hlocation of legal description - National Park Service

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Form No. 10-300 (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THH INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY -- NOMINATION FORM SEE INSTRUCTIONS IN HOWTO COMPLETE NATIONAL REGISTER FORMS ____________TYPE ALL ENTRIES -- COMPLETE APPLICABLE SECTIONS______

I NAME HISTORIC

Tredegar Iron Works AND/OR COMMON

Tredegar Iron Works

(LOCATION STREETS NUMBER

500 Tredegar Street

_NOT FOR PUBLICATION CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

CITY, TOWN

Richmond

3

__ VICINITY OF CODE

STATE

COUNTY

51

.————Virginia——————

CODE

Richmond

760

CLASSIFICATION CATEGORY

OWNERSHIP —PUBLIC

X_OCCUPIED

_BUILDING(S)

X_PRIVATE

—UNOCCUPIED

—STRUCTURE

—BOTH

—WORK IN PROGRESS

PUBLIC ACQUISITION

_SITE —OBJECT

PRESENT USE

STATUS

X.DISTRICT

_AGRICULTURE X_COMMERCIAL —EDUCATIONAL

ACCESSIBLE

—ENTERTAINMENT

—MUSEUM —PARK —PRIVATE RESIDENCE —RELIGIOUS

_IN PROCESS

X_YES: RESTRICTED

—GOVERNMENT

—BEING CONSIDERED

_YES: UNRESTRICTED

—INDUSTRIAL

-.TRANSPORTATION

_NO

—MILITARY

—OTHER:

X-SCIENTIFIC

Contact: F. D. Gottwald, Sr. , Chairman of the Board Ethyl Corporation-Richmond Division

OWNER OF PROPERTY NAME

STREETS NUMBER

P. 0. Box 2189. ^HQ South Fourth Street STATE

CITY, TOWN

Richmond

VICINITY OF

Virginia

HLOCATION OF LEGAL DESCRIPTION COURTHOUSE, REGISTRY OF DEEDS, ETC.

CltV

Hall

STREETS NUMBER

Broad Street STATE

CITY, TOWN

Richmond

Virginia

REPRESENTATION IN EXISTING SURVEYS TITLE

Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission; National Register of Historic DATE

1969,

1970

-X.FEDERAL

X_STATE

—COUNTY

—LOCAL

DEPOSITORY FOR

^*——^

SURVEY REcoRDsVirginia Historic Landmarks Commission; National Register of

CITY. TOWN

STATE

Richmond, Washington

Va.. D. C.

Places

DESCRIPTION CONDITION

CHECK ONE

—EXCELLENT

^.DETERIORATED

_GOOD

_RUINS

X_FAIR

__UNEXPOSED

_UNALTERED X_ALTERED

CHECK ONE X_ORIGINAL SITE _MOVED

DATE_______

DESCRIBETHE PRESENT AND ORIGINAL (IF KNOWN) PHYSICAL APPEARANCE

Situated between the north bank of the James River and the south bank of the James River and Kanawha Canal in downtown Richmond, Va., the Tredegar Iron Works District covers approximately 22 acres and contains numerous structures relating to the iron industry and dating from the late 1830 ! s to World War I. At its peak during the Civil War, the Tredegar Iron Works consisted of two rolling mills capable of producing as much as 14,000 long tons of iron yearly; two gun foundries able to cast cannon ranging in size from small mountain howitzers weighing several hundred pounds to 10-ton coastal defense guns; an ammunition foundry; a boring mill; a gun mill; a locomotive factory; a boiler shop; fully equipped machine shops; a brass foundry; a spike factory which housed a pattern and copper shop as well; carpenter and blacksmith shops; a company store; an office building; and housing for slaves employed by the company. The facility was supplied with pig iron and coal by horse-drawn canal boats plying the James River and Kanawha Canal that marks the plant's northern boundary. Today, the sites of the brass foundry, blacksmith shops, and boiler shops are part of Tredegar Street, and the old gun foundry, locomotive shop, and Tredegar rolling mill stand in ruins. Pour historic buildings survive, however. They are the somewhat altered Tredegar Office Building, the restored New Gun Foundry, the Spike Factory, and Company Store all of which are constructed of red brick and have roofs of gray slate. They vary in condition from excellent to deteriorated. Located in one of Richmond's oldest industrial sections, the property currently serves as a storage and laboratory facility for the Ethyl Corporation, which purchased it in 1957 from Joseph R. Anderson's descendants. In recent years, Ethyl has launched an effort to preserve the most important historic structures. The New Gun Foundry has already been restored, and it is anticipated that other buildings will receive similar treatment in the near future. The Tredegar Office Building. Presently, this north-facing, red brick structure consists of an original two-story rectangular main block, measuring 20 by 80 feet, and two irregularly shaped rear additions of relatively recent vintage. The ninebay main block sits on brick foundations and has a full basement. Late in the 19th century, the original hipped gable /> / roof was replaced with the present hipped one covered with ^*,J gray slate. The roof is pierced at its apex by one interior, corbeled chimney, while an inside end chimney projects from the east end. (continued)

