A Call to Action - National Park Service

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A Call to Action Preparing for a Second Century of Stewardship and Engagement

AUGUST 25, 2011

Organic Act On AUGUST 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act creating the National Park Service, a federal bureau in the Department of the Interior. The Organic Act of the National Park Service states “the Service thus established shall promote and regulate the use of Federal areas known as national parks, monuments and reservations…by such means and measures as conform to the fundamental purpose of the said parks, monuments and reservations, which purpose is to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.”

ON THE COVER

© NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE / KATE BEDIENT

North Cascades Wild is a 12-day outdoor program at North Cascades National Park that offers high school students an opportunity to explore Ross Lake and surrounding wilderness areas. Participants also complete conservation service projects for the National Park Service while learning about leadership, community building, and natural and cultural history.

A Call to Action Preparing for a Second Century of Stewardship and Engagement

A call to all National Park Service employees and partners to commit to actions that advance the Service toward a shared vision for 2016 and our second century.

AUGUST 25, 2011

WE THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES, IN ORDER TO FORM A MORE PERFECT UNION, ESTABLISH JUSTICE, INSURE DOMESTIC TRANQUILITY, PROVIDE FOR THE COMMON DEFENSE, PROMOTE THE GENERAL WELFARE, AND SECURE THE BLESSINGS OF LIBERTY TO OURSELVES AND OUR POSTERITY, DO ORDAIN AND ESTABLISH THIS CONSTITUTION FOR THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

PREAMBLE TO THE CONSTITUTION, 1787

1819 JOHN TRUMBULL / ASSEMBLY ROOM INDEPENDENCE HALL

WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF-EVIDENT, THAT ALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL, THAT THEY ARE ENDOWED BY THEIR CREATOR WITH CERTAIN UNALIENABLE RIGHTS, THAT AMONG THESE ARE LIFE, LIBERTY, AND THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS.

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, 1776

1 0 0 Y E A R S o f S E RV I C E OUR ORIGINS ARE GROUNDED IN A BELIEF The aspirations of the Declaration of Independence and the rights protected for all citizens in the Constitution are based upon our founders’ belief that every individual has the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. These ideas were formed from the lessons of history shaped by struggles with governments in former homelands. The founders and subsequent generations also knew that the grandeur of the American landscape compared equally to the cathedrals and castles of the Old World. So it was inevitable that an institution to preserve both the lessons of history and the best of the land be conceived and established. That institution, the National Park Service, will be 100 years old in 2016.

NPS

F I R S T - C E N T U RY l e g a c y

First NPS badge

In its first century, the National Park Service focused on stewardship and enjoyment of special places, reflecting the core mission articulated in the NPS Organic Act. The result is a National Park System that encompasses America’s exceptional places, including those where civic engagements—often confrontational and sometimes violent—have shaped who we are as a people: Selma to Montgomery, Brown v. Board of Education, Manzanar, the Statue of Liberty, and Flight 93, to name a few. In these national parks we learn not only of people who left their marks on the present, but how individuals can offer the next generation a better future. From the solemn battlefields of Yorktown and Gettysburg to the silent waters that embrace the USS Arizona, national parks also include places where we learn about honor, bravery, patriotism, and sacrifice. In the cathedral forests of Redwood, in the call of the Denali wilderness, and in the quiet of Grand Canyon, we are reminded of the wonder of nature, of the breadth of park resources, and of our stewardship responsibilities. The National Park System inspires conservation and historic preservation at all levels of American society, creating a collective expression of who we are as a people and where our values were forged. The national parks also deliver a message to future generations about the experiences that have made America a symbol of freedom and opportunity for the rest of the world. To visit our national parks is to witness American values on full display in extraordinary places that embody certain “unalienable rights” and inspire our nation to succeed. To actively ensure conservation of national parks, public lands, wilderness, and historic places for the enjoyment of future generations is a priceless gift to our children.

