establishes the procedures to follow in the event of a motor vehicle accident. Officials or employees responsible for the operation of Government-owned, leased or rented

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vehicles shall exercise every precaution to prevent accidents (41 CFR 101-39.400). Because of the possibility of claims or civil suits either against the Government or the employee, the employee involved in an accident while operating a motor vehicle on official business must not admit liability. Employees involved in an accident should stay at the scene of the accident. In some jurisdictions, it is not necessary to summon the police for a minor accident; however, for the employee’s protection, it is recommended. The police will determine if a traffic citation should be issued, and should ensure the exchange of information required for accident reporting between the parties involved. 11.35 –- Accident Reporting Procedures Vehicle certifying officials and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that personnel who operate motor vehicles on official business are supplied with the required accident reporting forms and that these forms are prepared and forwarded promptly. GSA leased vehicles contain an Accident Reporting Kit with the necessary forms for reporting a vehicle accident. Operators of any government motor vehicle involved in an accident shall immediately take the following actions: A. Notify the following persons immediately, either in person, or by telephone, of any accident in which the vehicle may be involved: (1) State, or local law enforcement authorities, as required by law; (2) GSA Accident Management Center (1-800-325-2958) for GSA leased vehicles; (3) Immediate Supervisor; (4) Accountable Property Officer; and (5) The contractor, when operating a commercially leased or rented vehicle. B.

Take the following actions at the scene of the accident:

(1) Obtain the name, address, and telephone number, operator’s permit number, vehicle license number, insurance company name, policy number and claims address from the other driver, as well as any other information necessary to complete the accident reporting forms, Standard Form 91, Operator’s Report of Motor Vehicle Accidents. (2) Obtain the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of any witnesses, and whenever possible have witnesses complete the Standard Form 94, Statement of Witness (41CFR 10139.401). (3) Give his or her name, address, telephone number, permit number, vehicle license number and agency identification to the other driver(s) and the police when requested to do so. (4)

Ask the police officer to collect the required information if personal injury prevents

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collecting it, and contact the supervisor, who will complete and process the forms. (5) Obtain a police investigation report, photographs, doctor’s certification of bodily injuries, and any other pertinent documentation concerning the accident if possible. This information should be processed with all required accident reporting forms not later than 5 working days after the accident. (6) Have the operator’s immediate supervisor complete the forms in the event that the operator is unable. C. Information not provided when the above forms are submitted, should be obtained as soon as possible, and called in or forwarded to the reporting offices listed in D. below. D.

Forward these forms not later than 5 working days after the accident as follows:

Send the original of the Standard Forms 91 and 94 to GSA for GSA leased vehicles and a copy to the regional Safety and Environmental Management Division; for owned or commercially leased/rental vehicles, send the original of these forms to the Safety and Environmental Management Division. Employees injured while operating motor vehicles, and their supervisors, should contact their regional servicing Personnel Division for information and assistance. Central Office employees in the Washington, D. C. metropolitan area will contact the National Capital Region’s Personnel Division. In addition, the Office of Chief Council or the Regional Counsel’s office shall be notified. Every accident must be investigated by the supervisor and when feasible, at least verbally by the NPS Fleet Manager. If an employee receives a legal notice or summons to answer questions regarding an accident, the employee must promptly notify and deliver all legal processes, pleadings, and other papers to the immediate supervisor. Supervisors will in turn contact the Office of General Counsel or the Regional Counsel’s office. Failure to report a motor vehicle accident, and a record showing a high accident frequency or questionable costs could lead to legal and disciplinary action against the employee, and prohibit further motor vehicle use. 11.36 -- U. S. Government Responsibility The Government is the party against which a claim or civil action must be filed by a third party for negligence, wrongful act or omission by a Government employee acting within the scope of his/her employment. Because the Government may be held liable for property damage, personal injury, or death caused by its employees resulting from an accident involving a motor vehicle being used for official business, it is essential that all relevant facts be obtained and recorded accurately, no matter how minor the accident may seem, and regardless of whether the vehicle involved is Government-owned, leased, commercially rented, or privately owned. 11.37 -- Government Rental Car Company Responsibility A collision damage waiver is included in the daily car rental rate for cars rented from companies listed in the Federal Travel Directory. Employees are not responsible for any deductible, loss or damage while operating the vehicle on official business unless it is proven that the accident was caused by the employee’s willful and wanton negligence.