[1 SIGNIFICANCE PERIOD

AREAS OF SIGNIFICANCE -- CHECK AND JUSTIFY BELOW

—PREHISTORIC

_ARCHEOLOGY-PREHISTORIC

—COMMUNITY PLANNING

_LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

— 1400-1499

_ARCHEOLOGY-HISTORIC

—CONSERVATION

—LAW

—SCIENCE

— 1500-1599

_AGRICULTURE

—ECONOMICS

—LITERATURE

—SCULPTURE

— 1600-1699

_ARCHITECTURE

—EDUCATION

— 1700-1799

_ART

—ENGINEERING

—MUSIC

—THEATER

X-1 800-1899

—COMMERCE

—EXPLORATION/SETTLEMENT

—PHILOSOPHY

—TRANSPORTATION

— 1900-

—COMMUNICATIONS

XINDUSTRY

—POLITICS/GOVERNMENT

—OTHER (SPECIFY)

X_MILITARY

—RELIGION

—SOCIAL/HUMANITARIAN

—INVENTION

SPECIFIC DATES

1841-65

BJJJJJpER/ARCH ITECT

Reev Davis and others

STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

Although best remembered for its Civil War achievements, the Tredegar Iron Works, due largely to the energetic management of Joseph R. Anderson, ranked as the third largest iron works in the United States in l86l. Since assuming direction of Tredegar in 1841, Anderson had greatly expanded its facilities and markets, giving the Confederacy, says his biographer Charles B. Dew, "a superb heavy industrial complex, capable of turning out large quantities of ordnance, munitions, armor plate, and a host of other desperately needed iron products."! As the war progressed Anderson, faced with a severe shortage of pig iron and coal, gradually purchased his own mines, furnaces, and ore boats with financial aid from the Confederate government, and he created what the distinguished economic historian Fritz Redlich has described as "one of the earliest far-reaching . . . vertical combinations in the American iron industry." 2 During the war, Tredegar, says Dew, "performed monumental service for the Confederate armies, and more than any other single industrial concern, helped the South sustain four years of war."3 "Quite possibly," says Civil War scholar Charles P. Roland, "the tenacity of Confederate authorities in fighting for Richmond was stiffened as much by the need for holding the Tredegar Works as for protecting the seat of government."^ in addition to casting much of the South f s heavy ordnance, Tredegar made the machinery for other Confederate arsenals and industrial (continued) Charles B. Dew, Ironmaker to the Confederacy: Joseph R. Anderson and the Tredegar Iron Works (New Haven, 1966), 2~. 2 Cited in ibid., 289. 3 ^ew 3 Ironmaker to the Confederacy, 290. Charles P. Roland, The Confederacy (Chicago, I960), 67.

IMAJOR BIBLIOGRAPHICAL REFERENCES Dining, Arthur Cecil, and Thomas C. Corchran, The Rise of American Economic Life, 4th ed. (Mew York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1964). ——————— (continued)

GEOGRAPHICAL DATA ACREAGE OF NOMINATED PRQPERTYC JrC a

22________

UTM REFERENCES

ZONE

f LLJU

EASTING

NORTHING

ZONE

JH*«3l*ll.0f

EASTING

Mi

NORTHING

VERBAL BOUNDARY DESCRIPTION

See last page of description.