“THE HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF THE NATION SHOULD BE PRESERVED AS A LIVING PART OF OUR COMMUNITY LIFE AND DEVELOPMENT IN ORDER TO GIVE A SENSE OF ORIENTATION TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE.” National Historic Preservation Act, 1966

AZTEC RUINS NATIONAL MONUMENT, 1940

NPS HPC

Tara Morrison

ROCK CREEK PARK

NPS / TONY DEYOUNG

S E C O N D - C E N T U RY v i s i o n America has changed dramatically since the birth of the National Park Service in 1916. The roots of the National Park Service lie in the parks’ majestic, often isolated natural wonders and in places that exemplify our cultural heritage, but their reach now extends to places difficult to imagine 100 years ago—into urban centers, across rural landscapes, deep within oceans, and across night skies.

NPS badge 1970–present

In our second century, the National Park Service must recommit to the exemplary stewardship and public enjoyment of these places. We must promote the contributions that national parks and programs make to create jobs, strengthen local economies, and support ecosystem services. We must use the collective power of the parks, our historic preservation programs, and community assistance programs to expand our contributions to society in the next century. A SECOND-CENTURY NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Connects People to Parks and helps communities protect what is special to them, highlight their history, and retain or rebuild their economic and environmental sustainability. Advances the Education Mission by strengthening the NPS role as an educational force based on core American values, historical and scientific scholarship, and unbiased translation of the complexities of the American experience. Preserves America’s Special Places and is a leader in extending the benefits of conservation across physical, social, political, and international boundaries in partnership with others. Enhances Professional and Organizational Excellence by adapting to the changing needs of visitors, communities, and partners; encouraging organizational innovation; and giving employees the chance to reach their full potential. IN OUR SECOND CENTURY, we will fully represent our nation’s ethnically and culturally diverse communities. To achieve the promise of democracy, we will create and deliver activities, programs, and services that honor, examine, and interpret America’s complex heritage. By investing in the preservation, interpretation, and restoration of the parks and by extending the benefits of conservation to communities, the National Park Service will inspire a “more perfect union,” offering renewed hope to each generation of Americans. 5

Our

S T R AT E G Y

2016 marks the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service—a defining moment that offers an opportunity to reflect on and celebrate our accomplishments as we prepare for a new century of stewardship and engagement. Several reports over the last 10 years have provided a vision for the Service’s second century. A Call to Action draws from three major initiatives—America’s Great Outdoors: A Promise to Future Generations (2011); the National Parks Second Century Commission Report, Advancing the National Park Idea (2009); and The Future of America’s National Parks (the Centennial Report, 2007).

A CALL TO ACTION charts a path toward that secondcentury vision by asking our employees and partners to commit to concrete actions that advance the mission of the Service. These actions are not intended to cover the full breadth and scope of the work the NPS and its partners accomplish. Rather, we must continue the great work happening every day across the Service while transforming the organization to meet the changing needs of our country. We must integrate the work of the 394 national parks with all the National Park Service programs that support community-based conservation and historic preservation. Through the support of the American people, partners, volunteers, and employees, the National Park Service is having a profound effect on the lives of our citizens. A Call to Action seeks to expand those impacts, even in these times of fiscal constraint, by strategically focusing our efforts and aligning our existing resources on powerful actions that advance our mission. It is an exciting time for National Park Service employees and partners as we celebrate 100 years of service in the preservation and enjoyment of the national parks. As we look to our anniversary and beyond, let us renew our commitment to the fundamental stewardship of our nation’s stories and treasured places with energy, creativity, and passion. Note: Throughout this document “parks” connotes not only the 394 units of the National Park System but national heritage areas, affiliated areas, wild and scenic rivers, and national trails as well. The term “national parks” refers only to units of the National Park System. The term “Service” refers not only to the employees but also to the wide range of programs the NPS administers.