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The Military Traffic Management Command (MTMC) oversees the U.S. Government Car Rental Program for rental cars used by Government employees while on official travel. If an employee is involved in an accident, they should contact the rental car company and complete an accident or incident report at their first opportunity. The employee should ask for a replacement vehicle, if one is needed. The rental car company should also be informed if anyone is hurt and a police report provided, if possible. The employee must also contact the MTMC, Complaint and Claims Department. They can be contacted at (703) 428-3008 or by fax at (703) 428-3391. 11.38 -– Operator Financial Responsibility Under the Federal Tort Claims Act, 28 U.S.C. 2679, damage, personal injury or death resulting from the negligent or wrongful act of a Government employee acting within the scope of his/her employment must be brought against the United States, not the employee. The employee may be financially responsible whenever accidents and/or vehicle damage results through their misconduct or improper operation of a vehicle if the Federal Tort Claim Act does not apply. 11.39 -- Operator's Packet for GSA Leased Vehicles The region/center, office or park/unit operating GSA FMC vehicles should provide each vehicle with an operator’s packet containing information and instructions relative to the: (1) Driver's responsibilities (2) Requirement of use for official purposes only (3) Procuring of routine supplies, services, and maintenance (4) Procuring of emergency supplies, services, and repairs (5) Reporting of accidents (6) Telephone numbers of responsible FMC employees to be contacted in case of accident or emergency (7) U.S. Government Credit Card (8) List of contractors from which vehicle operators may purchase items authorized by the U.S. Government Credit Card (9) List of contractors shown in the Federal Supply Schedule, FSC Group 91, fuels, lubricant, oils, and waxes (10) Names and addresses of each repair facility under GSA term contract (11) Accident reporting kit which contains all of the forms listed in 41 CFR 102-34, Subpart F. Users of GSA leased vehicles must comply with the safety and preventive maintenance

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schedules, instructions and notifications issued by GSA for the vehicle. It is imperative that the maintenance schedules are strictly followed in order to ensure warranty protection. When servicing and inspection work is required, contact the Maintenance Control Center (MCC) for repair authorization and information on vehicle maintenance and service. The MCC is located in most regional offices and is identified on the front cover of the Vehicle Operator’s Manual. Almost all maintenance and repair services are performed by commercial enterprises. If the vehicle malfunctions and requires immediate, emergency service or repair, and operators are unable to contact the MCC or the FMC, he/she should ascertain whether the vehicle and maintenance service is under warranty and take the following actions: (1) Under warranty – go to the nearest authorized dealer. (2) Expired warranty – select one of the following: (a) A service facility under GSA contract (usually provided in the Vehicle Operator’s Packet); (b) Any service station that will honor the assigned credit card, provided that the required repairs or services are covered under authorized use; or (c) The nearest repair shop, garage, or service station. (3) Explain why the facility was selected on the receipt copy of the repair invoice. On the next working day, call the MCC (1-800-622-6344) and advise them of the emergency repairs. (a) If the service repair facility will accept payment by DOI/NPS, have the invoice made out to the MCC listed in the front of the Operator’s Manual. Operators must date and sign the invoice certifying that work on the vehicle was performed, and instruct the vendor to send the invoice to the MCC. (b) If payment must be made in cash, personal check, or credit card, secure an itemized receipt in duplicate. The invoice must be marked “paid” and signed by the vendor’s representative. The receipt must be sent to the FMC. Contact the FMC for reimbursement instructions. 11.40 -– Maintenance and Repair of Commercially Leased or Purchased Vehicles Maintenance and repair requirements for vehicles not acquired through the GSA leasing program should be covered by a repair and maintenance contract. Some vehicles may also have coverage under the manufacturer’s warranty for repair, and/or replacement of defective parts or systems without charge during the effective period of the warranty. Operators must ensure that all repairs and corrections under commercial vehicle warranties are actually performed under the warranty. Vehicle operators and Fleet Managers should consult the vehicle warranties for specific details. Corrections and/or repairs should be made at the manufacturer’s facility or at the facility of a manufacturer’s authorized representative (dealer). Operators and Fleet Managers must follow the contract provisions established for motor vehicles covered by a maintenance or repair contract. The DOI fleet charge card should be used for motor vehicle maintenance and repair, when the motor vehicle service contract is absent.