LIST ALL STATES AND COUNTIES FOR PROPERTIES OVERLAPPING STATE OR COUNTY BOUNDARIES STATE

CODE

COUNTY

CODE

STATE

CODE

COUNTY

CODE

FORM PREPARED BY NAME/TITLE

________Ralph J. Christian, Historian________December ,1976________ ORGANIZATION

DATE

American Association for State and Local History__________________ STREETS NUMBER

TELEPHONE

1400 Eighth Avenue South_______________615-2^2-5583______ CITY OR TOWN

STATE

Nashville .__________________________________Tennessee______. STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICER CERTIFICATION THE EVALUATED SIGNIFICANCE OF THIS PROPERTY WITHIN THE STATE IS: NATIONAL__

STATE___

LOCAL___

As the designated State Historic Preservation Officer for the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (Public Law 89-665), I hereby nominate this property for inclusion in the National Register and certify that it has been evaluated according to the criteria and procedures set forth by the National Park Service. FEDERAL REPRESENTATIVE SIGNATURE TITLE

DATE

' '

'

'"

'"

' :'

DATE

Form No. 10-300a (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY -- NOMINATION FORM

CONTINUATION SHEETTredegar Iron

ITEM NUMBER

7

PAGE one_______

The entrance on the north facade features a one-bay, pedimented porch flanked by two Doric columns and two pilasters. It has metal balustrades and a gabled roof with ornamented pediment. The center-placed doorway has a rectangular, fivepanel, wood door. Most windows are of the rectangular fourover-four sash variety and are set in segmentally arched openings which have brick lintels and stone sills. Inside, the building has undergone extensive alteration over the years. Probably the only original feature is the symetrically molded door and window trim with corner blocks. The full basement has been divided into two large rooms which are used as testing facilities. Currently, the building is used as a laboratory and office facility. The Spike Factory. This three-story, red brick structure with its pedimented gable roof of gray slate is the oldest extant building at Tredegar, probably dating back to the late 1830 f s. Measuring 50 by 110 feet, it sits on stone foundations which originally supported a silk mill constructed on the site late in the l8th century. In the 1863 fire the upper story burned, later being rebuilt in somewhat enlarged form. Window treatments vary. On the east and west sides of the building, first floor windows have rectangular arches; second floor openings have pointed arches; and third floor windows feature segmental arches. Many windows have been bricked-in, but those that remain have metal frames with four vertical rows of five lights each. The north and south facades feature brick pilasters and unadorned roof pediments of corbeled brick. Doorways and window openings have rounded arches and brick radiating voussoirs with keystones that rest on terra cotta imposts. New Gun Foundry. Under construction from 1861 to 1863, this recently restored 1 1/2-story structure with its pilastered walls and reconstructed smokestack has brick foundations. The partially monitored, gabled roof with its brick pediments on the east and west ends is covered with gray slate and adorned on the north and south facades by gabled, wooden dormers with sixteen-over-sixteen sash windows. The purely functional appearance of the structure, which measures 70 by 120 feet, is broken somewhat by brick corbeling along the roofline, roof pediments with round windows on the east and west ends, and (continued) GPO 892 455

Form No. 10-300a (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY -- NOMINATION FORM

CONTINUATION SHEETTre d e gar Iron

ITEM NUMBER

7

PAGE___two

broadly arched windows and doorways. Windows and doors are set in semi-elliptical arches with brick radiating voussoirs with keystones. Most windows are of the twelve-over-twelve sash variety. The corbeled and ironbanded smokestack has a 7-foot-square base projecting- from the north wall and rises almost 75 feet into the air. At present, this building is empty. Efforts to obtain and install a revervatory iron furnace the type in use here during the Civil War. This been carefully restored on the basis of research records and archaeological excavation.