Ferron Naranjo

BANDELIER NATIONAL MONUMENT

NPS / SALLY KING

GREAT BASIN NATIONAL PARK © AURORA PHOTOS / BLAKE GORDON

Our Path

Themes Goals

ACTIONS

TO ACTION

The heart of the plan includes four broad themes supported by specific goals and measurable actions. Through these actions, we will work together to set a new direction for the National Park Service in its second century. The Call to Action website at www.nps.gov/calltoaction provides in-depth background information for each action item and a forum for sharing ideas, strategies, and successes on these actions. The implementation strategy emphasizes CHOICE. While some of the actions require the involvement of every park and program, most do not. Program managers and superintendents will select actions that best fit the purpose of their program or park, workforce capacity, and skills, and that generate excitement among employees. Managers must also evaluate and prioritize current functions to decide which may be altered or discontinued in order to implement this plan. FLEXIBILITY and CREATIVITY are encouraged. The plan identifies what to accomplish, but allows employees and partners to determine how to achieve the objectives through innovative strategies and approaches. The actions create opportunities for employees to share successes and learn from each other. The plan will be a living, breathing document on the path toward 2016 that will evolve as we learn together about the effectiveness of these approaches. The work of the National Park Service is too dynamic and extensive to be fully reflected in this set of actions. The day-to-day business of running parks and programs across the Service will continue. A Call to Action should not limit us but instead serve as a catalyst for further creative steps on the path toward the second century of stewardship and engagement.

7

DOI / TAMI HEILEMAN

NPS / JUDY KESLER

Y O S E M I T E N AT I O N A L PA R K

There is nothing more satisfying than helping community groups realize their dreams of having better recreation opportunities in their hometowns. Sharing the NPS expertise locally helps conservation everywhere. Lisa Holzapfel Alaska Region Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program

A SECOND-CENTURY NATIONAL PARK SERVICE will be relevant and valued by citizens as a source of discovery, economic vitality, renewed spirit, and deepened understanding of our individual and national identity. We will harness the collective power of program and park staffs to better serve communities beyond parks in order to strengthen local conservation, cultural heritage preservation, and recreation efforts. We will invite new publics into the parks, from recent immigrants to those serving in our Armed Forces to young people. THEME

P E O P L E T O PA R K S

Connecting

GOALS:

TO CONNECT PEOPLE TO PARKS IN THE NEXT CENTURY, THE NPS must

DEVELOP and nurture life-long connections between the public and parks—especially for young people—through a continuum of engaging recreational, educational, volunteer, and work experiences.

CONNECT urban communities to parks, trails, waterways, and community green spaces that give people access to fun outdoor experiences close to home.

EXPAND the use of parks as places for healthy outdoor recreation that contributes to people’s physical, mental, and social well-being. WELCOME and engage diverse communities through culturally relevant park stories and experiences that are accessible to all.

ACTIONS:

TO ACHIEVE THESE GOALS BY 2016, THE NPS will

Fill in the Blanks

1

Identify a national system of parks and protected sites (rivers, heritage areas, trails, and landmarks) that fully represents our natural resources and the nation’s cultural experience. To achieve this we will work with communities and partners to submit to Congress a comprehensive National Park System plan that delineates the ecological regions, cultural themes, and stories of diverse communities that are not currently protected and interpreted.

Step by Step

2

Create deep connections between a younger generation and parks through a series of diverse park experiences. To accomplish this we will collaborate with education partners and youth organizations to create a pathway to employment with the NPS, with a focus on diversifying the workforce. We will involve at least 10,000 youth each year in a multi-year progression of experiences from education programs to internship/volunteer opportunities to employment.

9

Connecting People to Parks

10

History Lesson

3

Expand the meaning of parks to new audiences and provide an opportunity for communities to learn more about their heritage by conducting history discovery events, using oral histories and other methods, in at least 100 parks.

In My Back Yard

4

Improve urban residents’ knowledge of and access to outdoor and cultural experiences close to home by ensuring that every national park located in an urban area has a well-promoted physical connection to the public transportation system or to a pedestrian/bicycle path.

Parks for People

5

Enhance the connection of densely populated, diverse communities to parks, greenways, trails, and waterways to improve close-to-home recreation and natural resources conservation. We will achieve this through a proactive Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program that mobilizes citizens in support of improved access to outdoor areas in at least 50 of the communities nationwide with the least access to parks.