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11.41 -– Service and Repair of Rental Vehicles Note: The following statements in this sub-section apply only to rental vehicles while in travel status. Service and repairs required by rental vehicles should be provided for by the rental company. Employees should consult the rental car agent prior to signing a rental contract on how to handle repairs and services while operating a rental car. 11.42 -– Vehicle Repair Limitations Except where replacement is administratively determined to be impractical, a motor vehicle is usually replaced instead of being repaired when the cost of repairs is expected to exceed the economic value of the vehicle. 11.43 -– Vehicle Inspections States generally have an emission and/or a mechanical inspection requirement or both. Emission inspections are mandatory for all NPS vehicles in areas having mandated programs, and the inspection fees shall be paid by the park/office that manages the vehicles. Non-NPS fleet vehicles will be inspected in accordance with the inspection laws of the State, Commonwealth, territory or possession. Parks/offices may have to pay charges for these vehicle inspections. Parks/offices may contact the FMC for guidance and assistance regarding motor vehicle inspections. 11.44 -- Transfer and Disposal of Motor Vehicles FMR 102-34 prescribes guidelines for the transfer, storage, and disposal of Government-owned motor vehicles and is applicable to all Government-owned, rented, and leased motor vehicles by the NPS located in any State, Commonwealth, territory or possession of the United States. It is the policy of the NPS that a motor vehicle may be disposed of when it is excess to an organization’s need, or replaced, funds permitting, when it meets or exceeds the minimum Federal Replacement Standards. Arrangements should be made with GSA when a vehicle is excess to the needs of an organization. Each region/center is responsible for developing performance measures for parks to be able to determine when a vehicle is eligible for replacement based on age, reported mileage and/or damage. After meeting the replacement standards listed under 41 CFR 102-34, Subpart D, Government – owned motor vehicles may be disposed of by transferring the motor vehicle title, or manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin, to the new owner. Detailed instructions on the disposal process are in 41 CFR 102-38 and 102-39. Use the following forms to transfer ownership: (1) Standard Form 97, The United States Government Certificate to Obtain Title to a Motor Vehicle, if both of the following apply: (a) The motor vehicle will be re-titled by a State, Commonwealth, territory or possession of the United States or the District of Columbia.

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(b) The purchaser intends to operate the motor vehicle on highways. Do not use the Standard Form 97 if the Government-owned motor vehicle is either not designed or not legal for operation on highways. Instead, use an appropriate bill of sale or award document such as Standard Form 114, Sale of Government Property – Bid and Award. The SF 97 is optional in foreign countries because foreign governments may require the use of other forms. The original SF 97 is printed on secure paper to readily identify any attempt to alter the form. The form is also pre-numbered to prevent duplicates. State motor vehicle agencies may reject certificates showing erasures or strikeovers. The SF 97 is a 4-part set printed on continuous-feed paper and must be distributed as follows: (1) Original SF 97 to the purchaser or donee. (2) One copy to the owning agency. (3) One copy to the contracting officer making the sale or transfer of the motor vehicle. (4) One copy under owning-agency directives. 11.45 -– Parking and Storage Regions/centers, offices and parks that need parking must utilize available Government-owned or leased facilities. NPS motor vehicles will be stored in facilities which provide protection from pilferage or damage. In the best interest of economy, open storage shall be used whenever practicable and feasible. Whenever fleet management system vehicles are stored at other than a storage point designated by the FMC, the storage cost will be the responsibility of that region/center, office or park/unit. Use no cost storage whenever practicable and feasible. Before buying other than temporary parking accommodations in urban centers, determine the availability of Government-owned or -controlled parking space as referenced in 41 CFR 101-39.305. Employees using Government owned or leased/rented vehicles should, when possible, park at a Government facility. When a Government facility is not available or practicable, the following options should be explored in this order: (1)

State parking lots, if practicable (prior approval may be necessary);

(2)

Street parking or other free public parking; or

(3)

Commercial parking facility.