are underway similar to facility has in company

The Company Store. Pacing north from the immediate south bank of the James River and Kanawha Canal, this building is a one-story, rectangular-shaped structure of red brick. It measures 30 by 50 feet, has brick foundations and sits on a full basement. The stepped gable roof is covered with gray slate and is decorated with brick corbeling along the roof line. The north facade features decorative brick corbeling, while the south facade is plain. Most of the rectangular windows and doorways have been boarded up. Currently, the structure stands vacant. Ruins. On the east side of the Spike Factory is the north wall and a portion of the west wall of the old gun foundry, which in later years served as the car wheel foundry. The north wall of the locomotive shop stands on the west side of the Spike Factory. About 75 feet north of the Spike Factory is the site of the rolling mill which is marked by rotting timbers and rusting metal. Other Structures. Within ,the boundary of the designated property are a number of post-Civil War structures that do not contribute to its national significance. Along Tredegar Street near the cobblestone ramp leading to the historic area is a presently vacant shell foundry from the World War I era. It is a one-story structure covered with gray metal. North of this building are the metal-covered locomotive and cooper's sheds dating from the same period. Close to the north end of the Spike Factory is a one-story brick carpenter's shop dating from the 1890 f s. About 60 feet north of the Spike Factory are the remains of a turn-of-the-century water wheel (continued) GPO 892 455

Form No. 10-300a (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY -- NOMINATION FORM

Iron

ITEM NUMBER

7

PAGE

three

and a brick power plant equipped with a Curtiss-type horizonal mechanical drive generator which originally powered the Petersburg, Va. , street car line. About 150 years northwest of the Tredegar Office Building is a frame stable dating from the early 1900 's. In addition to these buildings the landscape is dotted with several storage structures; some are of brick construction and others are wood and metal. Boundary Justification. The boundary of the designated area corresponds closely with boundary of the Tredegar facility at the time of its greatest national significance and includes approximately 22 acres and all extant historic Tredegar structures This entire area is essential to preserving the character of the facility and to protecting it from encroaching commercial development from the east. Boundary Description. As indicated in red on the accompanying maps [(1) U.S.G.S. 7-5' Series, Va. , Richmond Quad., 1964, photorevised 1968 and 1974; (2) R. E. Johnson Sketch Map, TR002, 1970], a line beginning at the intersection of South Seventh Street with Tredegar Street and extending westward approximately 1 3 965 feet along the northern edge of the right-of-way of Tredegar Street as it follows the north banks of the Haxall Canal and the James River to a 5-foot-wide city-owned crosswalk; thence northwestward approximately 278 feet along, the right edge of the crosswalk to a point on the south bank of the James River and Kanawha Canal; thence eastward approximately 1,764 feet along the south bank of the James River and Kanawha Canal to a point marking the northernmost extent of the legal property line; thence southeastward approximately 617 feet to the western edge of the right-of-way of South Seventh Street; thence southwestward approximately 279 feet along the western edge of the right-of-way of South Seventh Street to the point of beginning.

GPO 892 455

Form No. 10-300a (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY - NOMINATION FORM

CONTINUATION SHEETrj re ^ ep;ar

I ron

ITEM NUMBER

8

PAGE

one________________

facilities and rolled the plates for the Merrimac or Virginia, the first American ironclad warship. According to Roland, the works also served as a "laboratory for making new and useful weapons."^ Here, prototypes of the modern submarine, torpedo, and machine gun were developed, and John Mercer Brooke designed his improved rifled cannon. Although Anderson made the Tredegar highly profitable again for a brief period after the war, financial reverses suffered in the Panic of 1873 saddled the company with a heavy debt. Unable to make the transition from iron to steel, it became a facility chiefly of local importance. Located on its original site until 1957, the Tredegar Iron Works, still in the Anderson family, continue in operation today as a small rolling mill in Chesterfield County near Richmond. Situated between the north bank of the James River and the south bank of the James River and Kanawha Canal in downtown Richmond, Va., the Tredegar Iron Works District covers approximately 22 acres and contains structures dating from the late 1830 T s to World War I. Most significant are the somewhataltered Tredegar Office Building, a rectangular-shaped, twostory structure of red brick with a hipped roof of gray slate and rear additions of relatively recent vintage; the restored New Gun Foundry with its pilastered walls, gabled roof, and reconstructed corbeled smokestack; the Spike Factory, a deteriorated three-story, pilastered structure of red brick with a gable roof, which also served as the cooper and pattern shop; and the Store, a one-story structure of red brick with stepped gables and gray slate roof. Nearby are the ruins of the old gun foundry, the locomotive shop, and the tredegar rolling mill, all of which along with the other structures date at least in part from the Civil War era. In addition the property contains a World War I vintage shell foundry, a stable, locomotive and copper shed, a carpenter shop, a power plant, and several storage structures of more recent vintage. At present, the property serves as a research facility and storage area for the Ethyl Corporation. (continued)

5lbld.