Take a Hike, Call Me in the Morning

6

Expand the health community’s use of parks as a healing tool and increase citizen recognition of the value of parks to improve health and well-being by establishing 50 formal partnerships with health and medical providers across the country.

Next Generation Stewards

7

Create a new generation of citizen scientists and future stewards of our parks by conducting fun, engaging, and educational biodiversity discovery activities in at least 100 national parks, including at least five urban parks.

Eat Well and Prosper

8

Encourage park visitors to make healthy lifestyle choices and position parks to support local economies by ensuring that all current and future concession contracts require multiple healthy, sustainably produced, and reasonably priced food options at national park food service concessions.

Keep the Dream Alive

9

Foster civic dialogue about the stories of the civil rights movement found within the parks. The NPS will conduct a coordinated series of special events to commemorate significant 50th anniversaries of the civil rights movement (Civil Rights Act passage, “I Have a Dream” speech, etc.).

Arts Afire

10

Showcase the meaning of parks to new audiences through dance, music, visual arts, writing, and social media. To do so we will launch 25 artistled expeditions that involve youth in creating new expressions of the park experience through fresh perspectives and new technology.

Focus the Fund

11

Increase the benefits of NPS community assistance by strategically selecting projects that support urban parks, waterways, and large landscape conservation. To achieve this we will work with stakeholders to create a new competitive state grant program within the Land and Water Conservation Fund State Assistance Program.

Follow the Flow

12

Support communities’ efforts to expand access to water-based recreation and to protect and restore waterways across the country by establishing a national system of water trails.

Stop Talking and Listen

13

Learn about the challenges and opportunities associated with connecting diverse communities to the great outdoors and our collective history. To accomplish this we will conduct in-depth, ongoing conversations with citizens in seven communities, one in each NPS Region, representing broadly varied cultures and locations. We will create and implement work plans at each location, which explore new approaches for building and sustaining mutually beneficial relationships with diverse communities.

Value Added

14

Develop awareness among the American public of the many ways national parks contribute to the economic vitality of our nation. To do so we will complete a study on the economic value of the full range of NPS activities and programs (visitor spending, ecosystem services, community assistance, tax benefits, etc.) and promote the results.

Students from St. Clare’s School on Staten Island collect data during the annual “Day in the Life of the Hudson River” event at Fort Wadsworth in Gateway National Recreation Area. Over 3,000 students at 65 sites

measure the health of the Hudson River Estuary. The unique location of Fort Wadsworth allows students to observe the river as it spills into New York Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. NPS / JASON WICKERSTY

© NORTH CASCADES INSTITUTE / BENJ DRUMOND

NPS / MARTIN CHRISTIANSEN

N O R T H C A S C A D E S N AT I O N A L PA R K

My job consists of helping people increase their knowledge of other cultures through performing arts. National parks not only preserve our nation’s natural and cultural resources, they also inspire us to be better people. Jesus Guzman Chamizal NM

A SECOND-CENTURY NATIONAL PARK SERVICE will actively engage diverse communities and strengthen partnerships to develop innovative communication and education strategies. We will embrace a larger education role, building an understanding of our country’s shared heritage and preparing American citizens for the duties and responsibilities of citizenship.

THEME

Advancing the

GOALS:

NPS EDUCATION MISSION

TO ADVANCE THE NPS EDUCATION MISSION IN THE NEXT CENTURY, THE NPS must

STRENGTHEN the Service as an education institution and parks as places of learning that develop American values, civic engagement, and citizen stewardship.

USE leading-edge technologies and social media to effectively communicate with and capture the interest of the public. COLLABORATE with partners and education institutions to expand NPS education programs and the use of parks as places of learning.

ACTIONS:

TO ACHIEVE THESE GOALS BY 2016, THE NPS will

A Class Act

15

Help students develop a deep understanding of park resources and the relevance of parks in their lives through a series of park education programs. To do so we will adopt a class of 2016 graduates (grade school, middle school, or high school) at every national park and develop a series of fun, educational, and engaging activities culminating in the NPS Centennial in 2016.