11.46 -- Procurement of Parking Accommodations Regions/centers, offices and parks that need parking accommodations must utilize available Government-owned or leased facilities. Inquiries regarding availability of such Governmentcontrolled space must be made to the GSA Regional Office responsible for the geographic area in which the space is required. GSA will notify the requesting activity, if space is available. The GSA notification shall become part of the file supporting the subsequent procurement by the region/center or park/unit. (41 CFR 102-73.235). 11.47 -- Fleet Charge Cards A Fleet charge card must be used only with the vehicle to which it is assigned. Fleet charge cards are designed to collect motor vehicle data at the time of purchase. Where appropriate, State sales and motor vehicle taxes are deducted from the fuel purchases before your

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park/office is billed. The GSA contractor issued fleet charge card is the only Government-issued charge card that may be used for GSA Fleet motor vehicles. You may only use a Government purchase card if you do not have a fleet charge card or if the use of such a government purchase card is required by mission. 11.48 -– Motor Vehicle Fueling Fuel may be obtained for any motor vehicle owned or leased by the Government by using a Government-issued fleet charge card, Government agency fueling facility or personal funds and obtaining reimbursement. 11.49 -– Motor Vehicle Fuel Usage Motor vehicle operators must use the grade (octane rating) of fuel recommended by the vehicle manufacturer when fueling motor vehicles owned or leased by the Government. Motor vehicle operators must not use premium grade gasoline in any motor vehicle owned or leased by the Government unless the vehicle specifically requires premium grade gasoline. If the vehicle is capable of using alternative fuels (E85, CNG, etc.), such fuel, if available, must be used. Selfservice pumps must be used, unless they are not available. Motor vehicle operators must also use unleaded gasoline in all motor vehicles owned or leased by the Government that are designated to operate on gasoline and are used overseas unless: (1) Such use would be in conflict with country-to-country or multi-national logistics agreements. (2) Such gasoline is not available locally. Substantial savings are achieved through the use of self-service pumps and regular grade gasoline. 11.50 -- Maintenance of Motor Vehicle Records Property Administrators are responsible for developing adequate accounting and reporting procedures to ensure accurate reporting of inventory, cost and operating data needed for the management and control of motor vehicles. Records shall be maintained on each NPS owned vehicle to reflect utilization data (miles or hours operated) on a daily basis. Data covering two or more short trips during a single day may be combined to record total utilization during that particular day. The utilization records of each motor vehicle will be analyzed not less frequently than once each year by appropriate management officials. Necessary action shall be taken promptly to achieve maximum effective utilization at the minimum cost. Utilization records on fleet management system vehicles must be recorded and reported in accordance with instructions issued by GSA regional offices and individual fleet management centers. Operator's Record, Form DI-120 may be used for recording utilization data. This form is available on requisition from the Bureau of Land Management, Printed Materials Distribution

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Section, P.O. Box 25047, Denver, CO 80225-0047. Requests for the form can also be submitted by email to: [email protected] and must include the quantity requested, complete mailing address, phone and fax numbers and the statement “please call for credit card number”. 11.51 -- Motor Vehicle Reporting Data Fleet Managers are responsible for maintaining inventory, cost, and operating data needed for the management and control of motor vehicles and to fulfill the reporting requirements established herein. The Federal Automotive Statistical Tool (F.A.S.T.) System will be utilized to satisfy the data reporting requirements of The Energy Policy Act of 1992, as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-388), the General Services Administration’s (GSA) SF82 “Agency Report of Motor Vehicle Data”, and the Office of Management and Budget’s Circular A-11 “Preparation, Submission and Execution of the Budget”. Motor vehicle data on all NPS owned, GSA and commercially leased vehicles will be entered into the F.A.S.T. system. All parks/offices that have a vehicle fleet must report vehicle data in the F.A.S.T. system regardless of the size of the fleet. The Office of Acquisition and Property Management (PAM) will notify the Bureau Fleet Manager of the date that the F.A.S.T. system will be open to enter motor vehicle data. Guidance for reporting and entering data and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) can be found in the system. The designated park/office Fleet Manager is the person responsible for entering motor vehicle data into the F.A.S.T. system. GSA prepares and issues the "Federal Motor Vehicle Fleet Report" from data submitted in the F.A.S.T. system by Federal agencies on Standard Form 82, Agency Report of Motor Vehicle Data. The data is used to evaluate and analyze operations and management of the Federal motor vehicle fleet. A copy of the report is supplied to Congress, Federal agencies, and to other organizations upon request. 11.52 -- Official Use of Government Passenger Carriers between Residence and Place of Employment This section applies to the use of home-to-work transportation for National Park Service (NPS) employees. Motor vehicles owned or leased by the NPS may be used for home-to-work transportation only if authorized under 31 U.S.C. 1344 or other applicable laws. The regional/center offices shall keep a copy of the written authorization and monitor the use of these vehicles while the authorization is in effect. The Secretary of the Interior is the only official authorized to approve the use of Government motor vehicles between an employee’s residence and place of employment. This applies to all Government motor vehicles in the possession of the United States Government which were: (a) acquired by purchase, transfer, loan, forfeiture or donation; (b) obtained from a FMC; and (c) leased or rented from a commercial source. The Secretary of the Interior shall determine which employees are eligible to use home-to-work transportation. Approval by the Secretary is not required when the home-to-work use of a Government passenger carrier is documented on a DI-Form 1020, Official Travel Authorization Form.