GPO 892 455

Form No. 10-300a (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY -- NOMINATION FORM

CONTINUATION SHEET Tredegar Iron

ITEM NUMBER 8

PAGE two_____________

History

The tredegar Iron Works had its origin late in 1836 when Francis B. Deane, Jr., an experienced blast furnace operator, convinced a group of Richmond, Va., businessmen to finance construction of a plant in their city to exploit the growing demand for iron products resulting from the State T s railroad boom. Named Tredegar in honor of its designer and builder Reev Davis, an engineer trained at the famous Tredegar Iron Works in Tredegar, Wales, the Virginia facility was chartered early in 1837 and soon began operations with a forge and rolling mill. Apparently prospering, Tredegar expanded in 1838 by absorbing the nearby Virginia Foundry Company. Soon, however, the company found itself in severe financial straits because of lingering effects of the Panic of 1837 and the ending of the Virginia railroad boom, all of which sharply reduced the demand for iron. The company remained financially troubled until l84l when Joseph R. Anderson, a native Virginian and West Point-trained engineer, was hired as commercial agent. Under his able leadership, the company regained its railroad market, obtained contracts with the Federal Government to supply the Navy with chain, cable, shot, and shell, and became a profit-making concern again. Two years later, Anderson leased the plant from its owners and in 18^48 finally purchased it. Over the years he constantly strove to increase Tredegar T s capacity and to develop it into a complete iron-making facility capable of manufacturing anything from nails to steamships. Although Tredegar constructed at least one steamship and some marine engines and regularly made steam engines and sugar mills for Louisiana planters, its specialties were heavy ordnance and railroad products. Between 18^4^4 and i860, the works cast and delivered 88l cannon of various sizes to the U. S. Government. With the exception of rails, Tredegar produced a complete line of railroad products including locomotives, freight cars, wheels, axles, spikes, and iron bridges, selling them to roads in New England, New York, and Pennsylvania as well as the South. Despite Tredegar T s growth, Anderson increasingly found himself at a competitive disadvantage with northern iron works because of higher raw materials and labor costs in Virginia. Because of the decline of the Virginia iron industry generally, (continued) GPO 892 455

Form No. 10-300a (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY « NOMINATION FORM

CQNTiNUATiONSHEETTredegar Iron

ITEM NUMBER

8

PAGE

three_________

he had to import much of his pig iron and pay higher transportation costs, and to attract skilled workers he had to pay higher wages than his northern competitors. Anderson cut his costs somewhat by using skilled slaves, but generally, throughout the antebellum period, his products had to be sold at higher prices. He made up for this by offering liberal credit and accepting railroad securities as payment. Because of these difficulties, Anderson in the 1850 ! s became a southern nationalist, coming to view secession as a remedy to his and the South's economic problems. During the l860-'6i secession crisis, he actively solicited orders for munitions in the lower South and supplied large quantities of material to South Carolina. In fact, a 10-inch Tredegar mortar fired the first shot at Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861. After Virginia seceded, Anderson offered to sell or lease Tredegar to the Confederate government, but the offer was refused. Prom l86l until the end of the war, the works, says Dew, "performed monumental service for the Confederate armies, and more than any other single industrial concern, helped the South sustain four years of war." 6 In the early months of the war, Tredegar bore the entire burden of heavy cannon production, and by 1865 had cast 1099 field and siege guns for the Confederate forces, as well as large quantities of shot, shell, and cannon balls. In addition to its ordnance activities, the facility made the machinery for other Confederate arsenals and industrial plants like the huge powder works at Augusta, Ga., and rolled the plates for the Merrimac or Virginia, the first American ironclad warship. "Experiments in military and naval armaments" were also conducted at Tredegar, according to the eminent historians, Arthur Cecil Bining and Thomas C. Cochran.' Here, prototypes of the modern submarine, torpedo, and machine gun were developed, and John Mercer Brooke designed his improved rifled cannon. (continued) Dew, Ironmaker to the Confederacy, 290. 7 Arthur Cecil Bining and Thomas C. Cochran, The Rise of American Economic Life, 4th ed. (New York, 1964), 317.