Live and Learn

16

Provide multiple ways for children to learn about the national parks and what they reveal about nature, the nation’s history, and issues central to our civic life. We will accomplish this by reaching 25 percent of the nation’s K-12 school population annually through real and virtual field trips, residential programs, teacher training, classroom teaching materials, online resources, and educational partnerships.

Go Digital

17

Reach new audiences and maintain a conversation with all Americans by transforming the NPS digital experience to offer rich, interactive, up-to-date content from every park and program. To accomplish this we will create a user-friendly web platform that supports online and mobile technology including social media. 13 9

Advancing the NPS Education Mission

10 14

Ticket to Ride

18

Expand opportunities for students to directly experience national parks, where natural and historic settings inspire powerful learning. To achieve this we will provide transportation support for 100,000 students each year to visit national parks through collaboration with the National Park Foundation and other park fundraising partners.

Out with the Old

19

Engage national park visitors with interpretive media that offer interactive experiences, convey information based on current scholarship, and are accessible to the broadest range of the public. To that end we will replace 2,500 outdated, inaccurate, and substandard interpretive exhibits, signs, films, and other media with innovative, immersive, fully accessible, and learner-centered experiences.

Scholarly Pursuits

20

Sponsor excellence in science and scholarship, gain knowledge about park resources, and create the next generation of conservation scientists. To do so we will establish, through partner funding, an NPS Science Scholars program enabling 24 Ph.D. students from biological, physical, social, and cultural disciplines to conduct research in national parks each year.

Volunteers from the Boys and Girls Clubs of Yucca Valley and Desert Hot Springs and U.S. Marines from the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center in Twentynine Palms, California, work to restore soils and trailside

environments at Joshua Tree National Park. Participants learn about desert ecology as they help revitalize park natural areas through a partnership sponsored by the National Parks Conservation Association.

© GETTYIMAGES - WIREIMAGE / ANDREW GOODMAN

15

REPRINTED WITH THE PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER TRIBUNE DEMOCRAT / JOHN RUCOSKY

NPS / ERIC ANDERSON

F L I G H T 9 3 N AT I O N A L M E M O R I A L

It is natural and fitting to dedicate myself to work toward continuing to preserve the superlative natural and cultural values of the Pu‘uhonua through my own cultural heritage. Rae (‘Iana) Fujimori Godden Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau NHP

A SECOND-CENTURY NATIONAL PARK SERVICE will manage parks as cornerstones in protecting broader natural and cultural landscapes. Threats unforeseen a century ago have emerged beyond park boundaries and demand solutions that are large in scope and require collaboration with partners. We will be recognized as a world leader in integrated resource stewardship and sustainability of our facilities and operations using the latest technology.

THEME

P re s e r v i n g

GOALS:

AMERICA’S SPECIAL PLACES

TO PRESERVE AMERICA’S SPECIAL PLACES IN THE NEXT CENTURY, THE NPS must

MANAGE the natural and cultural resources of the National Park System to increase resilience in the face of climate change and other stressors. C ULTIVATE excellence in science and scholarship as a foundation for park planning, policy, decision making, and education.

ACHIEVE a standard of excellence in cultural and natural resource stewardship that serves as a model throughout the world.

COLLABORATE with other land managers and partners to create, restore, and maintain landscape-scale connectivity.

ACTIONS:

TO ACHIEVE THESE GOALS BY 2016, THE NPS will

Revisit Leopold

21

Create a new basis for NPS resource management to inform policy, planning, and management decisions and establish the NPS as a leader in addressing the impacts of climate change on protected areas around the world. To accomplish this we will prepare a contemporary version of the 1963 Leopold Report that confronts modern challenges in natural and cultural resource management.

Scaling Up

22

Promote large landscape conservation to support healthy ecosystems and cultural resources. To achieve this goal we will protect continuous corridors in five geographic regions through voluntary partnerships across public and private lands, and by targeting a portion of the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund to make strategic land acquisitions within national parks.