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Property Administrators are responsible for ensuring compliance with this section; ensuring that all officials are fully informed about the policies established in this section; and ensuring that all employees are aware of the limitations on use of Government motor vehicles. 11.53 -- Authorized Uses of Government Motor Vehicles for Home-to-Work Transportation This section applies to the use of home-to-work transportation for NPS employees. The Secretary of Interior is the only official who may authorize the use of government motor vehicles between an employee’s residence and place of employment. Written authorization must be made in advance of using a vehicle for home-to-work transportation. FMR 102-5 authorizes the use of home-to-work transportation under the following circumstances, if approved by the Secretary: (1) Field Work. Official work performed by an employee whose job requires the employee’s presence at various locations that are at a distance from the employee’s place of employment or at a remote location that is accessible only by Government-provided transportation. Such transportation shall be provided only on days when the employee actually performs field work. (a) Examples of employees engaged in field work include, but are not limited to certain law enforcement officers, auditors, investigators, scientists, and quality assurance specialists. Assignment of an employee to a field-work position does not entitle the employee to receive home-to-work transportation. (b) A field-work authorization cannot be used when the employee’s workday begins at the official Government duty station. It cannot be used when the employee normally commutes to a fixed location, however far removed from his or her official duty station. For example, auditors or investigators assigned to a contractor site do not qualify for Government-provided transportation to that site. Although their daily work station is not located in a Government facility, these employees are not performing field-work and are responsible for their own transportation to and from work. (c) Home-to-work transportation is provided only on the days when the employee actually performs field-work. (2) Situations that present a clear and present danger. Those highly unusual circumstances which present a threat to the physical safety of the employee’s person or property under circumstances where the danger is real, not imagined, and immediate or imminent, not merely potential; and use of a Government passenger carrier would provide protection not otherwise available. (3) Compelling operational consideration. Those circumstances where the provision of hometo-work transportation for an employee is essential to conduct official business or would substantially increase efficiency and economy. Home-to-work transportation may be justifiable if other available alternatives would involve substantial additional costs to the Government or expenditures of employee time. These circumstances need not be limited to emergency or life and death situations. (a) This authority is for employees who require occasional Government motor vehicle transportation under the home-to-work authority.

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(b) The circumstances for this authority could be, but are not limited to, trips to attend meetings or training, obtain goods and services, and conduct occasional inspections. (4) Emergencies. Those circumstances that exist whenever there is an immediate, unforeseeable, temporary need to provide home-to-work transportation for those employees who are necessary to the uninterrupted performance of the agency’s mission. (5) Investigative and Law Enforcement Activities. Certain positions and job series require motor vehicles for the safe and efficient performance of protective services, criminal investigations, intelligence, counter-intelligence, law enforcement to include, but not limited to, initial response in conjunction with fire-and-life-rescue services, after-hours standby status or call-out duty, investigative readiness, surveillance cover and emergency backup to a primary 24 hour patrol operation. (6) Contractor Use. Contractors are prohibited from using Government-owned, leased or rented motor vehicles for home-to-work transportation, unless authorized in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 1344 (41 CFR 102-34.230). (7) Official Temporary Duty Travel. Employees using a Government passenger carrier in conjunction with official travel are not subject to 41 CFR 102-5. Official travel is when the employee has a temporary duty (TDY) assignment away from a designated or regular place of employment for which a DOI Form 1020, Official TDY Travel Authorization, has been approved. The requirement to use a Government passenger carrier during a TDY trip must be documented and approved on the DOI Form 1020. The Secretary’s approval is not required for home-towork transportation during official travel. While in TDY status, a Government passenger carrier may also be used to transport an employee between his/her residence and the common carrier terminal or from the terminal to his/her residence. (8) Passenger Riding with Authorized Users. Employees authorized home-to-work transportation may elect to share space in a Government passenger carrier with other persons on a space available basis. However, the passenger carrier cannot travel additional distances as a result, and the passenger must also have home-to-work transportation approval. (9) Miscellaneous Situations. Situations may arise where it is more cost effective for the Government to provide an employee a vehicle for home-to-work transportation rather than have the employee travel a long distance to pick up a vehicle and then drive back toward or beyond his/her residence to perform his/her job. In these situations, consideration should be given to basing the vehicle at a Government facility near the employee’s job site. If such a solution is not feasible, managers shall decide if the use of the vehicle should be approved under the “compelling operational considerations” definition. Home-to-work transportation in these cases may be approved only if alternatives would involve substantial additional cost to the Government or the expenditure of substantial additional employee time. Government motor vehicle transportation must only be used between residence and place of employment on days when official duties are performed and this transportation is absolutely required. An employee assigned to visit other Government activities or subject to call on a 24hour basis is not considered adequate justification for authorizing home-to-work transportation. The use of a Government motor vehicle is not for the personal comfort or convenience of the employee.