GPO 892 455

Form No. 10-300a (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

FOR-

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY -- NOMINATION FORM

CQNTiNUATiONSHEETTredegar Iron

ITEM NUMBER

8

PAGE four___________

Prom September 1861 to July 1862 Anderson served as brigadier-general in the Confederate"Army before resigning to return to Tredegar where, says biographer Walter S. Grant, "he was more needed than in the field."S Paced with a severe shortage of pig iron and coal as the war progressed, Anderson with financial aid from the Confederate government gradually purchased his own mines, furnaces, and ore boats, creating what the distingished economic historian Redlich has described as "one of the earliest far-reaching vertical combinations in the American iron industry."9 in order to feed and clothe the 2500-man work force, composed of slaves, convicts, paroled Union prisoners, and men detailed from the Confederate Army, Anderson scoured the South trading nails and other iron products for food and using a blockade runner to import cloth. Although successful in taking care of his workers, Anderson through no fault of his own never had enough pig iron to operate Tredegar at more than one-third of its full capacity. Despite the pig iron shortage and a damaging fire in 1863, Anderson kept Tredegar Iron Works operating without interruption until Richmond fell on April 3, 1865. Undoubtedly, this facility, says historian Clement Eaton, was "one of the reasons for the stubborn defense of Richmond."10 At the end of the war, the plant, which had escaped the last days of fighting relatively unscathed, was seized and occupied by Union troops. By the end of 1865 Anderson had regained control of the property and with capital he had acquired from blockade running, cotton speculation, and the sale of his mines and blast furnaces had Tredegar operating again. Prom 1867 to 1873 the company enjoyed a period of unprecedented prosperity supplying the Nation's railroads with everything from spikes to locomotives. Because many of these roads went bankrupt in the Panic of 1873, Tredegar suffered heavy losses, being forced into receivership in l8f6. Although Anderson eventually funded the company's (continued) Walter S. Grant, "Joseph Reid Anderson," Dictionary of American Biography, I (New York, 1927), 269. ^Cited in Dew, Ironmaker to the Confederacy, 289. 10 Clement Eaton, A History of the Old South, 2nd ed. (New York, 1966) , 380. GPO 892 455

Form No. 10-300a (Rev. 10-74)

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY -- NOMINATION FORM

CONTINUATIONSHEET'p re a e g ar I ron

ITEM NUMBER

8

PAGE

five______________

debt and made it profitable again before his death in 1892, Tredegar never completely recovered. Saddled with a heavy debt, it was unable to make the transition from iron to steel and became a facility primarily of local importance, producing some railroad iron, ordnance, and horseshoes. A fire in 1952 caused severe damage to the works, contributing in large part to the 1957 decision to sell the old plant and move to a new location. Today, Tredegar Iron Works, owned by descendants of Joseph R. Anderson, operates a small rolling mill in Chesterfield County near Richmond, while the original grounds and surviving buildings serve as a research and storage facility for the Ethyl Corporation.

Continuation Sheet Tredegar Iron Item Number 9

Page one

Bruce, Kathleen, Virginia Iron Manufacture in the Slave Era (New York: Augustus M. Kelley, Publisher, 1968). Published originally in 1930. Dew, Charles B., Ironmaker to the Confederacy: Joseph R. Anderson and the Tredegar Iron Works (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1966). Eaton, Clement, A History of the Old South, 2nd ed. (New York: The Macmillan Company"] 1966) . , A History of the Southern Confederacy (New York: The Free Press, 1965). Published originally in Grant, Walter s., "Joseph Reid Anderson," Dictionary of American Biography, "Vol: I, Part 1 (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1927), 268-69. Roland, Charles P., The Confederacy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, I960). Thomas, Emory M., The Confederacy as a Revolutionary Experience (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1971).

GPO 892 455

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hlocation of legal description - National Park Service

Form No. 10-300 (Rev. 10-74) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THH INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SERVICE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES INVENTORY -- NOMINA...

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