17

Preserving America’s Special Places

10 18

Go Green

23

Reduce the NPS carbon footprint and showcase the value of renewable energy to the public by doubling, over 2009 levels, the amount of renewable energy generated within parks and used by park facilities.

Invest Wisely

24

Focus investments from all maintenance fund sources on high priority national park assets to address critical deferred maintenance and code compliance needs. By doing so we will correct the health and safety, accessibility, environmental, and deferred maintenance deficiencies in at least 25 percent of the facilities that are most important to park visitor experience and resource protection.

What’s Old is New

25

Modernize historic preservation methods and technologies, show how historic structures can be made sustainable, and support efforts to rebuild the economic vitality of rural and urban communities by updating the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Guidelines for the Treatment of Historic Properties in consultation with historic preservation partners.

Back Home on the Range

26

Return the American bison, one of the nation’s iconic species, to our country’s landscape. To achieve this we will restore and sustain three wild bison populations across the central and western United States in collaboration with tribes, private landowners, and other public land management agencies.

Starry, Starry Night

27

Lead the way in protecting natural darkness as a precious resource and create a model for dark sky protection by establishing America’s first Dark Sky Cooperative on the Colorado Plateau in collaboration with other federal agencies, partners, and local communities.

Park Pulse

28

Assess the overall status of park resources and use this information to improve park priority setting and communicate complex park condition information to the public in a clear and simple way. To accomplish this, we will complete 50 “State of the Park” reports that synthesize monitoring information, resource inventories, facilities condition data, and visitor surveys.

Posterity Partners

29

Engage the power of philanthropy to provide legacy support for the NPS both nationwide and at the individual park level. To do so we will develop a $1 billion National Park Service secondcentury endowment campaign working in partnership with the National Park Foundation and national park friends groups.

© BRIAN PETERSON

Minneapolis Public School kids paddle the Mississippi River on the Urban Wilderness Canoe Adventures (UWCA) program. A cooperative effort between Mississippi National River and

Recreation Area and Wilderness Inquiry, the UWCA introduces 10,000 kids a year to the National Park System by paddling voyageur canoes through the heart of the Twin Cities.

19 15

NPS / ROLF DIAMANT

NPS / LINDA FRIAR

M A R S H - B I L L I N G S - R O C K E F E L L E R N AT I O N A L H I S T O R I C A L PA R K

Working for Everglades National Park has provided me an exciting range of new opportunities. I have been lucky to work with supportive leadership that believes in my abilities and continues to nurture my personal and professional growth! Leslie Velarde Everglades NP

A SECOND-CENTURY NATIONAL PARK SERVICE will develop a workforce that can adapt to continuous change, think systemically, evaluate risk, make decisions based on the best science and scholarship, work collaboratively with all communities, and maintain our characteristic esprit de corps in the face of new challenges. We will create an environment where every employee can reach his or her full potential.

THEME

E n h a n c i n g P ro f e s s i o n a l a n d

O R G A N I Z AT I O N A L E X C E L L E N C E GOALS:

TO ENHANCE PROFESSIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE IN THE NEXT CENTURY, THE NPS must

DEVELOP and recruit NPS leaders at all levels with the skills to lead change, work with partners, ensure employee safety, and seek new ways to accomplish goals.

BUILD a more flexible and adaptive organization with a culture that encourages innovation, collaboration, and entrepreneurship.

RECRUIT and retain a workforce that reflects the diversity of the nation, from entry level employees to senior leaders. MODERNIZE and streamline NPS business systems and use leadingedge technology to enhance communication.

ACTIONS:

TO ACHIEVE THESE GOALS BY 2016, THE NPS will

Tools of the Trade

30

Provide employees the tools, training, and development opportunities needed to reach their full career potential. To accomplish this we will launch the NPS career academy with an online career planning tool and course offerings that teach essential competencies in 12 career fields. The academy will contain a leadership track common to all employees and focused on innovation, adapting to change, collaboration, and stewardship.

Destination Innovation

31

Accelerate the spread of ideas, encourage innovation, and inspire peer-to-peer collaboration across the Service. To achieve this we will create a network for innovation and creativity to rapidly share new insights and solve mission-critical problems using online tools such as blogs, discussion forums, and “wikis.”