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11.54 -- Procedures for Authorizing the Use of a Government Motor Vehicle Between an Employee’s Residence and Place of Employment (1) Requests shall be submitted in writing to the Property Management Officer from the appropriate Property Administrator. Offices shall only request authorization for home-to-work transportation when such transportation will substantially increase the efficiency and economy of the Government. The comfort and convenience of the employee is not to be considered as justification for such authorization. (2) When applicable, the Property Management Officer shall review each request to ensure that it meets the criteria for approval. Requests shall then be referred to the Secretary, through the Director, PAM and the Assistant Secretary - Policy, Management and Budget. (3) All requests shall be transmitted using the text of one of the sample letters provided in this section. The following procedures apply: (a) The Property Administrator shall request authorization for field work positions. These requests can be made for positions rather than individuals. The request must include sufficient information, such as the position title, series, number of positions to be authorized and operational level where the work is to be performed and field location. Field work requests shall be renewed every 2 years. (b) The Property Administrator shall request authorization for investigative/law enforcement type positions. These requests can be made for positions rather than for individuals. The request must include sufficient information, such as the position title, series, number of positions to be authorized, and the operational level where the work is to be performed. No renewal is necessary once approved by the Secretary. (c) Home-to-work transportation for essential employees may be approved in advance through use of contingency determinations. Such determinations shall identify situations which, if and when they occur, will authorize designated employees to be provided with Government transportation to or from work. Such determinations may be based on situations which present a clear and present danger, emergency, or compelling operational considerations. In these cases, determinations should contain sufficient information, such as position title, job series, number of positions to be authorized, and the operation level where the work is to be performed and other information necessary to satisfy an audit. Requests for renewal of contingency authorizations shall contain the same information as the initial request. (4) Authorizations must be canceled in writing when the need no longer exists or the employee's status changes. All cancellations will be provided to the Property Management Officer, WASO who will in turn provide a copy of the cancellation to the Director. Sample letters are as follows:

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Memorandum To:

Office of Property and Space Management, WASO

From:

Regional Director

Subject: Field Work Authorization for Use of Government Passenger Carrier(s) For HomeTo-Work Transportation Pursuant to Federal Management Regulations (FMR) 41 CFR 102-5 It is requested that the officer(s) or employee(s) or position(s) listed and described below be authorized to use Government-owned, -leased, or -controlled passenger carrier(s) (describe type(s) of carrier(s); e.g., motor vehicle(s), airplane, boat) for transportation between his/her/their residence(s) and place(s) of National Park Service (NPS) employment for the purpose of conducting field work for this bureau. (Insert officer(s) or employee(s) name(s), title(s); if position(s) only involved, title(s) and park name and location) This determination and approval is based upon the following circumstances (insert justification) and shall be updated as necessary and recertified every 2 years. The officer(s) or employee(s) listed above, or the position(s) designated or described, perform or involve the performance of field work for the NPS and require multiple stops within locallyaccepted commuting areas, travel outside those areas, or travel to remote locations. These activities or duties come within the definition of “field work” as set forth in the FMR 102-5. Use of Government passenger carriers by the above-listed employee(s) or officer(s), or by those occupying the described position(s) for home-to-work transportation will substantially increase the efficiency and economy of the NPS under the circumstances described, and such use is not for the purpose(s) of the personal comfort or convenience of the employee(s) or officer(s) involved. Such transportation is approved only on days when the employee(s) or officer(s) actually perform(s) field work. Approved:

_________________________ Secretary

_________________________ Date

139

Memorandum To:

Office of Property and Space Management, WASO

From:

Regional Director

Subject:

Authorization for Use of Government Passenger Carrier(s) for Home -to-Work Transportation for Those Employees Essential for the Safe and Efficient Performance of Intelligence, Counterintelligence, Protective Services, or Criminal Law Enforcement Duties Pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 1344

It is requested that the position(s) of the National Park Service (NPS) listed or described below be authorized to use Government-owned, -leased, or -controlled passenger carrier(s) (describe type(s) of carrier(s); e.g., motor vehicle(s), airplane, boat) for transportation between his/her/their residence(s) and place(s) of NPS employment for the purpose of conducting law enforcement activities for this bureau: (Park name and location) (Insert position(s) involved) (job series) (Number of position(s) to be authorized) (Operational level of each position) (Operational level where work is performed) The officer(s) or employee(s) listed above, or the position(s) designated or described, require motor vehicle(s) for the safe and efficient performance of protective services, criminal investigations, intelligence, counter-intelligence, law enforcement; to include, but not limited to, initial response in conjunction with fire-and-life-rescue services, after-hours standby status or call out duty, investigative readiness, surveillance cover and emergency backup to a primary 24 hour patrol operation. Use of Government passenger carrier(s) by the above-listed employee(s) or officer(s), or by those occupying the described position(s), for home-to-work transportation will substantially increase the efficiency and economy of the NPS under the circumstances described, and such use is not for the purpose(s) of the personal comfort or convenience of the employee(s) or officer(s) involved. Approved:

__________________________ Secretary

__________________________ Date

140

Memorandum To:

Office of Property and Space Management, WASO

From:

Regional Director

Subject:

Authorization for Use of Government Passenger Carrier(s) for Home-To-Work Transportation Pursuant to Federal Management Regulations (FMR) 41CFR 102-5 for Circumstances That Constitute a Clear and Present Danger, an Emergency, or Compelling Operational Consideration

It is requested that the position(s) of the National Park Service (NPS) listed or described below be authorized to use Government-owned, -leased, or -controlled passenger carrier(s), (describe type(s) of carrier(s); e.g., motor vehicle(s), airplane, boat) for transportation between his/her/their residence(s) and place(s) of NPS employment: (Insert officer(s) or employee(s) name(s), title(s), job series, park name and location) This determination and approval shall be effective for a period not to exceed 15 consecutive calendar days, commencing on (insert date). The stated time period may be extended and approved by the Secretary, via a subsequent written determination, for an additional 90 calendar day period, if the circumstances underlying this determination and approval continue in existence past the period specified. This determination and approval is based upon the following circumstances: (Describe the “clear and present danger,” emergency, or compelling operational considerations) The above-described circumstances constitute a(n) (choose one or more: (a) “clear and present danger” to the named employee(s) or officer(s) or to Government property; (b) emergency; or (c) compelling operational consideration) within the meaning of FMR 102-5. Use of Government passenger carrier(s) by the above-listed employee(s) or officer(s) for hometo-work transportation will substantially increase the efficiency and economy of the NPS under the circumstances described, and such use is not for the purpose(s) of the personal comfort or convenience of the employee(s) or officer(s) involved.

Approved: _________________________ Secretary

_________________________ Date

141

Memorandum To:

Office of Property and Space Management, WASO

From:

Regional Director

Subject:

Extension Authorization for Continuing Use of Government Passenger Carrier(s) for Home-To-Work Transportation Pursuant to Federal Management Regulations (FMR) 102-5

The officer(s) or employee(s) of the National Park Service (NPS) or position(s) listed below was/were previously authorized, on (insert date of initial determination) to use Governmentowned, -leased, or -controlled passenger carriers (describe type(s) of carrier(s); e.g., motor vehicle(s), airplane, boat) for transportation between his/her/their residence(s) and place(s) of NPS employment. Approval was authorized for the period beginning (insert date when use period began; also add: “and extended for an additional ______ (up to 90) calendar days on (insert date)”, if appropriate). (Insert officer(s) or employee(s) name(s), title(s), job series, park name and location). The initial 15 calendar day (or subsequent 90-day extension) period of authorization to use Government passenger carriers for home-to-work transportation will expire on (insert date when approval is to expire). The circumstances underlying the initial (and subsequent) determination(s) continue(s) in existence. This determination and approval shall be effective for a period not to exceed 90 consecutive calendar days, commencing on (insert date). The stated time period may be extended by the Secretary only, via a subsequent written determination for additional 90 calendar day periods, if the circumstances underlying this determination and approval continue in existence past the period specified. This extension determination and approval is based upon the following circumstances which continue to exist and are (Describe the clear and present danger, emergency, or compelling operational considerations) within the meaning of FMR 102-5. Use of Government passenger carrier(s) by the above-listed employee(s) or officer(s) for hometo-work transportation will substantially increase the efficiency and economy of the NPS under the circumstances described, and such use is not for the purpose(s) of the personal comfort or convenience of the employee(s) or officer(s) involved. Approved: ___________________________________ Secretary