21

Enhancing Professional and Organizational Excellence

22 10

Play it Safe

32

Empower employees to use critical thinking skills in daily risk management decisions and encourage employees to embrace safety as part of their professional identity. To that end we will ensure that all NPS employees complete Operational Leadership training, implement Operational Leadership principles at parks and offices Servicewide, and create an evaluation system to measure the effectiveness of Operational Leadership.

Home Grown

33

Recruit candidates to provide a source of diverse, motivated, and welltrained employees that reflect local communities by expanding the successful ProRanger and similar recruitment programs to all seven NPS Regions and to additional disciplines beyond visitor and resource protection.

Team Buyin’

34

Create contracting solutions better oriented to customer needs by designing, implementing, and evaluating a streamlined contracting and cooperative agreements process, using a team approach, in at least seven of the major acquisition and buying offices across the country.

Welcome Aboard

35

Create a more inclusive workplace where new employees can quickly navigate our organization to become highly productive. To do so we will implement an orientation and mentoring program for all new NPS employees that will complement the NPS Fundamentals course, use online tools, and provide individual support.

Value Diversity

36

Develop a workforce that values diversity and an inclusive work environment so that we can recruit and retain diverse employees and respond to the needs of the American public. As a first step, we will conduct a Servicewide cultural diversity assessment and complete cultural competencies training for all supervisors.

NPS / CAMERON SUMPTER

Volunteers at Booker T. Washington National Monument portray residents of the Burroughs Plantation receiving the news that they are free with the reading of the Emancipation Proclamation at the annual Juneteenth event, 2011.

23 15

Ta k e t h e

LEAP

Be a part of the vision for a second-century National Park Service. Start by reviewing all the action items with your coworkers and partners. Visit the Call to Action website. There you can view in-depth information for each action item and share strategies and ideas. Then select the actions that offer opportunities for your park or program to make a difference. The next century and a new NPS legacy are about to begin.

How will you answer the call?

www.nps.gov/calltoaction www.inside.nps.gov/calltoaction

Acknowledgments THANKS to the many people who contributed to the preparation of A Call to Action: Chad Beale, Harpers Ferry Center Darren Boch, National Parks of New York Harbor Diane Chalfant, Washington Office Cindy Darr, Harpers Ferry Center Tom Ferranti, Washington Office Maureen Foster, Washington Office Loran Fraser, Washington Office Steve Golden, Washington Office, RTCA Tim Harvey, Washington Office Marta Kelly, Washington Office Victor Knox, Alaska Regional Office Jennifer Lee, Washington Office Meg Leffel, Washington Office Elaine Leslie, Washington Office Diane Liggett, Harpers Ferry Center Joel Lynch, Washington Office Gary Machlis, Washington Office Frank Mares, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Sande McDermott, Intermountain Regional Office George McDonald, Washington Office Stephan Nofield, Washington Office Matt Poyner, Harpers Ferry Center Barbara Rice, Pacific West Region, RTCA Alma Ripps, Washington Office Lee Taylor, Mount Rainier National Park Patty Trap, Midwest Regional Office Alexa Viets, National Capital Region Sue Waldron, Washington Office We also want to thank the following groups who provided timely, extensive, and insightful feedback during the drafting of the plan: Administrative Advisory Committee Communications Council Cultural Resources Advisory Group Deputy Regional Directors Healthy Parks Steering Committee National Education Council National Interpretation and Education Leadership Council National Leadership Council National Park Foundation National Park System Advisory Board National Partnership Council Natural Resources Advisory Group Network for Innovation and Creativity Regional Chief Rangers Servicewide Maintenance Advisory Committee Superintendents Focus Group Tourism Council Wilderness Leadership Council Workplace Enrichment Team

National Park Service Mission The National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The National Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout this country and the world.

National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior

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A Call to Action - National Park Service

A Call to Action Preparing for a Second Century of Stewardship and Engagement AUGUST 25, 2011 Organic Act On AUGUST 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wil...

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