______________________________ Date

142

The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO is responsible for coordinating and disseminating information concerning this program; assisting in completing and processing determination requests; collecting the monthly Home-To-Work Log from employees when usage is made, monitoring usage, and maintaining file copies; and meeting other program requirements. 11.55 -– Home-To-Work Reporting Responsibilities The Office of Financial Management has the responsibility for implementing the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Tax Reform Act of 1984. This Act established employer-provided transportation as a fringe benefit and is considered income for tax purposes. Employees are considered liable for this fringe benefit tax when they use a Government motor vehicle between their residence and official duty station more than 12 trips during the reporting year (November 1 through October 31). Personnel may contact the Office of Financial Management (PFM) regarding the tax rules and regulations governing this IRS tax rule. 11.56 -– Reporting Home-To-Work Vehicle Usage Operators and passengers using Government motor vehicles for home-to-work transportation are required to record each trip on a monthly Home-To-Work Transportation Log. The records must establish that any home-to-work transportation was used for official purposes and at a minimum, include the following: (1)

Name and title of the employee using the carrier

(2)

Signature of the employee and the supervisor

(3)

Passenger carrier identification

(4)

Date(s) of use

(5)

Location(s)

(6)

Duration of home-to-work transportation

(7)

Circumstances requiring the home –to-work transportation

(8)

Approval letter signed by the Secretary

The employee must complete the log, and he/she and the supervisor must sign each page of the log. The supervisor maintains a copy and provides one copy to the Senior Regional/Center Fleet Manager. The Senior Fleet Manager maintains a copy for audit purposes and submits a quarterly report to the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO for submission to the Office of Acquisition and Property Management for updating usage performed under the authorization. Personnel operating non-personal use vehicles (as described by the IRS) may be exempt from the Tax Reform Act of 1984 and are not required to submit a monthly Home-To-Work Transportation Log. Non-personal use vehicles include ambulances, certain trucks and buses,

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clearly marked police and fire vehicles, and unmarked vehicles used by law enforcement officers. Personnel in this category should consult their Solicitor’s or General Counsel Office and the PFM concerning the non-personal use vehicle exclusion. 11.57 -– Home-To-Work Congressional Reports Authorized home-to-work transportation determinations and transportation usage performed by employees for contingency determination (clear and present danger, an emergency, compelling operational consideration) must be reported to Congress. The Office of Property and Space Management, WASO will prepare and submit these reports to the Office of Acquisition and Property Management for submission to Congress. These reports will be prepared and submitted to Congress not later than 60 calendar days after approval. Subsequent determinations can be consolidated into a single report and submitted quarterly. Promptly report exercised contingency determinations to the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO within 10 working days after the last day of usage. Provide the following information: the name and title of the employee; the organizational title; the reason that justified using the contingency determination; and the dates when the usage began and ended or will end. Reports to Congress are not required for field work and law enforcement/intelligence authorizations. 11.58 -- Clearance Requirements The applicable Solicitor’s Office or General Counsel must review all submissions for legal sufficiency prior to submission to the Office of Acquisition and Property Management (PAM). Upon receipt of requests from regions/centers, the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO will obtain the approval from the Solicitor’s Office prior to submission to PAM. Upon receipt, the Office of Acquisition and Property Management will review each request to ensure that it meets the criteria for approval. Requests will then be referred to the Secretary, through the Assistant Secretary – Policy Management and Budget, for approval. 11.59 -– Termination of Approved Authorizations Parks/offices through their region/center must notify the Office of Property and Space Management, WASO when a previously approved determination is canceled, the employee or position no longer requires home-to-work transportation, the determination expires and is not being renewed, or for other similar reasons. The notification shall include the employee name(s), and/or position title(s), determination control number(s) and the approval date(s).

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Personal Property Management Handbook - National Park Service

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE PERSONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK # 44 Release 6 January 2009 PERSONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK # 44 Table of Conten...

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